Follow Slashdot stories on Twitter

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Android Iphone Businesses Cellphones Google News Apple Hardware Technology

1 In 2 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Owners To Switch To iPhone 7, Says Analyst (softpedia.com) 212

Branding Brand recently conducted a post-recall study asking Samsung Galaxy Note 7 users which smartphones they would consider upgrading to. While 40 percent of them said they are ready to jump ship to a different manufacturer, 30 percent of respondents said they are likely going to be switching to the iPhone. However, according to one analyst, that number could be even higher. Softpedia reports: KGI analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said in a note to investors that approximately 50 percent of those who ordered a Note 7 are now very likely to go for an iPhone 7, as customer trust is collapsing in the Samsung ecosystem and all these buyers are no longer planning to stick with phones manufactured by the South Korean firm. Between 5 to 7 million Note 7 orders are likely to transfer to Apple, the analyst says, and the iPhone 7 Plus is expected to be the main model benefitting from this transition. Other Android phone manufacturers, including Huawei, are also likely to benefit from Samsung's fiasco, and Google itself could also record an increase in Pixel sales following the Note 7 demise. But Apple will certainly take the lion's share here, mostly thanks to the iPhone 7 Plus currently being positioned as a direct rival to the Note 7.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

1 In 2 Samsung Galaxy Note 7 Owners To Switch To iPhone 7, Says Analyst

Comments Filter:
  • pixel (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @08:04AM (#53098979)

    the pixel is the obvious replacement here. swapping ecosystems because of a bad phone??? doesn't make sense

    • Re:pixel (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Imazalil ( 553163 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @08:53AM (#53099311)

      I think a lot of people assume it's a Samsung ecosystem they're switching out of, not Android.

      I also think a lot of people, myself included, assume analysts are full of hot air.

      • Re:pixel (Score:4, Insightful)

        by alvinrod ( 889928 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @09:22AM (#53099559)

        I think a lot of people assume it's a Samsung ecosystem they're switching out of, not Android.

        That wouldn't surprise me. My mother doesn't really know or care to understand what Android is, but when she needs a new phone she's pretty insistent on getting another Motorola phone, so it's just a matter of finding one that they make that suits her needs. I recall seeing this a lot back in the early days of PC's where people would insist they needed another Compaq or $brand without really understanding that it didn't matter as the operating system was still the same and they could transfer their files and programs over. Even after explaining this to some people they're just overly hesitant to make a switch, even if they could be getting something more suited to their needs.

        I also think a lot of people, myself included, assume analysts are full of hot air.

        That goes without saying. Anyone who really understood how the market would behave wouldn't be blabbing about it for free on the internet. Instead they'd be keeping their mouth shut and buying and selling stocks and getting progressively more wealthy.

        • That goes without saying. Anyone who really understood how the market would behave wouldn't be blabbing about it for free on the internet. Instead they'd be keeping their mouth shut and buying and selling stocks and getting progressively more wealthy.

          I don't think it's much of a secret that when there are two main competitors in a market and one of them has a spectacular fail, the competition will primarily gain from it.

        • No. If you are an analyst, you make your trades, and then explain your thinking, hoping the market follows you. If you made a purchase, and then others continue to buy, the price moves up and your purchase is now worth more. If you sold, your stocks, then others sell, you can re-enter the position after it moves down.
        • by smartr ( 1035324 )

          That goes without saying. Anyone who really understood how the market would behave wouldn't be blabbing about it for free on the internet. Instead they'd be keeping their mouth shut and buying and selling stocks and getting progressively more wealthy.

          It's not a secret and the stock prices have already moved. This is the just writing on the wall. When your biggest, most direct competitor fails in such an epic way as to have a full and complete recall after the recall and additionally have its product banned from airports you are in a damn good position. I mean, no the iPhone 7 isn't meant to be used underwater. The Galaxy Note 7 isn't allowed on airplanes, and if you fly the airlines are notifying ALL OF THEIR PASSENGERS TO NOT USE A SAMSUNG PRODUCT, whi

      • I think a lot of people assume it's a Samsung ecosystem they're switching out of, not Android.

