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Android Oreo Passes 1 Percent Adoption After 5 Months, Nougat Finally Takes First Place (venturebeat.com) 98

According to Google's Platform Versions page, Android 8.0 Oreo mobile operating system finally has 1.1 percent adoption. Like Android Nougat before it, Android Oreo took five months to pass the 1 percent adoption mark. VentureBeat reports: On the bright side, Nougat this month has passed Marshmallow, meaning the second newest Android version is now the most widely used. The latest version of Android typically takes more than a year to become the most-used release, and so far it doesn't look like Oreo's story will be any different. Google's Platform Versions tool uses data gathered from the Google Play Store app, which requires Android 2.2 and above. This means devices running older versions are not included, nor are devices that don't have Google Play installed (such as many Android phones and tablets in China, Amazon's Fire line, and so on). Also, Android versions that have less than 0.1 percent adoption, such as Android 3.0 Honeycomb and Android 2.2 Froyo, are not listed. The two next-oldest Android versions are thus set to drop off the list sometime this year. The Android adoption order now stands as follows: Nougat in first place, Marshmallow in second place, Lollipop in third, KitKat in fourth, Jelly Bean in fifth, Oreo in sixth, ICS in seventh, and Gingerbread in last. All eyes are now on Oreo to see how slowly it can climb the ranks.
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Android Oreo Passes 1 Percent Adoption After 5 Months, Nougat Finally Takes First Place

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  • Finally! (Score:5, Funny)

    by dstyle5 ( 702493 ) on Monday February 05, 2018 @06:43PM (#56073927)
    I'm one of the one percent! Kneel before me Nougat deplorables!
  • There is nothing new to see here folks.

  • by rsilvergun ( 571051 ) on Monday February 05, 2018 @07:06PM (#56074067)
    that passing 1% is a milestone?
    • by beckett ( 27524 )
      why doesnt google wither optimize their new os to improve backwards compatibility, or increase the hardware requirements to support at least 1 or 2 future major android versions? seems strange they’d go with a blank slate every new update they write, and we’re at their 8th major try alteady.
      • by Shados ( 741919 )

        I found out a while ago that even on Nexus devices (which Google mostly controlled), if there was a change to certain drivers, whatever carrier your sim card was registered to could still block the update by not approving it.

        That's some next level bullshit there. If the phone wasn't that popular (eg: Nexus), then it could take forever to get an update. I love Android, and despise Apple, but they're such a joke in that regard.

    • by AmiMoJo ( 196126 )

      that passing 1% is a milestone?

      No.

      Android "fragmentation" is a non-issue. Even if every Android phone was somehow running the exact same version of the OS, they would still vary greatly in terms of features and performance. Fingerprint sensor or not, SD card or not, phone or non-cellular tablet, quad core or octa core etc.

      By that metric, Apple phones are fragmented as well.

      In addition, older versions of Android DO get updates and security patches via the Play Store. Years ago Google started moving more and more functionality out into lib

      • Also, apps do not immediately drop support for old Android versions like iOS developers do, so running an old version of Android isn't usually noticeable for the end user. They can still download and use the latest apps. Backwards compatibility support & libraries for app developers is generally good in Android, very little effort is needed.

    • The "release date" isn't really comparable to iOS release dates. Google releasing Oreo is just the starting point of the development cycle. The phone manufacturers then get it (in its final form) and adapt it to work with their hardware. Then the carriers get the phones and modify it again to their liking (they shouldn't be able to do this, but that's the way it currently works - Apple managed to negotiate contracts which prevents carriers from messing with the OS). The date when the carriers release th
      • You are technically correct, but Th bet result is that a lot of Android phones/tablets still are waiting for critical patches months after Google said, there is a patch out today, not so with Apple products unless they have been eoled, in which case the users have to decide for themselves, shall I run an unsupported is or get a new device
    • Tell me why I should upgrade again? Android hasn't introduced a killer feature in many years. It's now just re-arranging the deck chairs.

    • Yes, it's a joke. Seriously, I've been an Android guy since late version 2 (or was it early 4, I dunno) the progress in this OS has been atrociously bad.

      They need to find a way, to make the backend important stuff, roll out to more customers.
      There should be an option for ALL phones to use 'stock' Android, somehow (even though the UI is awful in stock)

      They NEED to stop adding features for a solid 18 months and fix performance, it's not good, at all, still.

  • How many android devices are there, versus how many apple devices? Apple, is "one" phone per year or so released, yes they sell millions, but android is on 3,105,592 different phones every year. Granted, Google wanted adoption, made it open, so the manufacturers & carriers were responsible for the updates (if any) and in their business model, it's not worth the time since people just toss their phones away about every 12-24 months, and, other than security patches, for me, android has been pretty stabl
    • by beckett ( 27524 )
      your comment makes android sound great for manufacturers and less than optimal for the end users, even if only taking platform fragmentation into account. its up to the end user to find their own updates in order to save a few bucks up front.
    • so the manufacturers & carriers were responsible for
      the updates (if any) and in their business model, it's not worth the time since people
      just toss their phones away about every 12-24 months,

      It's more precisely the business model that they *wish* to have.

      Reality is a bit different. Some old phone remain for use much more longer, usually changing hand several time (second hand market) and eventually ending up in third-world countries.

