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Motorola Planning 2GHz Android Phone For Later This Year 183

Posted by Soulskill
from the soon-we-can-expand-crysis-jokes-to-phones dept.
rocket97 writes "On Wednesday, at the Executives Club of Chicago, Motorola CEO Sanjay Jha reportedly decided to chat about the relatively near future of the mobile landscape as he sees it — which, in part, includes the ultimate demise of mobile computers in favor of highly-capable smartphones. This being his vision, Jha discussed Motorola's plans for a smartphone with a 2GHz processor — by the end of this year. While Jha did not want to divulge any further information, Conceivably Tech cites another anonymous Motorola executive who was a little more chatty, talking up a device intended to 'incorporate everything that is technologically possible in a smartphone today.'"
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Motorola Planning 2GHz Android Phone For Later This Year

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  • So? (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward

    Haven't even the marketing types learned by now.that Ghz is a measure of frequency, not speed?

    • Re:So? (Score:5, Funny)

      by Pharmboy (216950) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:31PM (#32538168) Journal

      Haven't even the marketing types learned by now.that Ghz is a measure of frequency, not speed?

      But it's TWO Ghz! It's rated at TWICE the bogomips, it has to be faster! This is so fast, I can start talking before I even dial the number! Believe me, when it comes to talking on a phone, this faster CPU will make it much, much better!!!!!1

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by city (1189205)
        You still talk on your phone? I mean I guess it has that feaure... my phone's app for that isn't so good though. I do however hardly need my home computer anymore.
      • by mcvos (645701)

        But it's TWO Ghz! It's rated at TWICE the bogomips, it has to be faster! This is so fast, I can start talking before I even dial the number! Believe me, when it comes to talking on a phone, this faster CPU will make it much, much better!!!!!1

        Don't forget that it also means half the calling costs. Will save a lot of money when traveling abroad.

    • by mykos (1627575)
      It's a measure of speed in this case because it's an apples to apples comparison. They're all the same kind of processor.
      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        No they are not, for instance the OMAP used in the droid if clocked to say 800Mhz is now going to be equivalent to the 1Ghz snapdragon found in the incredible. This does not even get into the different GPUs found on these vastly different SOCs.

  • by AdmiralXyz (1378985) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:23PM (#32537980)
    "Ow, my hand!"
  • 2Ghz what? (Score:5, Informative)

    by h4rr4r (612664) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:23PM (#32537994)

    Which ARM variant is it?

    Ghz ain't everything.

  • by darkmeridian (119044) <william.chuang@[ ]il.com ['gma' in gap]> on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:25PM (#32538030) Homepage

    I had the Razr and the Moto Q. It seems like Motorola has the crappiest and most confusing user interfaces ever. If they were loading pure Android, that'd be great. However, Moto customizes the OS with something called "MotoBlur." I assume that this would be a crap firmware/UI. This would prevent the latest Android OS from being used. Also, a two GHz processor sounds great but the impact on battery life will probably outweigh any benefits in a smart phone.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:27PM (#32538070)

      on the other hand Motorola Droid is stock Android

      • by rreyelts (470154)
        The Samsung Moment (what my wife uses) is also stock Android. Surprisingly, that didn't seem to improve the rate at which a new version of Android for her phone became available through official channels. My HTC Hero has SenseUI, and the updates for both phones came out at the same time.
    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      The Droid did not have that. It has pretty much plain vanilla. Either way if they would not use a bootloader that wants signed roms this would not be an issue. For some damn reason they want to prevent you from actually owning your own hardware on most models though.

      • by Lumpy (12016)

        That said.... Any android based phones out there not made by an ASSHAT company that hates it's customers?

        You know, Let's me install whatever OS I want without a signed, encrypted and bow-tied bootloader

        If I want to install android 2.6 Release 3 on it or maybe another linux?

        For some reason both HTC and Motorola hate the customer by making it impossible to install a non-blessed OS.

        • by h4rr4r (612664)

          Droid, Nexus One, G1.

          That is one Moto and two HTC.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Rennt (582550)

          HTC don't hate their customers. You are just confused about who their customers are.

          Nexus One: Customer = You = Hackable device
          Desire: Customer = Network Provider = Locked down

          Same phone, different customer requirements.

          • by mcvos (645701)

            You are just confused about who their customers are.

            Nexus One: Customer = You = Hackable device

            Desire: Customer = Network Provider = Locked down

            That doesn't explain why the Milestone is locked down, though. The Verizon version (the Droid) is not locked down, but the one bought directly by consumers (the Milestone) is locked down. It's really bizarre.