        I'm pretty sure that isn't true. That would be like saying that drivers that buy cars don't know they whether they are getting a sedan, SUV or truck. Most people test drive it before they dish out the money. In my surroundings I can only point at 1 or 2 mobile device users that don't know and don't care and they are all above 60 years old.

        Keep in mind that I still thing this analyst's numbers are way off.

    • swapping ecosystems because of a bad phone???

      I'm sure most of them haven't got any idea what an "ecosystem" is in terms of phones.

      All they want is a shiny new phone.

      • PS: Where can I buy a 'pixel'?

        • Hopefully they have this figured out better than they did previously, so that people can actually see one in a store.

          The average consumer still feels they have to go into a store and touch and feel a phone and won't just buy one online based on specs.

          • The average consumer still feels they have to go into a store and touch and feel a phone and won't just buy one online based on specs.

            And you say that like it's a bad thing? Does anyone still remember how the Pentium 4 had such a fast GHZ but was in fact, slower than the Pentium 3, especially the server versions of that CPU?

            Going by specs would be completely stupid.

          • by Geeky ( 90998 )

            I still prefer to see a phone in the flesh before I buy. A couple of mm here and there makes a big different to how it feels in the hand (no laughing at the back..), and I want to see how well made it feels.

      • I once chastised my wife, "how can you not be curious how the TV works?" and she replied "how can you not be curious how your circulatory system works?". And she was right.

        Do you think people who design bridges sit around complaining that "all these idiots driving over our bridges and they know nothing of the nuanced load bearing tradeoffs between suspension bridges and cable stayed--they just want to get to the other side". No, they don't, but for some reason we criticize people who don't care about the di

    • For many people (I guess more than 1 out of 2) the ecosystem doesn't matter. What they have on their phone is a bunch of free apps. Also I expect many of these Note users were Previous Apple users who was looking for something new.

      However for most of the people who really don't care there isn't that much difference.

      • Re:pixel (Score:4, Insightful)

        by tripleevenfall ( 1990004 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @09:38AM (#53099691)

        I think the average consumer feels it's Coke vs Pepsi. A few people violently care, but most people don't really care at all.

    • the "obvious replacement" that isn't actually available to buy. They need a phone *now* because the one they have is either in an asbestos box on the slow boat back to Korea, or in danger of immolating their pants / car / house / etc.

      • My question was primarily this - what are the 70% of Note users who are not switching to the iPhone 7 doing? People buy a Note because they want a phablet. They aren't going to downgrade to a smaller phone, most likely.

        I know it will be pooh-poohed on Slashdot, but losing 30% of the users of your flagship product is NOT trivial.

        • by ranton ( 36917 )

          My question was primarily this - what are the 70% of Note users who are not switching to the iPhone 7 doing? People buy a Note because they want a phablet. They aren't going to downgrade to a smaller phone, most likely.

          That is exactly the problem my wife had with replacing her Note 7. There simply are no competing products for the Note. She either had to downgrade to a 5.5" screen with no stylus, or go back to a Note 4/5. It is quite painful to pay $700+ for a phone released a year ago, so she went with a $250 refurbished Note 4.

          In the end this fiasco cost us about $50 and a lot of hassle, since we traded in her old Note 4 for only $200.

        • Sticking with my Note 4 until something better comes along. Pixel XL certainly isn't it. I'm hoping Samsung throws every good engineer they have into pushing the Note 8 out in Q1.

    • The amazon "fire" phone seems apropos.

    • by bondsbw ( 888959 )

      Ecosystem doesn't really seem to be that big of a deal anymore. With a few exceptions (admittedly some of them are deal-breakers), you can find the same apps on Android and iOS and you can do the same kind of stuff on both platforms.

