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Android Outsells iPhone In Last 6 Months 514

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the more-competing-please dept.
tomhudson writes "Despite all the hype about Apple's latest iPhone, Android has sold more in the last 6 months (27% of all smartphone sales) than Apple (23%). The gains for Android are coming at the expense of RIM (still #1 at 33%, down from 45% a year ago), Windows Mobile (11%, down from 20%) and the iPhone (down from 34% at it's peak 6 months ago). If the current trend continues, Android is expected to be #1 within the year."
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Android Outsells iPhone In Last 6 Months

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  • by SilentSage (656382) * on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:05PM (#33125768)
    Boy Genius [boygeniusreport.com] and Engadget are circulating a report that says that Android has already overtaken Apple and RIM in the US. Android devices collectively represented a 34% share of the US market in the quarter, and with growth of 851% Android became the largest smart phone platform in the country.
    • by unix1 (1667411) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:27PM (#33126218)

      Notes:

      - numbers are for new devices only (not total market share)
      - does not include iPhone 4 - not a lot of people would buy an iPhone 3 in Q2 when new model was expected shortly

      More interesting will be Q2 and Q3 totals combined when Q3 numbers are available. Then put BB6 and WP7 in the mix by year's end and it will get really interesting.

      • by rolfwind (528248)

        Also note, that iPhone infers an actual model differing only in capacity depending on time reference. An iPhone now implies iPhone 4, last year, a 3GS, etc.

        Android is just an OS with lots of different models. It's actually surprising that one device has that much dominance.

      • by bonch (38532) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:59PM (#33126980)

        I'm sure people in the comments will conveniently ignore those facts, especially the one about not including iPhone 4 sales. Many analysts say the iPhone 4 leak hampered 3GS sales because customers were waiting for the new model. Also, it's bizarre to be comparing an OS to one device. It's more accurate to compare Android to iOS, which would then include the iPad.

        iPhone 4 + iPad = more than Android, sorry.

        • by sznupi (719324) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @02:10PM (#33127204) Homepage

          ...but then ignoring non-phone Android devices is fine?

        • by unix1 (1667411) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @02:16PM (#33127334)

          It's more accurate to compare Android to iOS, which would then include the iPad.

          No, it's a valid comparison - the category is smartphone OS market share, which is a perfectly valid and meaningful category.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by RobertM1968 (951074)

          I'm sure people in the comments will conveniently ignore those facts, especially the one about not including iPhone 4 sales. Many analysts say the iPhone 4 leak hampered 3GS sales because customers were waiting for the new model. Also, it's bizarre to be comparing an OS to one device. It's more accurate to compare Android to iOS, which would then include the iPad.

          iPhone 4 + iPad = more than Android, sorry.

          Nor does it include the new batch of Android based phones that just came out (check Verizon for a bunch), so big deal. I suspect if it did, then Android phone lead would increase.

          And since we are discussing smartphones which is prominently mentioned in each article title and the article itself, then it would be ludicrous to include iPads and the iPod Touch (or non-phone Android devices).

    • by Dixie_Flatline (5077) <vincent,jan,goh&gmail,com> on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:36PM (#33126462) Homepage

      IN THE QUARTER. In the quarter. It's the biggest platform IN THE QUARTER.

      Rather than admonishing other people to read your links, please read the story that you're talking about. They haven't caught up to anyone yet, they're just selling faster.

      Ignore the 851% figure because it's meaningless. If I sell 1 phone in my first quarter and TEN phones in my second quarter, that's a growth of 1000% per quarter! All it tells us is that Android didn't have much market penetration before and it's up now.

      In the end, this isn't news. There are MANY manufacturers using Android as a platform and only Apple using iOS as a platform. Apple is tied to the most hated major network in America, and Android isn't. The actual question is 'what took them so dang long?'

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by jdgeorge (18767)

      It's true that the Android platform is becoming dominant. But it is interesting (admirable?) that the iPhones are still by far the most popular smartphone devices.

      Great for Android/Google/HTC/Motorola/Samsung, but certainly nothing to worry about for Apple. People are willing to pay a premium for consistent, well-designed, well-supported stuff, even if the guy who runs the company is a little arrogant. He gets the job done.

      Requisite snarky jab at Apple users: Why does it seem as if even though people prefer

      • by DragonWriter (970822) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @03:09PM (#33128302)

        true that the Android platform is becoming dominant. But it is interesting (admirable?) that the iPhones are still by far the most popular smartphone devices.

        Great for Android/Google/HTC/Motorola/Samsung, but certainly nothing to worry about for Apple.

        And Apple may be the biggest individual seller of desktop computers (it was for a while, ISTR, don't know if that's still true) but the fact that MacOS has far less penetration than Windows means that MacOS is far less attractive for many application developers.