        • You can get the original Droid for $20 + 2 year contract on Amazon. I just bought one last week and rooted it yesterday, installed Bugless Beast w/Froyo and it's running great. Very easy process.

        • by Pharmboy (216950)

          I am not as freaked out about phone companies locking down the operating system as say Tivo or Playstation. When using the phone, you pretty much have to use their network for all functions, so your own home rolled and badly designed operating system can actually cause issues for them, and they don't want (and can't) support an unknown operating system. If Playstation (Wii, etc.) wants to bar you from their networks if you change the OS, then fine, but it can be run as a stand alone system, just like Tiv

          • by h4rr4r (612664)

            It cannot cause them issues STOP SPREADING THIS BS. You only get to talk AT to the phone hardware, that is it. Just like when I use a verizon usb wireless in my laptop running my own home rolled and badly designed operating system.

            You may want to educate yourself on how this technology works before opening your mouth or putting fingers to keyboard

            • by Vegeta99 (219501)

              I dunno, man. When I had a TyTn II, I could replace the radio firmware. I guarantee ya I could have caused havoc for AT&T if I wanted.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Darkness404 (1287218)
      Owning a BackFlip, I've had to use MotoBlur, it isn't as bad as you think. All MotoBlur really lets you do is add in different widgets with Facebook, Twitter, etc. but you can be like me and not even put in that info and not use MotoBlur and its pretty much like stock Android (only there is all that AT&T crap...)

      In fact, MotoBlur isn't too bad because its supposed to work like a free version of MobileME, letting you remotely track/deactivate your phone should it be stolen.

      The main problem with M
      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        That last point is the real problem. If 3rd party roms are available it does not matter though.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by pitchpipe (708843)

      It seems like Motorola has the crappiest and most confusing user interfaces ever. If they were loading pure Android, that'd be great. However, Moto customizes the OS with something called "MotoBlur."

      What's wrong with that? It does exactly as the name implies, it 'blurs' the clarity of the user interface.

    • by mcvos (645701)

      I had the Razr and the Moto Q. It seems like Motorola has the crappiest and most confusing user interfaces ever. If they were loading pure Android, that'd be great. However, Moto customizes the OS with something called "MotoBlur."

      Fortunately they didn't put it on their current flagships: the Droid and Milestone.

      What I am afraid of, is that they're going to lock the bootloader like they did with the Milestone, making it really hard to put your own custom Android version on it. They did that with the Milestone, and it's a really sucky idea. (Otherwise the Milestone would have been the greatest piece of hardware ever.)

  • Carrier problems (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Darkness404 (1287218) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:28PM (#32538106)
    The main problems with this though will be carriers. Its becoming increasingly apparent you can't have 2 year carrier-paid phones and be remotely on the cutting edge. Someone who got the first Android phone released in the US on a 2 year contract still couldn't upgrade it at a lower price. With the iPhone releasing a new phone every year and Android improving by leaps and bounds every other month it seems like, there is just no way that this can't end up with hardware fragmentation because a 528 Mhz Backflip just can't run the same things a 1 Ghz Nexus One or the new Motorola phone at 2 Ghz and the trend for hardware still isn't getting faster and faster, AT&T still only has the Backflip which is really underpowered when compared to the rest of the high end phones which are not on AT&t.
    • by h4rr4r (612664) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:33PM (#32538216)

      On smartphones the update period is often 18 months, verizon does that anyway.
        AT&T does not want any phone that would outshine the iPhone, so don't expect any nice android phones there.

      Hardware fragmentation is the only alternative to stagnation. This is no more an issue than people having different age/power computers. Normal stuff like email and web browsers will work for everyone and spiffy 3d games will just like on pc only run on the latest and greatest.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by rreyelts (470154)

      Sprint has something called "premiere" status. It gives you the traditional 2-year phone discount for a contract renewal at an accelerated 1-year rate. Getting premiere status is just a matter of having a qualifying mobile plan, which is pretty easy to meet when you have a smartphone. (I.E. most, if not all, of their unlimited data plans qualify you).

      Still, I bought the HTC Hero (Android) when it first came out (October '09), and now I'm drooling over the EVO. This is even after I upgraded my Hero to Ecla

      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        Awesome, do they charge extra to get the next phone?
        Verizon will let me do new after 1 in a similar fashion but removes my $100 credit towards a new phone and charges like $80 or so as an early upgrade fee.

