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Bill Gates Says Tablets Aren't Much Help In Education 575

Posted by Soulskill
from the but-it-worked-on-star-trek dept.
An anonymous reader writes "In a detailed interview on the future of education, Bill Gates was surprisingly down on tablets in education — considering that Microsoft just released Surface. He said low-cost PCs are the thing for students, and he dismissed the idea that simply giving gadgets to students will bring change. Quoting: 'Just giving people devices has a really horrible track record. You really have to change the curriculum and the teacher. And it's never going to work on a device where you don't have a keyboard-type input. Students aren't there just to read things. They're actually supposed to be able to write and communicate. And so it's going to be more in the PC realm—it's going to be a low-cost PC that lets them be highly interactive.'"
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Bill Gates Says Tablets Aren't Much Help In Education

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:27PM (#40457515)

    I completely agree with his assessment

    • by jdgeorge (18767) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:37PM (#40457711)

      I completely agree with his assessment

      I'm with you. Although, in 50 years, Bill Gates will be remembered for his work as a philanthropist, not as a software tycoon. And in that light, I feel pretty good about Bill Gates these days.

      • Yeah, I mean, for my distaste of MS, I really find very little Gates says or does that I actually argue with.

        It's really creepy to me: One man starts a cancer foundation, donates to charities, and, at least publicly, seems to be a decent human being, and is generally reviled. Another man is kind of an utter dick, makes abusive business deals, and after years of being a multi-millionaire without contributing anything to society, dies of cancer, and he gets worshiped like some kind of god.
        • by egandalf (1051424) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:51PM (#40458005)
          What? Ballmer isn't dead. (This is a joke, please take it as one.)
        • by sl4shd0rk (755837) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:15PM (#40458343)

          I really find very little Gates says or does that I actually argue with.

          All of you must be a bit new here, or a bit on the whipper-snapper end of the age scale.

          Gates destroyed a lot of companies through anti-competitive business practices which had very real potential to offer choice and alternative in the market. No, most people don't care about that because "look at the Gates Foundation!!". Netscape had a great product before Microsoft ruined that company and The whole SCO, Novell and Microsoft Linux thing a Gates effort to ruin Free software [cnet.com].

          When you watch some really great companies, and products, get decimated by corporate strong-arming over 20+ years you tend to become a bit bitter towards anything Microsoft or Gates. Even the philanthropy. I wouldn't be surprised to find he's making shady money on it.

          • by Locutus (9039)
            He is because his foundation pushes Microsoft software and lets those who sign on the dotted line know they are not supposed to use open source software.

            Too bad his foundation doesn't stick to healthcare and even there they need to stay away from any computerization. He profits from those transactions because he owns stock in Microsoft.

            LoB
        • by poetmatt (793785) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:45PM (#40458813) Journal

          Uh, you might want to look into what charities he donates. A few recently have been good;many in the past have been ethically questionable.

          Donating to provide free microsoft products to africa and microsoft training? I wouldn't act like such a "charitable act" is as much as it was a business decision.

          • I see what you're saying, and I agree to a certain extent, but consider a hypothetical situation similar to this.

            Gill Bates, founder of Bike-rosoft makes a particular type of bicycle that has a thriving market for accessories; it's so thriving, it's practically an industry all to it's self. Bates gets big, and he has to do some kind of aggressive things to keep his hold on the bicycle market. His main competitors are a steel mill that makes bicycle parts you have to assemble yourself, and another company that makes very expensive but very fancy bicycles from a single piece of steel, engineered such that you can't actually replace any of the few parts.

            Now, Gill passes on the torch, and starts to work on other stuff, but he sees that there are some in Africa who could really benefit from bicycles. He also worked in bicycles for years. He stared at his bicycles for years. He believed in his bicycles. Right or wrong, he still believes in his bicycles. They were every bit as much a part of him as anything could be. To a certain extent, they define him.

            My question is which bicycle would you expect Mr. Bates to fly over to Africa? Why?
        • by steelfood (895457)

          They both made abusive business deals to amass the wealth they have. And I believe Jobs did donate heavily to charities, just not publicly.

          he gets worshiped like some kind of god.