      I prefer Android so I can tweak it just right, but ease of sharing photos with my family (who all use iOS) is enough of a boon for me to use iPhone. If I switch I'll probably encourage everyone to use a cross-platform photo sharing service, but you know how that goes... I'll b

    • What exactly about the Google ecosystem do you feel is locking people in? What do people lose when they switch from Google to iPhone? Just curious what you are referring to exactly. Conversely, what would prevent someone from being able to just switch back to Google if they tried owning an iPhone and found they did not like it more?
  • Not equivelent (Score:3, Interesting)

    by JasterBobaMereel ( 1102861 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @08:08AM (#53099007)

    So people who picked the Galaxy Note 7 over the Galaxy 7, would go for the much smaller iPhone7 ?

    • by Xest ( 935314 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @08:14AM (#53099047)

      Yes, all 3 of them.

    • You don't seem to understand. Everyone now knows that Samsung is the evil devil and Apple is their saviour who could do no wrong. Samsung's phones explode because the company is actively trying to kill off it's foreign customers. If an iPhone ever exploded it would be entirely because the user was containing the energy wrong.

      • You don't seem to understand. Everyone now knows that Samsung is the evil devil and Apple is their saviour who could do no wrong.

        Would that it was that simple. But operating systems aside, lets look at the situation. Its no doubt that people are really addicted to their smartphones, whatever their brand is.

        So disregarding the brand or OS, just how favorably are you going to look upon a phone that easily combusts, that you have to send it back in a special box, and worst of all, you have to be without a phone for a little while.

        I fell badly for Samsung. The battery aspect of all phones is a big problem, especially with marketing

        • Easily combusts?

          I hope we get a more detailed analysis of what the cause of the failures was and what the likely lifetime failure rate was.

          It would be a shame if Samsung has to destroy all those beautiful Note 7's, perhaps they'll show up in foreign markets with a new battery eventually.

          • They already did the "new battery" and those combusted too.

            Don't you think that if it was as easy as swapping a battery pack, they would still be selling them and not eating what could be a $5B disaster?

            This is a problem of fundamental design, or else it would have been fixed and they would still be on the market.

            • This is a problem of fundamental design, or else it would have been fixed and they would still be on the market.

              Some times we press the limits, some time we go past them. This is one of those times.

              There are some chemistry physics that we are pressing up against, and when dealing with energy density, the more we put into something, the more it wants to get out. So as we incorporate more energy, the effort to contain it becomes paramount. And we are hamstringing ourselves as we try to reduce all the other parameters - Thickness, weight, wireless charging - while increasing the stored energy. Yikes! A recipe for gre

              • You would hope so, and in some organizations that happens. I've sit in on a few engineering discussions where a response was being created to a "marketing requirements document" for a new product. You would be surprised (or maybe not, I don't know) at some of the shit that marketeers ask for when dreaming up products. And the engineering team gets to respond to these "requirements" often by saying things like "if some massive breakthrough in materials science happens in the next month, which allows for a

                • By the way, that's usually the flowery language that gets sent to marketing, after everyone has a good laugh and a guessing game at what they might be smoking when they came up with the MRD.

                  In my first ever "real" job, I was working on some wideband RF amps. These were high performance CATV trunking amps. Our VP was one of these marketing types. Well we were having trouble making the Cross modulation and second order specs on a batch. He comes down to visit, and asks what the problm is.

                  "Whats th issue with those amplifiers?"

                  They can't quite make the specs for Cross mod and second order."

                  Oh - that's simple then. Just get them to make the specs for cross mod and second order."

                  I wanted

            • by tlhIngan ( 30335 )

              This is a problem of fundamental design, or else it would have been fixed and they would still be on the market.

              It's likely a rushed design - there are reports that Samsung accelerated the release of the Note 7 so it could take the wind out of Apple's sails by having the Note 7 out and plentiful when the iPhone 7 was announced.

              So there could very well be fundamental flaws in the hardware because the urgency was to get it finished and manufactured in time for mass distribution by the Apple keynote (which hap

              • Hopefully this is a lesson that is studied and learned across many market segments: rush a release just to take the jam out of a competitor's donut, and you might end up cutting a corner that costs the company $5B in real costs, and far more in intangible costs (damage to brand, reduced customer loyalty, etc.)

