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More Than Half of Emails Worldwide Are Now Opened in a Mobile Environment (emarketer.com) 47

A reader shares a research report: The world of email marketing has changed pretty significantly over the past five years. Where desktop clients like Outlook were once a more important delivery medium, readers of email are now in the thrall of mobile clients and webmail services like Gmail. In fact, new research from Return Path found that more than half of emails worldwide (55%) are opened in a mobile environment in 2017, significantly more than either webmail (28%) or desktop (16%). Mobile has emerged as the dominant email environment since Return Path last conducted its survey in 2012, when only 29% of emails were opened on a mobile device, and webmail clients were the most popular method of accessing such electronic missives. Return Path also found that Apple's iOS was dominant among mobile email users worldwide, with 79% of mobile emails opened on either an iPhone or iPad this year. While only 20% of emails were opened on a device running Android, that was actually an increase of 6 percentage points from 2012's figure.
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More Than Half of Emails Worldwide Are Now Opened in a Mobile Environment

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  • Only the old fogies relentlessly protecting their lawn from encroachment by the young ruffians, whippersnappers and assorted hoodlums still read email.

    Its all sms, tweet, fb msg, snachat man....

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Only the old fogies relentlessly protecting their lawn from encroachment by the young ruffians, whippersnappers and assorted hoodlums still read email.

      Its all sms, tweet, fb msg, snachat man....

      Guess that explains why no one responds to my telegrams.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      What's tweets, grandpa?

    • If IOS has less than 20% of the market share but is opening 79% of the email on mobile it shows a difference in the type of users as well on each mobile platform. You mention plenty of apps that aren't traditional email but are extremely popular means of communication. Overall email appears to be loosing in the android market.

      • My first guess is that users of low-end Android phones are less likely to regularly use email in the first place.

        An iPhone is more expensive than an entry-level Android phone. A cellular subscription that provides more than 10 GB per month of data* is more expensive than one that provides only 1 or 2 GB per month or only voice and SMS. Thus we can assume that ability to afford an iPhone and ability to afford a large data plan are correlated.

        In addition, many people want a mobile phone more capable than a fl

        • Actually I was thinking about my sons and their friends who have more mid priced android phones with unlimited data and use FB for most of their communications. I think the only person they ever text or call is me even their mother talks to them on FB.

          • by sd4f ( 1891894 )
            I've noticed the same thing, increasingly the phone communication is becoming redundant.
    • by fisted ( 2295862 ) on Wednesday October 25, 2017 @12:13PM (#55430737)

      I know you're joking, but still:

      sms

      Not free, not reliably (yes it usually works, that doesn't change that it's not reliable)

      tweet

      Centralized, goes away when whoever owns twitter loses interest or goes out of business. Ads likely. Data mining likely.

      fb msg

      Centralized, goes away when whoever owns facebook loses interest or goes out of business. Ads guaranteed. Data mining guaranteed.

      snachat

      Centralized, goes away when whoever owns snapchat loses interest or goes out of business. Ads likely. Data mining likely.

      Email is one of the very few services that is decentral and can absolutely not go away at the whim of one (or even many) corporations (it doesn't matter that users try to re-centralize it by essentially using just one mail service provider, if gmail goes down, Email doesn't give a shit).

      Email is also reliable in a technical sense. The mail either gets delivered, or you get a bounce mail. Anything else is broken and misconfigured and gets you hate mail at postmaster@ very quickly. The pertinent specifications are very strict about this.
      When people tell you your Email "probably got lost", you can be pretty sure they're lying in your face (or are too dumb to check their spam folder). Absolutely and every time ask your sysadmin about what's with the email.
      In 99% of the cases the answer will be either "Yes, we accepted and delivered the mail", or "No, we haven't even seen a submission attempt".
      Bonus: If an Email, according to your sysadmin, *did* get lost for whatever reason, you can yell at them for violating RFC2821 (or whatever's hip now) and they will likely understand your madness and apologize and fix the situation and be ashamed for a week If they don't, then you know for a fact they're incompetent.

      Well, what was I gonna say? Right. Email works. Email is good. No, I'm not grandpa. In fact I'm one of the much-hated-here millenials who apparently use, but don't understand technology.

      Anyway, Email is fine, mkay? There's the spam problem, but I consider that an acceptable cost for a decentral system.

      • by tepples ( 727027 )

        sms

        Not free

        Nor is a data plan, which email requires. You need either cellular data through a cellular carrier or home data through a home ISP. Some cellular plans in the United States have unmetered talk and text but metered or no data.

        When people tell you your Email "probably got lost", you can be pretty sure they're lying in your face (or are too dumb to check their spam folder).

        Unless a filter on the recipient's server has blackholed the message on "almost certainly spam, phish, or malware" grounds rather than bouncing it or routing it to the recipient's spam folder. Or unless it has sat in queues or greylists on various intermediate MTAs for a total of severa

        • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

          Or unless it has sat in queues or greylists on various intermediate MTAs for a total of several minutes.

