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Handhelds Programming

Nokia Releases Qt SDK For Mobile Development 76

Posted by timothy
from the utterly-cute dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Nokia has released its unified Qt-based SDK for cross-platform development for Symbian and MeeGo (plus Maemo) devices. The blurb reads: 'Today sees the release of the Nokia Qt SDK, a single easy-to-use software development kit (SDK) for Symbian and Meego application development. Developers can now develop, test, and deploy native applications for Nokia smartphones and mobile computers. The beta version of the SDK is available for download from today, ready for developers to kick off development for new devices, including the just-announced Nokia N8.'"
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Nokia Releases Qt SDK For Mobile Development

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  • Can this be what Symbian needs to stop sucking shite up a straw? As an E71 user, I say no. Even if it could produce cold fusion and showers of unicorns it still wouldn't be halfway there.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      No, but it could be what Nokia needs to transition Symbian developers to Maemo/Meego instead of losing them all to Android.

      When done right, crossplatform is always good, even if you've got no use for one of the platforms.

      • by MrNaz (730548) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:53PM (#32022498) Homepage

        Qt plus Nokia's commitment to open source plus Nokia's affinity for Python I think will make it the overall winner, despite being behind in the smartphone development race. Building apps using Qt+Pyside should be far nicer and allow for a very modern programming approach with fewer mobile-specific development skills necessary given that Python+Qt are a very common combination for desktop apps as well.

        Also, Nokia is the only company that seems to be doing the open source mobile platform right. Android is only half open source, and realistically, it's only open to OEMs. Garage developers are about as welcome in Google's ecosystem as herpes.

    • Why the flaming? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Ilgaz (86384) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:04PM (#32022672) Homepage

      I have a E/1 too and I will just ask one question. First of all, you know E71 has upgrade, E72 with basically twice the processing power and free RAM with extras like compass... It is basically iPhone 3GS compared to 3G. So, our devices are previous generation.

      Did you even try Qt demos, very early alpha ones from qt.nokia.com blogs? Or, did you use your devices unique advantages like absurdly long battery life, multi tasking, free navigation, open platform?

      Yes, any company these days can invent cold fusion and nobody will be impressed and the will line up for iPad instead but it doesn't change how huge change this represents in mobile space and even open source.

  • Alternatives to C++ (Score:1, Interesting)

    by CondeZer0 (158969)

    I wish Nokia provided some better alternatives to C++ for development on Symbian.

    Java [cat-v.org] is not any better (and in many ways worse), and the S60 python port is nice, but it doesn't quite cut it for writing things like games in such limited hardware.

    I would love to be able to build Symbian apps in Google's Go, it is an ideal language for secure, fast, lightweight programs for mobile apps.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by soppsa (1797376)
      Oh god... I am totally not shocked to see that the bio on your homepage lists your occupation as philosopher. If you were a software developer I would have been quite confused by your statements...
    • by TejWC (758299) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:34PM (#32022166)

      You will probably want PySide [pyside.org] since it gives all Qt functions to Python and was written with mobile devices in mind. It is not "done" yet but there is just enough for you to get your hands dirty with.

    • by Ilgaz (86384) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:40PM (#32022284) Homepage

      If Google is serious about Go language, they can release its SDK for Symbian as soon as tomorrow and I bet its runtime will even be "featured" on Nokia's "Ovi" (App) store.

      We aren't speaking about Apple here, everything is open and free. Nokia currently features "Locago", a J2ME competitor to their own, multi billion maps application.

      For example, MS already released an alpha (or beta) of Silverlight for S60 along with SDK. Adobe Flash 10 is next to come.

    • by loufoque (1400831) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:42PM (#32022314)

      I wish Nokia provided some better alternatives to C++ for development on Symbian.

      If you don't like that language, just use another language that compiles to it (or a subset of it). Most languages can be compiled to C.
      Nothing should even prevent you from compiling to machine code in most cases.

      I would love to be able to build Symbian apps in Google's Go, it is an ideal language for secure, fast, lightweight programs for mobile apps.

      Now you're just trying to be cool and trendy. You should have mentioned Erlang to get extra cool points.
      You can write perfectly secure, fast and lightweight programs in C++. Actually, you can code however you want in C++, since it's basically a meta-language: feel free to reinvent a language within the language; not that the standard dialect -- which, ironically enough, is little used -- is any bad though.

      • Hmm, GHC (Haskell’s compiler) has a project to make it compile on ARM. I heard that they are already pretty far.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      I would love to be able to build Symbian apps in Google's Go, it is an ideal language for secure, fast, lightweight programs for mobile apps.

      Why is go so much better? As far as I can tell it is no lighter than C++ (it has garbage collection which implies some non-trivial runtime) and it lacks parameterized types. It does have multi-programming (as does C++0x, and the variants of C++ and C on many common compilers via openmp), and fast compiles.

      But, I don't see any particular advantage.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Ecyrd (51952)

      I do believe there's a go compiler already for the N900 - at least I recall seeing it in the repos.

    • by npsimons (32752) *

      I wish Nokia provided some better alternatives to C++ for development on Symbian.

      Come to Maemo/Meego! It's got Perl out of the box, and Python and C++ are just a few taps away. Packages for Ruby and Go are in repositories. I've also heard murmurings about Erlang, Java, etc. As this is an open platform, the sky's the limit, and I'm sure more and more languages will keep showing up.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Klivian (850755)

      I wish Nokia provided some better alternatives to C++ for development on Symbian.