          I think that sums up what's wrong in general. But it's not wrong because of the reasons you listed. It's wrong because worshipping an individual is wrong.

          People should be judged by their actions and the consequences of their actions. No one should be considered intrinsically better than any other person. If they are better people, it is because of what they have done, an

      • Riiiight. Same as J.P. Morgan and J.D. Rockefeller are remembered as great philanthropists [wikipedia.org].
    • by ackthpt (218170) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:47PM (#40457939) Homepage Journal

      I completely agree with his assessment

      While I've watched computers go from useless technology, foisted on schools, to useful technology, sought by schools, I can only imagine his brilliant assessment is forged with the same insights that failed to foresee the internet when he was writing The Road Ahead. Bill's strength was always taking what someone else had invented and bundling it into his operating system and driving them out of business -- not because he needed to, but because he felt he needed to.

      Some day kids and teachers will be using these in education, while PCs will be relics of the past. He really needs to shut it.

      • by jedidiah (1196) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:58PM (#40458111) Homepage

        Being a locked down walled garden appliance kind of limits their usefulness. Note how you are trying to segregate them from PCs when that's what they really are.

        Your kind of ignorance is what you get when you don't really educate students about technology. They don't realize how much bullshit you're spewing right now. They don't understand what's going on.

        This is just a PC with different IO devices and some artificial crippling.

        That limits who can contribute in general and who you in particular you can benefit from.

        • by hawguy (1600213) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:27PM (#40458537)

          Being a locked down walled garden appliance kind of limits their usefulness.

          The iPad is only a locked down walled garden to geeks. To a non-technical person, the iPad opens up much more possibility than is walled off. It would be hard for a teacher to find a useful application that's available on "open" Android, but not on "closed" iPad.

        • by willy_me (212994)

          Being a locked down walled garden appliance kind of limits their usefulness.

          No, being locked down does not have to limit their usefulness. It does limit their flexibility, but usefulness is something else entirely. If being locked down simplifies the things they want to do then the usefulness has increased by being locked down. Please remember that usefulness is determined by the user and not everyone is like you.

          Your kind of ignorance is what you get when you don't really educate students about technology. They don't realize how much bullshit you're spewing right now. They don't understand what's going on.

          Who cares about educating students about technology. It is just a tool - much like a calculator. They don't need to understand what's going on - they shouldn't eve

    • Bill also thought the Internet was just a passing fad.

      Tablets will become standard items in classrooms. Just like PCs and whiteboards.

      How they will be integrated is still up for debate. Especially in earlier schooling tablets are still in the gadget phase.

  • Forget the PC (Score:5, Insightful)

    by cpu6502 (1960974) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:31PM (#40457561)

    Pencil. Paper. Calculator. The keyboard gets in the way of doing anything useful, especially if you're trying to do things involving symbols (like math).

    • Pencil. Paper. Calculator. The keyboard gets in the way of doing anything useful, especially if you're trying to do things involving symbols (like math).

      This is why a tablet would be better in most STEM classes than a low cost PC. I tried using my laptop in a CS course for taking notes. But because it wasn't a simple coding class, but more of a mathematical/theoretical course, there was no way I could. Even now, it's hella hard to try typing up papers with any sort of mathematical representations(unless you type everything in LaTeX or try using a GUI equation editor).

      • Re:Forget the PC (Score:5, Informative)

        by edremy (36408) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:16PM (#40458369) Journal

        Pencil. Paper. Calculator. The keyboard gets in the way of doing anything useful, especially if you're trying to do things involving symbols (like math).

        This is why a tablet would be better in most STEM classes than a low cost PC. I tried using my laptop in a CS course for taking notes. But because it wasn't a simple coding class, but more of a mathematical/theoretical course, there was no way I could. Even now, it's hella hard to try typing up papers with any sort of mathematical representations(unless you type everything in LaTeX or try using a GUI equation editor).

        Have you ever actually tried to take mathematical notes on an iPad? I have

        It sucks. Utterly sucks. The touchscreen is nowhere near responsive and accurate enough even with a stylus.

        The best thing I've ever found for mathematical/science notes is a Livescribe pen. Paper, pen, nothing else to learn- except that everything is stored and synced to audio.