      To everybody can actually afford to re-buy a brand new shining phone every other year. And not a lot of manufacturer can cater to poorer markets with modestly speced phone at bargain bin prices.

      But meanwhile, the money that the manufacturer could have made has alrea

  • According to Google's Platform Versions page, Android 8.0 Oreo mobile operating system finally has 1.1 percent adoption. Like Android Nougat before it, Android Oreo took five months to pass the 1 percent adoption mark. [venturebeat.com]

    Linked as it appears in TFS.

    • According to Google's Platform Versions page, Android 8.0 Oreo mobile operating system finally has 1.1 percent adoption. Like Android Nougat before it, Android Oreo took five months to pass the 1 percent adoption mark. [venturebeat.com]

      Linked as it appears in TFS.

      As opposed to iOS, where iOS 11 adoption is ALREADY at 65 percent:

      https://9to5mac.com/2018/01/19... [9to5mac.com]

      And no, Apple does NOT FORCE UPGRADES. My iPhone 6 Plus is still running 10.3.3. Apple doesn't even nag me anymore about it.

      • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

        Dude, why are you replying to me to argue about iOS adoption? I'm pointing out the link in the summary is to the wrong story and has nothing to do with the topic.

        To use one man's words, regarding my post: You're reading it wrong.

    • Yup, indeed, wrong link (about Telegram being pulled out of the appstore due to Child pornography).

      Speaking of which :

      - How did Apple check the existence of Child pornography ? Wasn't Telegram supposed to be exclusively using end-to-end encryption ? Or did they ask investigating police officers to start chat with CP-distributors ?... (read the Wikipedia article...) Ah okay. end-to-end encryption isn't default and users need to initiate "secret chat" to enable it.

      - Telegram is only a communication s

  • by dicobalt ( 1536225 ) on Monday February 05, 2018 @09:47PM (#56074559)
    With trillions of unpatched holes. Maybe one day they will invent Windows Update.
    • With trillions of unpatched holes. Maybe one day they will invent Windows Update.

      I bought a gift a year ago and it was even worse with tablets on physical stores or Amazon. The asymptotic Android 4.4 version apparently just dropped off the map, but it dragged results down for years. Most worrysome is that its old Dalvik runtime is dog slow at best, and infuriating under load. 5 makes things better, but I wouldn't bet on finding it for cheap.

      A few hours ago tonight I coincidentally ran into https://www.cnet.com/topics/ta... [cnet.com]
      where Samsung tablet's video says "best one it's ever made". It's

      • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

        The asymptotic Android 4.4 version apparently just dropped off the map, but it dragged results down for years.

        That's because Google has officially stopped supporting Android 4.4. The last monthly security update that supported Android 4.4 was September 2017.

        October 2017 deprecated Android 5.0 security updates. Android 5.1 remains supported for now.

        Android 4.4 and 5.0 security updates can be backported, but that's it. Google does not support those versions of Android anymore.

        So yes, those old Androids are

    • They have (for tablets, at least). It's called ChromeOS and it does have timely updates.

      Unfortunatelly, ChromeOS would be awful on smartphones so all Google did is create a new partitioning scheme for Oreo devices that has a separated partition for hardware drivers (Project Treble), making Oreo+ updates easier on the manufacturers. Of course, they will probably still prefer selling new devices to updating existing ones, so I'm not really hopeful about that.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Pathetic effort from Google and their software developers. Stop pointing fingers at manufacturers, and solve the upgrade mess.

    • Stop pointing fingers at manufacturers, and solve the upgrade mess.

      How? With Android being open, both manufacturers and carriers are free to do as they please. Remember, Google is an advertising company. Unlike Apple, their goal with Android was mass adoption to get pervasive (inexpensive) smart phones in as many hands as possible to drive as many Google searches as possible to serve ads to as many eyeballs as possible . Through that lens, they've been very successful.

      Neither the fragmentation nor the

      • With Android being open, both manufacturers and carriers are free to do as they please.

        No they aren't, not in reality.

        Android phones without Play Services aren't very useful and to get Play Services you have to abide by Google's rules. They should have made regular updates (pushed directly by Google) a requirement to get Play Services on your phone.

        Also, don't Android apps run in a VM, and wasn't one of the biggest advantages of using a VM that apps can be OS and platform agnostic ? So why doesn't Google just update the VM/runtime to the latest API version regardless of the underlying OS vers

        • Android phones without Play Services aren't very useful and to get Play Services you have to abide by Google's rules.

          To nerds, stuff like that matters. Joe Sixpack likely has no idea what Play Services is or why he would want it. Joe just cares about calls, texting, maybe e-mail, web browsing, and streaming TV or sports. And the typical phone store drone just wants to make a sale. There are far more many eyeballs to serve ads to like those of Joe than there are of nerds who are savvy enough to install ad-b

    • by Anonymous Coward

      In a way, they already have with Project Treble. Thing is, both of those initiatives run counter to the desires of OEMs (hold back updates to force users to upgrade, baking their own crapware into the system image), so now loads of OEMs are purposely only selling devices with Nougat and an "upgrade" to Oreo specifically to avoid having to implement Treble.

  • nougat on my tablet can only charge once per boot. apparently when the mtp daemon crashes that stops charging and i have to reboot. every time i unplug it XD
  • The âtook five months..." link actually links to https://venturebeat.com/2018/0... [venturebeat.com]

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