        If the same thing happens with the mobile space, it will make native iOS apps less attractive to developers than other choices. Which has a feedback effect, as the decrease in iPhone-specific apps will reduce the incentive to buy into the platform for the apps.

  • by OrangeTide (124937) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:07PM (#33125808) Homepage Journal

    Turns out Linux doesn't suck and it is good for something mainstream after all. I still haven't seen the real "year of the Linux desktop" but Android has already given us a year of the Linux phone, and we barely even realized it.

    • by Kitkoan (1719118)

      Turns out Linux doesn't suck and it is good for something mainstream after all. I still haven't seen the real "year of the Linux desktop" but Android has already given us a year of the Linux phone, and we barely even realized it.

      I wouldn't say its the "Year of the Linux desktop" since Android is a highly modified version of Linux. Like how no one is waiting to call OSX's rise as the "Year of the Unix/BSD desktop".

    • by Luckyo (1726890) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @02:26PM (#33127538)

      You may consider putting your hopes into MeeGo with this. It's planned to be an OS that will function in both netbooks (and notebooks) and smartphones, and just might smuggle linux onto desktop through the back door.

      Or at least get it decent games and applications finally making it a worthy opponent of windows, rather then one that is constantly playing catch up, and never having any good games supported natively.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by sznupi (719324)

        In quite a bit more. Apart from (obviously ;) ) tablets, there's also a team of few major car manufacturers. [wikipedia.org]

        (and you know, with how FB/Flash/etc. games are taking the world by storm for some time, are in realiy a big part of "PC gaming")

  • ...I wonder which is more popular amongst geek culture. Android is Linux based, so it has a ton of geek cred...but many a geek has allowed Apple's products to take them over (Ars Technica recently had a statistic in which roughly 26% of their visitors use macs)

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by geekoid (135745)

      Every culture has their sellouts.

    • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

      by socz (1057222)
      Well, while osx is part of the bsd family (though the white sheep of the family), I still prefer android simply because I disagree with apple's ethics. Everyone is good and bad, it just depends on what benefits you. I don't like mindlessness and intolerance so I stay away from apple. More specifically, growing up with BSD and it's freedom makes me feel like i'm in jail when dealing with apple products. Don't like their music devices (never have or will own one), phones or computers. Though I originally "lea
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Although your post is pretty much both content free and apropos of nothing, I'm glad you posted it! I was sitting here wondering what your view on Apple products was. Elaborating on why you feel "jailed" using BSD on a Mac or what you meant by "mindlessness and intolerance" or even what about Apple's ethics you disagree with would have really dilluted your thesis, so good call on leaving that part out.

  • by Xemu (50595) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:08PM (#33125828) Homepage

    The numbers for the iPhone are of course going to reflect that the apple crowd has been holding off and waited for the new generation iPhone 4. The numbers for Q3 will be more interesting.

    And then again, who cares, it's just a phone.

    • It's not just a phone. It is determining how portable device will be used by the mainstream. Locked down, or open? The ability to load your own music and ring tones, and app, or only loading what you are allowed ..at a price, of course.

      • It's not just a phone. It is determining how portable device will be used by the mainstream. Locked down, or open?

        To the mainstream, both devices are locked down. Android requires rooting for full openness, the iPhone requires jailbreaking.

        Where you got confused is that the degree of open differs more significantly if you are a developer. But then you should not be confusing what is relevant to the mainstream, vs. the developer.

      • What phone are you talking about? I have loads of music ripped from my own CDs and purchased from Amazon on my iPhone. And I've been using a free utility to make my own ringtones for like two years. [rogueamoeba.com]

        I'm not saying that the iPhone is as open as most Android phones, but overstating your case only makes it seem like you're spreading FUD.

        -Peter

      • by rolfwind (528248)

        It's not just a phone. It is determining how portable device will be used by the mainstream. Locked down, or open?

        The world is not binary, it will be a combination of both.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by RobDude (1123541)

        I don't know what android phones you've got; but the ones I've seen aren't really that much better than an iPhone when it comes to being 'open'.

        If you buy a phone directly, without a carrier, sure, it's "open". But then you are spending several hundred dollars extra. If you buy it through a carrier, it's going to have limits and restrictions imposed by the carrier. Truthfully, even if you buy it yourself, you'll still have restrictions, just fewer of them.

        The source is available for android phones; but t

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Totenglocke (1291680)
          You obviously don't understand what they're talking about when they say "open". They're talking about how you're free to install any app you want - not just the apps a specific group says you're allowed to install. Open as in you can make your own ringtones quickly, easily, and for free. Open as in you're free to use what you want on the phone instead of just what a certain company wants you to use.
    • by Kitkoan (1719118)

      The numbers for the iPhone are of course going to reflect that the apple crowd has been holding off and waited for the new generation iPhone 4. The numbers for Q3 will be more interesting.