        • Re:Forget the PC (Score:4, Insightful)

          by leenks (906881) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:59PM (#40459011)

          Mod parent up. It really sucks to take any technical notes on an iPad. Hell, it sucks for taking notes period - whether thats using an onscreen keyboard, a drawing app and a stylus, or whatever. A laptop is better, but is far from adequate.

          The best lecturers I've had (admittedly this was last century, before tablets were commonplace but still totally impractical for notes) gave the class partial notes for the class. Nobody had to worry about writing the boiler plate stuff - instead they could concentrate on the topic and start to understand it. The lecturer would then ask someone in the lecture what the blanks should be - and we all filled in the important bits (so we got to write it down to help reinforce it, but also got a decent amount of time to THINK rather than writing as fast as we could, missing the important bits, and spending hours trying to catch up. I learnt a LOT in that style of lecture.

          However, I do wish that we had permission to record the audio in lectures, and that tech such as livescribe pen existed back then! (on top of the boilerplate notes)

    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      For more basic stuff there is scope for using a tablet. Keeping children's interest up might be possible with a well crafted app that gives them some personal attention that a teacher with a class of 30 might struggle to. Unlike a textbook the tablet can evaluate how the student is going and give them specific help in areas they are having difficulty in.

      When reading a tablet with dictionary work lookup and notes to help students through the trickier parts of e.g. Shakespeare could work. It would help the st

    • It all depends on the teacher. When I was in junior high school in the early nineties, our Algebra teacher utilized a lab of Mac color classics. We learned algebra and graphing. We even used an early projector hooked up to a graphing calculator. In the early nineties this was cutting edge equipment. Tablets and 'computers' in general are the future. Pencils and paper are just technology, it just so happens that they have been around for 10,000 years and its only now that we are innovating.
    • Re:Forget the PC (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:54PM (#40458053)
      That's what a stylus is for. You know, the input device missing from 99% of "tablets" these days. I had a Tablet PC all the way through college, and I used it for every class. Still have all of my notes, and still reference them in my PhD work, which is easy since they're completely digitized and search able. Can't do that with Pen and paper. Can't do that with iPad either.
      • You know, the input device missing from 99% of "tablets" these days.

        That's because the technology of the screen has changed.
        Stylus use resistive screen. They have a really fine resolution (and fast response), but only track 1 point at a time.
        Modern tablet and smartphone (and trackpads, for that matter) use capacitive screens. They can track several fingers at the same time. But are really imprecise. Still they do all the cool gestures, and can be operated with a hand, so they seem nice during a demo, so that's the current preferred way. (Don't mind that you can't use them t

  • Exactly (Score:5, Insightful)

    by edmicman (830206) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:31PM (#40457565) Homepage Journal

    I've wondered the same thing as I've seen ads that pretty much every major school district in my area are touting iPads for every student next year. I love new shiny tech, but I feel like 'get of my lawn' curmudgeon being skeptical on the benefits of outfitting every kid with a free-to-use tablet. It's especially frustrating when in the same article about the local district offering iPads to everyone (via a technology-specific millage) that same district is still 500k in the hole after cutting $1 million by way of faculty layoffs.

    I haven't looked, but is there research showing that giving every student an iPad improves something?

    • by cpu6502 (1960974)

      If the government hands you a massive check, you're going to spend it. Reminds me of my state's subway to nowhere. They never performed any studies to see if the train would be used..... they just had some spare cash, so the spent it. It's a nice train. Just empty. In the "real world" a company that wasted money frivolously would die out, and so that tempers exuberance. In the monopoly that is government/schools, they have no such fear.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        > In the "real world" a company that wasted money frivolously would die out

        And yet this never seems to happen. Large things just tend to be inefficient by their nature, private or public sector.

    • Re:Exactly (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:45PM (#40457899)

      I work education IT, and every leadership conference in the last few years have centred around iPads and mobile computing. There are always multiple sessions about how they allow for innovative learning, classroom-less experiences, interactive learning, and a bunch of fancy buzzwords.