        • but dammit customers want a long battery life.

          ...and fast charging times. But with the S7's power-hog of a design (twice the battery of the iPhone 7, for only 6% better run-time, and actually LESS run-time than the iPhone 7 Plus!) means that Samsung had to not only "tickle the Dragon's tail", but to insert a finger or two up the Dragon's ass to try and get reasonably close to the iPhone's two hour charge time with their nearly 4,000 mAh battery. And the result exploded in their face, as the Dragon awoke to find that it was being anally-violated...

      • You don't seem to understand. Everyone now knows that Samsung is the evil devil and Apple is their saviour who could do no wrong. Samsung's phones explode because the company is actively trying to kill off it's foreign customers. If an iPhone ever exploded it would be entirely because the user was containing the energy wrong.

        I thought this entire exploding Samsung phone thing was Apples fault? Pray, enlighten me oh bitter and hateful one... I am confused.

    • Yeah, I don't get it either... not only is the phone smaller, but the features are far FAR more limited. It's like replacing your Tesla with a Tricycle.

      If anything, the people switching to iPhones were originally iPhone users that switched to Android and got the wrong impression based on faulty hardware.
    • the iPhone 7 Plus is expected to be the main model benefitting from this transition.

      So when they say they're switching to the iPhone 7, they're really saying they're switching from Android to iPhone. The iPhone 7 Plus (5.5" screen) is only a little smaller than the Galaxy Note 7 (5.7" screen), and larger than the Galaxy 7 (5.1" screen).

  • Um, no. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by war4peace ( 1628283 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @08:10AM (#53099025)

    There is such a thing called "ecosystem lockdown" or however you want to call it.
    Be it from getting used to where stuff is, how UX works or whether you paid for shit (apps, games, etc).
    Also there's a big difference between what people say will do and what they will actually do.

    • There's also a huge difference between what analysts say and reality.

    • Re:Um, no. (Score:5, Informative)

      by cmseagle ( 1195671 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @08:28AM (#53099123)
      The analyst cited in the article has a pretty good repuation [cultofmac.com] (Google him). Doesn't seem prudent to outright reject his projections because you disagree with them.
      • by ttsai ( 135075 )

        The analyst cited in the article has a pretty good repuation [cultofmac.com] (Google him). Doesn't seem prudent to outright reject his projections because you disagree with them.

        Ming-Chi Kuo has an amazing reputation predicting future Apple products. There is zero history of predictions about sales and consumer preferences, which are completely different. No Apple insider or supply chain source can help shed light on that.

    • by SirSlud ( 67381 )

      I would argue that the majority of people are not really aware of the implications of switching ecosystems unless they've switched in the past, or don't use them to the extent that it is too much of a bother.

      • Anectodal evidence: I never switched scosystems.
        Small sample statistical evidence: the dozens of people I talked to around the "Apple versus Android" topic all named "ecosystem" as the biggest switch prevention reason. Some reasons below (randomly ordered):
        - "my data is in the google Cloud" (pictures, contacts, calendar, files)
        - "I bought this or that app"
        - "I am used to the menus"
        - "Android sucks" / "Apple sucks".

    • If you what something that's 95% of a Note 7, you're going to get a S7 Edge. Same great camera, same IP68, nearly the same UX (and nearly identical after Nougat), same edge functionality, uSD storage, same great battery life, and works with the 2-3 bonus gifts you got (Active watch, uSD card, Gear VR).

      If you are pissed as Samsung and don't want to "reward them," you'll be getting either a Pixel or an LG V20. Both are fresh off the line (not some "old, tired" model from 6 months ago, like the S7E), come with

    • by T.E.D. ( 34228 )
      Perhaps. But as a 5-year Samsung user, I can tell you that Samsung isn't there. I'm a little there with Android, but I could care less about any one particular Android vendor.
      • Same here, I had HTC and Samsung phones, my wife's tablet is a Nexus built by LG, my brother-in-law also owns an LG tablet.
        None of us care about the brand, but what the device has to offer.