          Or hours, even. I've seen it happen - even on time-senstiive emails (someone sent me a meeting request. I never got it until hours later which left me completely confused. Turned out some MTA held onto it for 3-4 hours because of ???)

          It can also take time from a backup MX to actually deliver the email to the recipient as well - especially if the backup MX is set to only hold mail and forward it onto the m

        • by fisted ( 2295862 )

          sms

          Not free

          Nor is a data plan, which email requires. You need either cellular data through a cellular carrier or home data through a home ISP. Some cellular plans in the United States have unmetered talk and text but metered or no data.

          You need either an ISP or a mobile data plan to access the internet, and it's not free, sure. Then, email is free and sms costs extra money (you don't get "free text", you pay for it monthly)

          Unless a filter on the recipient's server has blackholed the message on "almost certainly spam, phish, or malware" grounds rather than bouncing it or routing it to the recipient's spam folder.

          I specifically addressed broken and misconfigured systems. And "blackholing" doesn't mean there's no trace in the log files.

          Or unless it has sat in queues or greylists on various intermediate MTAs for a total of several minutes.

          Okay fair point, you can't rely on the mail to arrive immediately. But you probably wouldn't start annoying the recipient by asking them whether they received your email yet, within the first cou

          • by tepples ( 727027 )

            You need either an ISP or a mobile data plan to access the internet, and it's not free, sure. Then, email is free

            Email over cellular isn't free if it causes the data subscriber to hit his plan's cap. Overages tend to cost $10/mo or more.

            and sms costs extra money (you don't get "free text", you pay for it monthly)

            I thought one already had to pay for SMS in order to get 2-factor authentication on popular websites. Google and Twitter, for example, won't let a user use TOTP as a second factor unless the user first sets up SMS. And nowadays, the next step up from pay-per-minute cellular tends to be a plan with more minutes and texts than the average subscriber knows what to do with.

            And "blackholing" doesn't mean there's no trace in the log files.

            But good luck co

            • by fisted ( 2295862 )

              Email over cellular isn't free if it causes the data subscriber to hit his plan's cap. Overages tend to cost $10/mo or more.

              Your Internet connection being expensive af doesn't make Email non-free. You cannot possibly not see that your argument is flawed.

              I thought one already had to pay for SMS in order to get 2-factor authentication on popular websites. Google and Twitter, for example, won't let a user use TOTP as a second factor unless the user first sets up SMS. And nowadays, the next step up from pay-per-minute cellular tends to be a plan with more minutes and texts than the average subscriber knows what to do with.

              I'm not sure what kind of point you're trying to make, but it certainly doesn't sound like "SMS is free".

              But good luck convincing a major email provider to check log files for you.

              Fortunately, the bigger the mail hoster the higher the chance they have someone competent somewhere. The smaller the mail hoster, the more likely that someone actually reads mail for postmaster.

              • Your Internet connection being expensive af doesn't make Email non-free.

                Email over Internet is exactly as expensive as the Internet connection over which it runs.

                I'm not sure what kind of point you're trying to make, but it certainly doesn't sound like "SMS is free".

                Let me restate more simply: I'm under the impression that more cellular subscribers in the United States currently subscribe to unmetered SMS than to unmetered data.

                Fortunately, the bigger the mail hoster the higher the chance they have someone competent somewhere.

                Just because a mail service such as Gmail has someone competent doesn't mean that the service's users have a way to contact this competent person.

                • by fisted ( 2295862 )

                  Email over Internet is exactly as expensive as the Internet connection over which it runs.

                  That would only be true if all you ever did on the Internet was emailing, making that the sole reason for you to get said internet connection.
                  I'm getting tired of your bullshit arguments.

                  I'm under the impression that more cellular subscribers in the United States currently subscribe to unmetered SMS than to unmetered data.

                  SMS is a billion-dollar business (that's mostly because it's essentially free for the carrier). It doesn't matter whether or not it's metered, since you're paying for it implicitly. Oh and "unmetered SMS" is something you usually pay extra for.

                  Just because a mail service such as Gmail has someone competent doesn't mean that the service's users have a way to contact this competent person.

                  My point was that the competent person will likely reduce the likelihood of you n

                  • by tepples ( 727027 )

                    Email over Internet is exactly as expensive as the Internet connection over which it runs.

                    That would only be true if all you ever did on the Internet was emailing, making that the sole reason for you to get said internet connection.

                    It's also true if the user is fully using his cap for purposes other than email. In that case, adding email increases the overage proportional to the data volume of email.

                    Oh and "unmetered SMS" is something you usually pay extra for.

                    I am not disputing this. But in the same way, "unmetered data" is also something you usually pay extra for. I was under the impression that more smartphone users in the United States were already paying extra for unmetered SMS than paying extra for unmetered data.

                    Feel free to believe SMS is as free and decentral therefore resilient as Email is

                    Feel free to suggest a way to use the service that you call "free and decentr

                    • by fisted ( 2295862 )

                      Feel free to suggest a way to use the service that you call "free and decentral" without incurring additional monthly data use.