      Aside from very few cases - autistic kids playing an iPad game show improvement in certain situations is a common example, I haven't seen anything I'd consider an improvement, especially anything that's iPad specific. We've seen many examples of student presentations made with the iPad camera, but they're exactly the same caliber as a regular presentation, or one recorded off any old recording device. They're new and shiny, so people want them. That's generally it.

      Worst case, and in general, kids use the new stuff to fuck around. Give a class iPads and laptops, and I'll show you a class of kids watching youtube. At least with the iPad their not playing flash games all day.

      We recently had one principal ask how we can support a class set of iPads. We asked what he wanted to use them for, and nobody could give us an answer. There were buzzwords - mobile learning, hands-on learning, etc., but nothing concrete on how they would help the children's education.

      Finally I think very few teachers have the skillset required to utilize the new technology in any meaningful way. They don't fit properly with the tried and tested pen and paper methods, and teachers aren't either technologically capable, administratively capable, have the professional development available, or otherwise have the support of their educational system for any meaningful changes. Either they lack the skills, or they lack the support, or iPads just don't fit in an education system.

  • It makes sense. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mosb1000 (710161) <mosb1000@mac.com> on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:33PM (#40457615)

    Bill Gates has been at the forefront of preventing innovation in computing and holding on to old ways of doing things for decades. It stands to reason the he wouldn't be able to understand that computing is possible without a keyboard.

    That said, he is right that the equipment and the curriculum must work together. You can't just buy a fancy new toy and expect it to change much. But in the case of tablets, they could easily replace textbooks and printed materials with more interactive alternatives, and of course there'd be no benefit in having a keyboard if that's what you're trying to accomplish.

    • by rockout (1039072)
      Well said. This is more what I was trying to articulate in my comment above (and I failed miserably, I see). If I could mod you up I would. Most intelligent comment so far on this topic.
    • "It stands to reason the he wouldn't be able to understand that computing is possible without a keyboard."

      Browsing, reading, playing? Yes. Computing? Not so much.

  • by ganjadude (952775) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:34PM (#40457625) Homepage
    you dont have to like gates to see what he is saying is not wrong, at least in the short term. a tablet can only do so much, people are always talking about how it is a complementary device. Now gates says as much, and I will bet a lot on /. will be talking shit about how hes wrong. Tablets are great at replacing 40 pounts of textbooks however, as a tablet (with not easy input) is still slightly better than a textbook (no input), low cost desktops (or laptops) are better for students overall.
  • by JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:34PM (#40457629)

    'Just giving people devices has a really horrible track record. You really have to change the curriculum and the teacher.

    That's right, I've seen this go horribly wrong before.

    And it's never going to work on a device where you don't have a keyboard-type input.

    I'm going to disagree here though. It worked for pencil/paper for decades, no keyboard input there!

  • by sribe (304414) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:36PM (#40457667)

    Oh, really? Last I heard, nobody had actually been able to use one for even 15 seconds. Why, even MS executives on stage were not able to demo one for 15 seconds without it locking up.

    Seriously though dumbass, learn the difference between "pre-announce" and "release".

  • A lot of folks will disagree with what Bill thinks.

    10 WAYS THE IPAD WILL FOREVER CHANGE EDUCATION
    http://www.onlinecolleges.net/2010/06/21/10-ways-the-ipad-will-forever-change-education/ [onlinecolleges.net]

    SD Unified Purchases 26,000 iPads For District Students:
    http://www.10news.com/news/31225263/detail.html [10news.com]
    • Was going to say....we've had REGULAR mobile users groups at the college I work at and TONS of people using them in the office and in the classroom. Our pastors at church started using the iPad for sermon notes and it's been a boon to many kids. Bill's just pissed that his Tablet PC and now the Surface may fail.

    • by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:09PM (#40458261)

      10 WAYS THE IPAD WILL FOREVER CHANGE EDUCATION

      Every single one of those points, except the point that the iPad has limited multitasking capabilities (and that's somehow a good thing in the classroom), applies to laptops.

      SD Unified Purchases 26,000 iPads For District Students:

      At 30 kids a classroom, they could have afforded to give 866 teachers a much needed $17k raise with the money they spent on this technology push that will end up abandoned in 3 years. Better yet they could hire new teachers. Watch as those iPads become outdated and can't run the latest OS with the latest and greatest educational apps in 3 years time. Oh, and that's another $260,000 in a couple years to replace the batteries as they go. How often do you have to replace the batteries on a textbook?