    • This:

      Also there's a big difference between what people say will do and what they will actually do.

      As Brexit showed us, Westerners have grown very comfortable (and now even enjoy in Durdenesque way) lying to pollsters.

      This is why the specter of Trump still worries me; he's not behind enough.

  • Your new Hyundai sedan might randomly explode, so after you return it you are likely to buy a Harley motorcycle instead???

    Not related: I used to buy most things samsung until about 1-2 years ago (2 monitors, phones, AC, Plasma Smart TV, home theater, external USB drives etc), but after their support treated me badly on the Smart TV and my Galaxy phone stopped getting updates relatively soon (with the last one being subpar), I vowed to never buy Samsung again - for phones I switched to Xiaomi...

  • . . . .there are, or WERE three choices: the Galaxy Note 7, the iPhone 7, and the Pixel.

    With the Samsung, pulled, that leaves 2 remaining choices. A 50-50 split is pretty much expected, all things being equal. But, as noted elsewhere, at least with the Pixel, you're still in the Android ecosystem. . .

    • Which shops sell Pixels?

      • by Salgak1 ( 20136 )

        I know that Ting Wireless [ting.com] sells them online. . .

        Me, I refuse to pay the Bleeding Edge Tax. I'm currently upgrading the family's Galaxy S3s to Galaxy S5's . . it's all about balancing capability with cost. . .

    • I'm not sure what characteristics you are using for inclusion in your choices, there are other phones with similar hardware. For example, the LG V20.

  • by fuzzyf ( 1129635 ) on Tuesday October 18, 2016 @08:29AM (#53099127)
    Switching from Galaxy Note 7 to an Amazon Fire Phone... *ba-dum-tshh*

    ... I'll see myself out ...
  • I honestly think that this is an opportunity for BLU to make inroads, I use an unlocked and rooted BLU Phone, and I like the Vanilla AOSP feel of the units, the fact the units have a Removable battery, Two SIM card slots, and an SD Card. They are cheaper, and work well with third party online applications like OwnCloud, and eGroupware.

    However many retail locations are discontinuing them. Cyanogen Mod only supports certain models of them. I've seen some Youtubers praise these phones as being close to Parity

  • The big selling point for the Note for me was the stylus. Does the iPhone even have a stylus? I think what this survey proves is that people just mindlessly go for the biggest newest shiniest thing.
  • From the aritcle:

    "A study that was conducted recently by Branding Brand revealed that 40 percent of Samsung customers who ordered a Note 7 are ready to jump ship to a different manufacturer, with 30 percent of respondents explaining that the iPhone is very likely to be their next destination. Only 8 percent of them picked the Google Pixel, but what's good for the ecosystem is that 62 percent of the users said they wanted to stick with Android."
  • Samsung could clearly and verifiably show what the real issue is with the Note 7, which they have not done yet. And then show that it was completely solved and safe in the Note 8.

    Plus ship the Note 8 with a fully unlocked Bootloader, so that we can easily install crapware-free ROM's such as CyanogenMod.

    There are a lot of good things to like about the Samsung Galaxy Note series, including phablet size, stylus, and display.

  • by nomadic ( 141991 )
    I used to switch between iPhones and android every time I switched phones, and it had zero to do with specific models. I just got annoyed enough at whatever mobile OS I was using to switch. Now I'm sticking with Android. Both OSes annoy me, but at least with Android I can avoid the obnoxious Apple aesthetic.
  • Not that I ever used it, but my TV annoyed me with a notification this evening about the Samsung Link service ending on November 1. The timing isn't exactly great for a company that needs to instill confidence in its ecosystem in the wake of its flagship smartphone becoming a complete disaster.

Real programmers don't comment their code. It was hard to write, it should be hard to understand.

Working...