      That is exactly what they just did! The way Qt extends C++ gives you a fast and powerful development environment, surpassing plain C++ big time.

  • ...will it blend ??
  • I think this makes Android the only open platform left for QT to get into. Someone already started work too:
    http://code.google.com/p/android-lighthouse/ [google.com]

    • by scorp1us (235526)

      You can use the NDK to make a C++ application library (your application class) and use a sub Java loader to load it.

      Word has it Qt already works thanks to light house.

  • does this mean it's going to be possible to get a GUI on MeeGo-on-Atom-Netbooks?

  • by simula (1032230) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @05:33PM (#32022156) Homepage
    As a Qt developer and an n900 owner, Nokia's efforts to extend the Qt platform to portable devices is extremely exciting.

    Don't forget that Qt has been an inspiring cross-platform toolkit for years and is the framework behind KDE.

    Along with some great improvements to publish to phone support in Qt-Creator (Qt's LGPL IDE), we are getting expansions to the api which include: bearer management, contacts, location, messaging, multimedia, and sensors, among others.

    For more info:
    http://labs.trolltech.com/blogs/2010/04/27/nokia-qt-sdk-what-is-in-and-what-is-not-and%E2%80%A6-what-is-it/ [trolltech.com]
    http://qt.nokia.com/products/appdev/add-on-products/catalog/4/new-qt-apis/mobility [nokia.com]
    • I know it won't be that practical for an handheld device but someone should really port KDE 4 to Meego/N900 along with the compile instructions and we will really understand if people are being truly ignorant or maliciously ignorant about whatever Nokia does.

      Obviously Nokia has such manpower and KDE devs are busy. If I were them, I would release a full meego/KDE4/Flash 10/desktop java/j2me install package for N900 to show what a "tablet" should be and what kind of power Qt represents in this age.

      • Re:KDE 4 needed (Score:5, Informative)

        by stilborne (85590) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:36PM (#32023130) Homepage

        We're already working on it: http://www.notmart.org/index.php/Software/KDE_on_MeeGo

        We had been working previously with both Maemo and Moblin, so this in a way simplifies things a bit for us. It's early days yet, but we're making great progress. The more the merrier, so feel free to join us (you can find us in #plasma on irc.freenode.net)

    • by godrik (1287354)

      I own a N810 (which is not a not, but more like a PDA). I must say I really like what nokia does.trying to get a standard for AC adapter is really nice. They have been really nice to the free/open source community, paying developpers for quite general things. And I find their hardware quite robust.

      PS: I am not paid by nokia, I just like their business model!

    • by mxh83 (1607017)

      Isn't the N900 screwed now what future phones will use 'Maemo'? I think Nokia has abandoned it

      • by mxh83 (1607017)

        Isn't the N900 screwed now *that future phones will use 'Maemo'? I think Nokia has abandoned it

      • by simula (1032230)
        If you look at the first link I pasted, you will see that this Qt release directly supports the n900 with a bunch of portable device specific new features.

        In fact, once 4.7 is released within the next couple months, you will be able to publish directly to the n900, interact with your app, and trigger break points in Qt-Creator on your PC.

        As a Qt developer I have been pleasantly surprised by Nokia's commitment to expanding my ability to develop software for my n900 :)
        • by ultrabot (200914)

          In fact, once 4.7 is released within the next couple months, you will be able to publish directly to the n900, interact with your app, and trigger break points in Qt-Creator on your PC.

          What you want is PR1.2, not Qt 4.7. PR1.2 will happen earlier.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Nursie (632944)

        N900 uses Maemo. I think you mean Meego, the Moblin/Maemo meld.

        N900 seems to be at least the test platform for this, so it's highly likely us N900 owners will be able to transition.

        I don't know what you mean by "screwed" either. M5 will continue to be supported and, hell, I'll probably get another phone in a year anyway so I'm looking forward to the next Meego device.

  • I for one, welcome our Finnish open source overlords.

    Christ Qt is awesome. I've only played with it a bit, but the cross-platform effortlessness is more than I could have asked for.

  • by scorp1us (235526) on Wednesday April 28, 2010 @06:24PM (#32022960) Journal

    The upcoming release will be Qt 4.7 + QtMobility 1.0.0 + QtCreator 2.0

    QtMobility [trolltech.com] is the API for accessing all the bits found on phones but sometimes on desktops. QtMobility has been released, just the other day. You can get it and run it against Qt 4.6
    -Messaging (mail/SMS)
    -Sensors
    -Multimedia
    -Services
    -Bearer Management (Network management when connected via Cell & WIFI)

    Qt 4.7 just went Beta status and should be expected soon.
    This release bring in QML, which has been called "Declarative UI". This is the sexy Flash competitor with CSS-style interfaces, animations, and JavaScripting. That's all it adds.

    Qt Creator 2.0 I believe is in Beta and will be released with Qt 4.7 as well.
    This is the (optional) IDE. But its really good in its own right for Qt development. It features ability to cross-compile and remote debug. You can compile and have it load the app onto your phone and debug that way. It also has QML viewer and WYSIWYG GUI development (Integrated QtDesigner)

  • The beta version of the SDK is available for download from today

    "From today"? Only today? I'm sure I won't be able to download it from yesterday, but what about tomorrow or three weeks from now?

    (Something's missing.)

    • by mangu (126918)

      I'm sure I won't be able to download it from yesterday, but what about tomorrow or three weeks from now?

      If I could download something from tomorrow right now I surely wouldn't want Qt. A list of winning lottery numbers would be much better, IMHO.

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