  • it's going to be a low-cost PC that lets them be highly interactive.'

    A low cost personal computer that encourages tinkering? That sounds awfully familiar [raspberrypi.org].

    Shame that the hardware is the easiest part of the solution. Gates is correct there too, curriculum and competent teachers are going to be the biggest obstacle.

  • iBooks ad (Score:4, Interesting)

    by BitZtream (692029) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:37PM (#40457713)

    Preface: I am an apple fanboy ... but ...

    iBook for text books has the best damn demo I've ever seen as to why exactly tablets would make freaking AWESOME textbook replacements.

    http://www.apple.com/education/ [apple.com]

    The current flash on that page displays a demo of someone using a textbook. THAT is HOW text books SHOULD BE DONE. It doesn't have to be iBooks or an iPad, but that general concept is freaking awesome and just goes to show how Billy and the Gates foundation in general aren't about helping the world so much as finding another way to rip it off.

  • "Time to get the hell out of Dodge Monkey boy Balmer, take your stupid me-too ideas with you and stop running my company into the ground.

    Love Bill"

  • by Beardydog (716221) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:37PM (#40457721)
    This doesn't sound down on Surface at all. This reads like a shameless plug FOR Surface.

    Inexpensive, interactive, "more in the PC realm", and with "keyboard type" input? I feel like I recently watched someone not shut up about those features for a solid half hour, BUT WHERE?
  • I would say that a kindle like device would be a good idea simply to replace textbooks etc.

    the idea would be to save money not improve education. The books are expensive and the tablets might work out to be cheaper over all.

    Think about it this way. The students might get a kindle when they enter high school and it would be theirs. They'd keep it year after year. And at the end of everything they could keep it still. I don't know what the depreciation is on kindles but four years in the hands of a high schoo

  • He's right. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by MaWeiTao (908546) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:41PM (#40457821)

    Within very specific environments computers and the like are indeed beneficial. But for education in general all these devices do is distract. Kids want toys, teachers mistakenly believe it will ease the burden of teaching and administrators are easily suckered by anything they think will make them look progressive.

    Even in college, in a course which required computer use I had to be vigilant about my students dicking around on instead of paying attention. The temptation to partake in other activities is far too strong. And the question is if, even when they're used for their intended purpose, do they actually enhance learning over a printed book and a good teacher? Do they actually aid in the retention of knowledge? I think these questions need to be answered first. But I suspect no one wants them answered because it will reveal all this as the gimmick it is.

  • by raikoseagle (855141) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:45PM (#40457897)
    What's interesting here is that Bill agrees with Steve Jobs on the tablet issue. Both Bill and Steve advocating against just dropping technology in to improve education. Steve was more direct, but Bill says the same thing, that it's the Teachers that matter, a good teacher can improve students with less technology far more effectively than a mediocre/poor teacher can with lots of technology.
  • by tp1024 (2409684) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:45PM (#40457905)

    Just having access to books when you need it is reason enough to have tablets or netbooks in schools. Instead of talking about Adam Smith, you can just read his books. Instead of handing out 20-30 thousand page books to all the pupils in the class, all you need is have them download a 1-2MB file. Fully searchable. And that's just one example.

    A single tablet can fit all books you'll ever need in school instantly accessible at any time.

    Even if tablets do absolutely nothing in the way of improving education in any other way, that's reason enough.

  • No he didn't (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:50PM (#40457991)
    Thanks for the inflammatory headline Slashdot. According to TFA, this is what he said:

    Q. Tablet computers are big these days. The Surface tablet was just released by Microsoft last week, and iPads are all over campuses, but it doesn't sound like your approach has been to give devices to students and hope things change that way. What do you think needs to happen for factors like tablets to really make a difference? Or is that not even part of the equation?

    A. Just giving people devices has a really horrible track record. You really have to change the curriculum and the teacher. And it's never going to work on a device where you don't have a keyboard-type input. Students aren't there just to read things. They're actually supposed to be able to write and communicate. And so it's going to be more in the PC realm—it's going to be a low-cost PC that lets them be highly interactive.

