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VMware Promises Multiple OSs On One Cellphone 90

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the just-make-sure-i-can-strip-it-off-if-i-want dept.
superglaze writes to tell us that VMware has announced a large effort behind their Mobile Virtualization Platform, promising the possibility of multiple operating systems on mobile devices. "The company described MVP as a 'thin layer of software' that will be embedded in handsets and 'be optimized to run efficiently on low-power-consuming and memory-constrained mobile phones.' Asked whether MVP would offer something different from the abstraction already provided by mobile Java, VMware's European product director Fredrik Sjostedt told ZDNet UK that MVP would require less recoding. 'If you want to have an application run on a Java-specific appliance, you need to code it for Java,' Sjostedt said. 'What we're introducing with MVP is an [embedded] abstraction layer below that, between the physical hardware and the software layer.'"
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VMware Promises Multiple OSs On One Cellphone

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  • VMWare Promises Multiple OSs On One Cellphone

    Just the other day I was having problems getting World of Warcraft working in Windows Mobile on my Heier Black Pearl Micro [gizmodo.com] while at the same time using VMWare to host a wiki on a completely secure LAMP stack. Seriously guys, it's 2008--we've defeated our greatest fear (the polar bear) and we've elected an African American president--so why are cell phones still in the stone age? Is it really too much to ask for me to be able to play my favorite game and host some simple PHP pages while driving down the highway accepting incoming phone calls?

    • by nysus (162232) on Monday November 10, 2008 @01:36PM (#25707025)
      If you RTFA, it's not for end users but for vendors so they can easily roll out different platforms on different phones.
      • by HBI (604924)

        Sounds like a huge market.

        • Lost in the discussion was the sales target: 100 units total.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by HBI (604924)

            Wouldn't it be easier to just write an emulator for the smartphone CPU architecture to run on x86?

            • Then they'd have to be responsible for the OS, rather than just profiling or virtualizing it.

              • by HBI (604924)

                It would seem to me that most smartphone OS' would be hobbled by limited RAM were they to be virtualized on existing phone hardware.

                • Not with so many flash cards out there these days. Flash tends to obviate the problem of where to store, and screen real estate in terms of pixels is small.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by hockpatooie (312212)
          Yo dawg, I heard you like smartphones so I put a VM on your smartphone so you can smartphone while you smartphone.
      • by Bearhouse (1034238) on Monday November 10, 2008 @02:20PM (#25707811)

        Why they would want they do that? Increasingly, the handset suppliers are seeing the device software as being part of their value-add, brand differentiation and protection.

        They don't want M$, Google Android or FOSS. Think iPhone.

        Sounds like needless complexity on devices already challenged by small form factor, (memeory, battery lifre, CPU power...)

        The only thing that could temp me would be security - open email (and attachments) in a VM wihout risking crashing - or infecting - my phone, which I also might be using for GPS navigation - hmmmm..

        • by MightyYar (622222)

          the handset suppliers are seeing the device software as being part of their value-add,

          Maybe they are hoping that the carriers will want to spec phones that just run their own branded OS image? That would simplify carrier's spec process, so I can see the appeal for them. Instead of detailing every little menu item and feature, they could simply require that it be "VmWare Compatible".

          • See your point, but don't see how that gets round the problem of these devices being so tightly coupled, in terms of hw and os...would be a neat trick if you could ship stuff than ran under VM and was usable, despite the many different button placements, screen resolutions...

            For example, I have a Blackberry Pearl - some Java apps are run fine, but are unusable from the UI standpoint.

            • by MightyYar (622222)

              I agree that it seems unworkable - I was just speculating on their rationale.

              I suppose that it COULD work, but phones would have to get a lot more standardized. Alternatively, they could just specify a touch screen and then the keyboard becomes optional.

              Personally, I'd hate to see it because I think that the phone market is pretty "fun" with all of the innovation. Some things are just gimmicks, and others stick around. It'd be a shame to limit that market for the sake of standardization - it'd be similar to

              • Personally, I'd hate to see it because I think that the phone market is pretty "fun" with all of the innovation.

                With you on that one - although I wish they'd standardise on the charges and other cables - I have a drawful of chargers and headsets...

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by barzok (26681)

          Increasingly, the handset suppliers are seeing the device software as being part of their value-add, brand differentiation and protection.

          Outside the US, anyway.

          Inside the US, it matters not what the handset maker's software can do. Verizon cripples them all and puts their own shitware & UI on them.

        • by Pastis (145655)

          With something like Android, it takes little effort (e.g. a team of a few developers) to create support for a phone. See for example the time it takes to get android (basic support) on the FreeRunner.

          Now as an end user, if I get the opportunity to flash out my phone easily to get access to an open platform, I'll do it very quickly. I did this with a PC, I don't see why I couldn't do it with a phone.