      And then again, who cares, it's just a phone.

      The iPhone 4 was released on June 24th, so if the Apple crowd was holding off for it then June/July should have had one hell of a jump making Android outsell iPhone for 5 month's before being re-taken by the iPhone, but that hasn't happened. So its more likely not the case.

      • Who says there wasn't such a jump? The figures in the article are before the iPhone4 release.

        • by Kitkoan (1719118)
          The article is dated for Aug, and it only mentions "the last 6 months" in the article's text which would make me think July was a part of that time frame. Didn't look closely at the graphs that showed they are using a Quarterly time scale.
    • by jittles (1613415)
      I agree that the Q3 numbers will be interesting but Q3 also holds the release of the HTC Evo and The Motorola Droid X, which were both highly sought after Android platforms. So all this Q3 competition should be a sight to see. Now if only I liked popcorn...
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Kitkoan (1719118)

        I agree that the Q3 numbers will be interesting but Q3 also holds the release of the HTC Evo and The Motorola Droid X, which were both highly sought after Android platforms. So all this Q3 competition should be a sight to see. Now if only I liked popcorn...

        Not to mention the return rates of the iPhone 4 due to people not being able to "hold it correctly" might add some fun to the numbers.

  • by dingen (958134) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:09PM (#33125836)
    ...but hasn't the iPhone sales been slow the past 6 months due to anticipation for the new model coming out last month?
  • by BorkBorkBork6000 (769812) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:09PM (#33125840)

    If this trend continues, Android will have 100% of the market in just over 8 years!

    I love linear extrapolation.

    • by dingen (958134)
      In about half a century, Android will dominate a 1000% of the market!
    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      I also love how a single model mobile phone (well maybe four versions or so by now) is compared to a complete ecosystem of maybe dozens of models, and then decried that this single phone can not keep its total sales larger than a pool of a few dozen models. It's apples and oranges. The iPhone versus "all phones running the Android OS" - many with so different functionality and user interface that if you know one runs Android you wouldn't recognise the other as running it as well.

      Is there any single phone m

  • I, for one (Score:2, Funny)

    by c0d3g33k (102699)

    welcome our new Android overlords.

  • by Mongoose Disciple (722373) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:13PM (#33125904)

    Or rather, the exclusivity deal between AT&T and Apple.

    Anecdote: I had lunch over the weekend with a friend who lives in a part of the country that AT&T doesn't cover at all. He and his wife had seen other peoples' iPhones while travelling outside of that area, and all things being equal, would have preferred to buy iPhones, but couldn't. (Yes, they could have bought one someplace else, sucking up a useless contract, jailbreaking, etc., but come on -- that's not a real option for most people.) They ended up getting Android phones instead.

    AT&T's commercials assert that it covers 97% of Americans, but if you live in or spend much time in one of the areas (more than 3% of the map) it doesn't cover, the iPhone loses by default even if Apple's marketing is successful.

  • Yawn... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by illumin8 (148082) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @01:18PM (#33126010) Journal

    Yawn... These are sales from January to June - before the iPhone 4 was released. People were intentionally holding off purchases because they knew iPhone 4 was coming out. Wake me up if they outsell iPhones for the next 6 months.

  • A couple things (Score:2, Interesting)

    First of all these numbers directly contradict the numbers presented a few weeks ago that only 20% of Android users would buy another Android phone. Here it says that 71% of Android users would buy another Android phone. Still lower then Apple's 91%, but that can partly be ascribed to the fact that Apple has built a very strong brand loyalty over the last several years. Secondly, there is a direct negative correlation between the release of the Motorola Droid (which began the release of many droid phones
  • Where is the line between smartphone and non-smartphone? My last two phones have not been considered smartphones, despite being multifunctional, supporting multiple web browsers, having downloadable apps, handling email, camera, GPS, etc. My latest one does all that, is a touchscreen and better at multitasking than the iPhone 4, but isn't considered a smartphone. Why not?

    I'm thinking they draw an arbitrary line that suits their point and only look at the phones above it, despite the many below the line th

  • That's logical (Score:3, Interesting)

    by obarthelemy (160321) on Tuesday August 03, 2010 @02:05PM (#33127094)

    because Apple are limiting themselves too much with the One True Form-Factor. Some people want a keyboard, either palm-style or N900-style, some people want a bigger screen, some want a smaller device (though the iPhone 4 is getting small), and some a more rugged one. No matter how good the iPhone gets, most people I know just won't consider it because of the form factor issue. I for one want a larger screen (my HD2's is 44% bigger by area than the iPhone's, I'm strongly considering a Dell Streak, 99% larger), above all other considerations.

    All the rest (features, locked-ness, looks) can be argued about. Form-factor is a very straightforward issue, and there's a reason why there are so many different ones on the market.

There is no royal road to geometry. -- Euclid

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