    And he's RIGHT. We've seen this time and time again: some school gets some tech grant and goes on a tech spending spree on crap that in the end do nothing to aid in education. When I was in school, we had initiatives like smart boards, which were expensive and broke so much, teachers ended up using them as expensive whiteboards. Then we had laptop carts, where you trucked around this 10 ton cart to classrooms where none of the laptops were charged all the way and they never worked. And when they did work, they added nothing that a trip to the computer lab would have done.

    So just giving students tablets isn't going to work. They'll be fun little novel gadgets, but students need to do real work which includes writing, typing, and other things you cannot do with your fingers. I used a tablet PC throughout college, and it was the best technology investment I made. It was one of those convertible tablets that switched from keyboard mode to laptop mode, and a had a stylus for writing notes. Classmates were constantly begging me for copies of my notes, since I was able to annotate book excerpts and capture chalboard derivations easier than they were able to with traditional PnP. Then the iPad came out and everyone said it was a godsend. I bought one in the hopes of replacing my tablet PC, but I was sorely disappointed at its capabilities. From a student's perspective, it was nothing more than a toy compared to my tablet PC, and I think that's what Bill Gates is getting at.

    The submitter seems to think that Bill's words contradict Microsoft's efforts with the Surface, but the Surface is everything I wanted the iPad to be. It can run serious note taking software like One Note. It can *truly* multi task applications. It has digital pen input. It has a slim attachable keyboard. And when I'm at a desk I can connect it to a monitor and keyboard and use Office, Matlab, etc. as many students need to.

  • by Flipao (903929) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:54PM (#40458051)
    It's early tech, they're going to get thinner, lighter, they're going to accept touch and pen input,... couple that with the development on technologies like E-Ink and Foldable displays and in some 10 years they'll be ubiquitous, not just in education but pretty much everywhere.

    More importantly the work in UX design that companies like Apple, Palm and Google have been doing has allowed users who are not entirely comfortable with the desktop paradign to stop thinking of these devices less as computers and more as standard household items, like TVs or VCRs.
  • by onyxruby (118189) <onyxruby AT comcast DOT net> on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @03:56PM (#40458071)

    Do you want to students to create content or consume content? That's the bottom line, tablets are great for consuming content but suck in a not good way for creating anything more than a brief email. Personally I'd rather have students that can create things than consume things.

  • by walterbyrd (182728) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:01PM (#40458159)

    Just to keep the kids from lugging around books.

  • by stewbacca (1033764) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:01PM (#40458167)

    I am an education professional with a graduate degree in Education Technology. Based on my review of the literature, and my own research, Bill Gates is absolutely correct in saying:

    Just giving people devices has a really horrible track record. You really have to change the curriculum and the teacher.

    This part, however, is 100% opinion, and lacks the data to back his assertion:

    And it's never going to work on a device where you don't have a keyboard-type input.

    He's applying old paradigms from his comfort zone to modern learning. "Never" is a long time, Bill.

  • by DigitalSorceress (156609) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @04:13PM (#40458331)

    The longer he's away from Microsoft, the more I like him.

    Bill Gates is following on in the tradition of the Robber Barons of the Industrial Revolution - win big in the capitalist game, then spend the rest of his life making an actual lasting legacy that does real, actual good for folks outside the boardroom and the stock exchanges.

    Of course, I'm referring to his charitable works, but I see that he's also gaining some perspective that isn't colored by the need to maximize profits.

  • I'm Impressed (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DaMattster (977781) on Tuesday June 26, 2012 @05:16PM (#40459245)
    I'm impressed with Bill Gates' statement with regards to tablets. He is actually correct - a tablet will neither magically make a struggling student excel nor make a poor teacher miraculously stellar. A tablet is simply a tool and when utilized by a teacher skilled in teaching to various learning styles helps augment said teacher. A tablet can help a motivated, organized student succeed at an even higher level. Our educational system needs to do a better job at motivating students and teaching teachers how to teach. Teacher education is critical yet the colleges and universities are churning out poor teachers. Furthermore, funding has been cut to schools and teacher's salaries making the career much less attractive resulting in a downward spiral.

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