                      <)))><

  • This seems really improbable.

    I'd be shocked if even a tenth of e-mails are even opened.

  • by zifn4b ( 1040588 ) on Wednesday October 25, 2017 @10:42AM (#55430143)
    and you're just now thinking about email distribution to mobile as a possible marketing channel, just go out of business right now and do yourself a favor. I can't believe there are people in business that are THAT stupid and are still in business. We've had grids CSS at least going all the way back to YUI so that's for almost 10 years now. All the big players have been doing email marketing for years: Best Buy, Group On, Amazon and the list goes on and on. It's pretty much a standard part of any e-Commerce offering now and has been for quite some time. I just don't get it and I'm not the youngest person on the block either.
  • by TechyImmigrant ( 175943 ) on Wednesday October 25, 2017 @10:47AM (#55430171) Homepage Journal

    I might delete or open them on my phone, but if I have to reply, I do it on a computer with a keyboard.

    • Conspicuous by its absence from the featured article is what fraction of messages are composed on a smartphone. It turned out that the article is about newsletters, which are typically sent from a noreply address, as opposed to conversations for which a reply is expected.

    • by antdude ( 79039 )

      I rarely check my emails on my iPhone 4S since it is slow, annoying, hard to use, etc. I will do most of my e-mails and others on my old fashion computers.

  • I'm sure more email is deleted on a web or pc client. Who has time to long press every promotional email they want to delete and never read?
  • by Zorro ( 15797 )

    More like marked as Spam and deleted after I block the senders Domain.

  • It seems very strange to classify them as this or that. People can check their mail in many different ways.

    I have one account that I can, and do, check on my desktop, via webmail, and on my mobile. I normally access it via a desktop application and have rules on there that sort incoming mail. If I'm out I use my phone to check for anything important. And I use the webmail version to label messages as spam (or not) so my provider's spam detection system works better. Of course this would probably be counted

    • The difference is that native and web-based MUAs for desktop allow for replies longer than a paragraph, whereas native and web-based MUAs for smartphones don't except for the (presumably small) fraction of smartphone users who carry a Bluetooth keyboard everywhere. Otherwise, the practical actions on a smartphone are "delete after reading" if it's a newsletter and "mark this message for later action once I get to a desk" otherwise. Because the featured article is about newsletters, it implies that senders o

      • whereas native and web-based MUAs for smartphones don't except for the (presumably small) fraction of smartphone users who carry a Bluetooth keyboard everywhere.

        It helps when the keyboard is a full-sized, foldable keyboard (like the early 4-parts Stowaway by Thinkoutide, sometime branded).

        It also helps when the OS has been designed for note taking from the ground up (PalmOS back in the days)
        or is a full blown GNU/Linux where keyboard is natively supported (currently on Sailfish OS by Jolla).

        • by tepples ( 727027 )

          the (presumably small) fraction of smartphone users who carry a Bluetooth keyboard everywhere.

          It helps when the keyboard is a full-sized, foldable keyboard

          How many people do you see in practice carrying such "a full-sized, foldable keyboard" with them everywhere they go in case they need to reply to an email?

          (like the early 4-parts Stowaway by Thinkoutide, sometime branded).

          Did it look anything like Portable Folding External USB Wired Keyboard for Cell Phone / Tablet PC - Black [dx.com]?

          The real problem is that Matias jacked up the price of its Half Keyboard to $600.

          • How many people do you see in practice carrying such "a full-sized, foldable keyboard" with them everywhere they go in case they need to reply to an email?

            I do.
            But I don't mean that all smartphone maker should absolutely cater to my specific needs.
            I just mean that it's great that some OS manufacturer don't outright make it impossible,
            so the few of us who are interested can keep using it.

            (like the early 4-parts Stowaway by Thinkoutide, sometime branded).

            Did it look anything like Portable Folding External USB Wired Keyboard for Cell Phone / Tablet PC - Black [dx.com]?

            Yup, that's the technology. Geyes bought the license (and presumably some of the moulds).
            But I find the built quality of the Geyes a little bit less good that the original back when it was still ThinkOutisde.
            (My bluetooth ThinkOutside works perfectly. My Geyes has a few keys w

  • I'll quickly check my emails on my phone, but I almost always end up with the same emails in Outlook on the desktop, so I can respond well, organize the conversation, and create tasks or appointments related to the email.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    ... I've been told for years that email was dead! How the hell ca it be that it made the jump to mobile? Insanity!

  • Doesn't 55% seem too low? I probably open 95% of my emails on my phone first, because of the instant notification. Usually just a quick glance before I open up my desktop email client. How are they even tracking this? Does it take into consideration repeat views like in my case? Also, what about the email subject & snippet that is shown in a notification?

    It's gotten to the point where email is basically worthless anyway. You can't load images, because they are trying to track you. You can't ever

  • Only desktop has large local storage, which means 84% of users rely on someone else to store their private e-mails.

    What can possibly go wrong?

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