        • by rreyelts (470154)
          I'm not personally aware of any extra fees (YMMV and IANAL). Sprint's legalese always seems to reserve the right to charge you an activation fee (~$35) any time you upgrade your phone regardless of circumstances, but my own experience is that I am usually not charged that fee.
  • by 0123456 (636235) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:30PM (#32538136)

    So we're going to be carrying around phones the size of laptops? Personally I'd rather carry a phone that's just a phone, and a laptop when I need one... it's bad enough that you can barely find a phone without a camera anymore, for those who aren't allowed cameras where they work.

    Obviously one day human/computer interfaces are going to reach the point where they're more efficient than a keyboard, a decently-sized LCD display and mouse, but I can't see that happening for a long time yet.

    • For you, perhaps you can't have a camera, for every other person, the ability to always have a camera on them is a huge benefit, especially if it takes decent pictures.

      And for another, think about just emulation. Already, my 528Mhz Backflip can emulate even GBA games without too many glitches, with a 2 Ghz system, you are talking about emulating things like PlayStation and other later-gen games, and if it can emulate that, developers can surely make more impressive games running natively on it.

      with
      • by h4rr4r (612664)

        Playstation can be done on far less hardware, there is a playstation emulator for the nicer phones coming out very soon.

      • by 0123456 (636235)

        with a keyboard, captive touchscreen, trackball, 3/4G and Wi-Fi, and a fast CPU, there is very little you can't do with the phone.

        That's rather my point: if you do all that then it's no longer a phone, it's a best a small laptop which can make the occasional phone call... and small keyboards are useless for the average user for anything more sophisticated than sending the occasional email. Even my netbook keyboard is painful to use for word processing for long.

        So the only way that phones are going to replace laptops in the near future is by becoming small laptops with poor ergonomics.

    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      Why would they be the size of laptops?
      My droid will go up to 1.2Ghz with no real issues, it still fits in my pocket. At that speed it shit stomps the not so "incredible".

    • by Jeff DeMaagd (2015) on Friday June 11, 2010 @02:00PM (#32538722) Homepage Journal

      Basic phones are getting rarer, but they aren't that hard to find. I found this article a few minutes ago, supposedly updated today:

      http://reviews.cnet.com/best-basic-phones/ [cnet.com]

      Oddly, the top entry has a camera, a goof on their part.

      The thing is that people that reject the cameras are a small enough market that it might not be worth giving much attention to.

      • by Patch86 (1465427)

        My current phone was a replacement for my poor deceased previous phone (which met it's untimely end at the hands of a cup of coffee), purchased for £12 from the supermarket.

        Nokia 1661. No camera. But it does have a flashlight, FM radio, usual selection of calculator/calendar/snake/whathaveyou. And it makes phone calls/texts. Cheap, durable, purchased with no contract or anything like that.

        Don't get me wrong, I intend to replace it properly soon enough. But just to point out that they are out there in

  • Power locked away (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Microlith (54737)

    I wonder if this device will end up like the Milestone and pretty much all other Android-based Motorola devices, locked down via TrustZone to prevent the user from actually doing what they want with it.

    But I suppose that's the price you pay when patronizing companies that treat the end-user as the enemy.

    • by h4rr4r (612664)

      Milestone can load other kernels, this is why kexec exists.

      The Droid does not have that issue. Nor does the Nexus One.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:39PM (#32538308)

    Specifications are useless without the design and the status. My equation is simple. If Apple makes it, it is worth buying. If anyone else does, no thanks.

    Think Different.
    Think Better.
    Think Apple.

  • by divisionbyzero (300681) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:39PM (#32538324)

    in engineering. You can always have everything you want. I'm surprised the world hasn't been perfected yet. :-/ Come on, something has to give somewhere. This announcement is worse than vapor. It's vapor that can never exist. Lame.

    • Come on, something has to give somewhere. This announcement is worse than vapor. It's vapor that can never exist. Lame.

      You must have missed the last few seasons of 24. Jack Bauer had a phone that never dropped a call (even on airplanes, choppers, and in subway tunnels), never had a dead battery, and had 3D animations instantaneously transferred from Chloe and rendered on his phone in real time. Apparently Motorola has been holding out on the rest of us.

    • Worse than vapor, just idiotic...

      Motorola CEO Sanjay Jha reportedly decided to chat about the relatively near future of the mobile landscape as he sees it -- which, in part, includes the ultimate demise of mobile computers in favor of highly-capable smartphones.

      This guy obviously doesn't do most of his own actual work, but rather has some flunkies standing by to translate his ideas and words into actual documents. Smartphones will never replace laptops, unless they get a larger screen - say around maybe 12 inches - and a closer to full-sized keyboard, and maybe a mouse pad. I know I can edit documents and spreadsheets on my smart phone, but I really don't want to.

      Now, I'm interested in his ideas about flying cars...

  • by alta (1263) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:48PM (#32538502) Homepage Journal

    Why does it have to be android? I read the summary, nowhere does it say android. Maybe moto already has a deal to license iOS.

    Maybe the subject could read "Moto to make 2Ghz iOS phone by the end of the year" Someone's assuming it's android, aren't they?

    Take "Android" out of title to be accurate. :p

    Yeah I know... it's probably android. I'm just in a bad mood ;) And no way apple would license.

    • by mcvos (645701)

      You act like the summary is TFA, and the title is the summary. RTFA before you go bitching.

  • by Overzeetop (214511) on Friday June 11, 2010 @01:49PM (#32538514) Journal

    Sure, there will be niche, but I think we've just entered the penis measurement realm here. Personally, I'm going to be impressed when one of these devices can be charged once a week, not every night.* 2GHz will be nice at times - don't get me wrong - but I'm more interested in how little power it will take when in an active sleep state, and how well it will throttle back for background apps. This is no better than that stupid, non-standard 640x960, too-small-to-be-useful screen that Apple is putting on their new phone.

    Perhaps Adobe should figure out how to make flash less processor intensive, rather than having to beef up every mobile processor and suck the battery dry to play video/games with poorly optimized code.

    All apologies to the seventeen developers who plan on using their new android phones as their primary workstation.

    *Yes, both my iPhone and my HTC Fuze can last more than a day, but two days is really pressing your luck if you find you really need them towards the end of the second day.

    • by AresTheImpaler (570208) on Friday June 11, 2010 @02:23PM (#32539106)
      here's a pic of the 300+dpi screen compared to anon 300+dpi iphone:
      linky [mobilecrunch.com]
      I know that it's not as amazing that apple wants to make it sound, but the pixel density is awesome and would help a lot on applications that have lots of text. Hell it's great for pictures too.
    • by gilesjuk (604902)

      Flash would need hardware assistance to run well on mobiles, by well I mean with little CPU or battery life

      But once you add hardware assistance you tend to set some technical limitations that mean future changes wouldn't always be possible.

  • Personally, don't need a camera, but I would like:
    1. The phone to be bigger. I'm thinking 50% bigger than a blackberry.
    2. Be mostly touchscreen, but still have some actual buttons
    3. Drop rated. I'm mean to phones.
    4. BIG battery - part of the bigger size
    5. Larger antenna - I hang out in low signal areas
    6. Bluetooth - won't normally use the phone's microphone/speakers, but use a BT headset most of the time.

  • I hope this does not degenerate to the speed wars of the PC kind. Where one could buy a 20 million GHZ computer with a 1 MHz frontside bus and hard drive with a transfer rate of 1 kb per minute $100. Then we would hear how stupid we were for buy another computer for $1,000 that only ran at 1 GHZ.

    I mean, for a phone the least important spec is how fast the CPU runs. Since phone use is much more graphical, I am more interested in what the GPU is doing.

  • Keep in mind the process shink to >45nm is coming later this year; that will get us to these faster speeds as well as improved power consumption. Think Pentium 4 vs later procs for an example of this in action.

    I'm wondering if Android and Android apps are ready for dual-core platforms. A 2gHz single core phone may be a better option than a dual 1gHz core, depending on that situation. If not, I'm sure next year's big Android release (2.4?) should be ready for it, since those dual-core Qualcomm SoCs are al

  • Geez. That'll burn a hole in your pocket faster than your Apple iFund (the money with which you purchase iProducts).

  • I'm guessing this 2GHz processor is required to run all those bad flash games that have been ported using Adobe's dev tools.

    I've never picked up a phone and thought "wow this phone is too slow", the network's 3G data connection is what always slows things down.

  • While more GHz is nice because if offers more processing power what people really care about is what it can do. Having more power for the sake of more power is just dick measuring, features are what sell products.

    Personally I would love to get my hands on an android phone that can play any multimedia I throw at it. I want to be able to download 1080p-720p video like I usually watch on the desktop, and be able to watch it on my smartphone without this transcoding nonsense (come on Dell put the Streak's 5" sc

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