          Split the carrier from the phone/os. Let the carrier be the ISP, and be done with that. The market is changing

      • And i at first was wondering if it was a pre-last act of desperation, given we recently read that a group (AMD?) showed that it now not only is possible for virtualization to hop between processors & families, but vendors, too. Then, i thought, "Damn! They're killing our Easy Bake Otis Spunkmeyer Mall operations... Shit, we have to start selling Chewy Gooey Betty Crocker Brownies, too for better product/platform diversification..."

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      Maybe some people like their cell phones to make phone calls without needing a reboot every few days, or being loaded up with a gigabyte of software in memory who's only purpose is to look in the mirror and say "Who's a pretty girl? I'm a pretty girl! Who's a pretty girl..."

    • by Locke2005 (849178)
      Hear, hear! Why waste time working on things like battery life, lack of memory, underpowered CPUs, and high cost, when obviously the single biggest roadblock to widespread adoption of new phones is the lack of ability to simultaneously run multiple Operating Systems!
      But seriously -- in what drug-addled delusional model of reality does this even begin to make sense? Customers don't want to pay for the extra memory, and Telcos don't want to pay the additional support costs. Overall, you would think the mar
    • by Gazzonyx (982402)
      Have you tried shifting some memory towards the LAMP stack, cranking down your VFS_cache_pressure, and booting WoW up under WINE/Crossover? Sure, your wikis performance will suffer, but if you take the URL down from your back window, maybe that'll keep the rest of us from pinging you while you game. Let me know if you get teamspeak working with bluetooth under WINE, I've been trying to get that to work forever!
    • Man you got modded funny, but I was sitting here thinking  how deep you are.

      True, I am high.  But still, I'm just sayin'
  • Why? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by internerdj (1319281) on Monday November 10, 2008 @01:31PM (#25706931)
    Fine. My cell has a crappy OS, but I don't think it will be better if I jam a second or third crappy OS onto it.
    • by LWATCDR (28044)

      I am betting this will be more like a HAL than a traditional virtual system.
      OS vendors will write to VMWare and then any phone that supports VMware will run the OS.
      No real porting effort required.
      Just another layer of abstraction.

  • Samsung? (Score:5, Informative)

    by TheRaven64 (641858) on Monday November 10, 2008 @01:36PM (#25707015) Journal

    I saw a demo by Samsung a while back of their ARM port of Xen running multiple operating systems on a mobile phone [xen.org]. Not sure what the status of the technology is now, but they had some pretty nice ideas with the driver model and were talking about live-migrating your VM from your phone to your TV when you got home.

    • by Toe, The (545098)

      Give the manufacturers another 75 years and we might even have a fully integrated lifestyle technology solution.

      Science fiction authors of the 70s and 80s never would have believed we'd be this slow getting there. We can't even have discussions with our houses about their appliances. Heck, most people can't even have the lights come on when they enter the room.

      Sure, there are more pressing problems in the world, but... wouldn't you think household/lifestyle integrations would be progressing faster than they

      • by jonbryce (703250)

        I think the reason they haven't progressed that much is that there isn't the demand for it.

        The light switch is still the simplest and most obvious UI for a light. You can get motion detectors for lights, only problem is that you have to wave your arms around every few minutes to switch the lights back on.

        We still use bi-metallic strips for our heating control systems, because they are simple, they work reliably and do the job just as well as a more complex system.

        As for the fridge ordering my shopping, how

  • "corporate phone personality", eh? So now my phone will be anal-retentive, calls will take 3-5 days before succeeding, and it'll come with this whiny voice asking me for the red stapler back? Will I have to ask permission to go to the bathroom too? This isn't what I signed up for when I became a geek. If I were the mother of these engineers, I'd force them to sing the entire set of all three High School Musical songs to them as punishment. And they would't be allowed to hangout with their friends in managem

  • Whoever tagged this "probleminsearchofasolution," can you explain that? The expression is "a solution in search of a problem" but maybe I am missing a turn of phrase relevant to this story.
  • Another one.... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Kaptain Kruton (854928) on Monday November 10, 2008 @01:44PM (#25707207)
    I suspect this is yet another project in which a company asked, "can we do it?" without asking, "should we do it?" I doubt much of a market exists for users that want to run more than one OS on a cell phone. Also, abstraction layer the company and article speak of sounds similar to the Java virtual machine, but on a slightly lower level. I am not very familiar with complex mobile devices, but can see very little benefit in creating another layer of abstraction at a lower level to simply allow quicker development of programs, when developers can already do that with Java if they want programs portable amongst devices.
    • Re:Another one.... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Comatose51 (687974) on Monday November 10, 2008 @02:08PM (#25707613) Homepage
      The idea behind a VM isn't simply to run multiple OSes. That's just one benefit. Imagine behind able to transfer the entire state of your machine between different physical hardware. VMware can already do this with x86 machines with VMotion. How they're looking for possible wider applications. How about being able to transfer everything on your old phone to a new phone? Or how about backing up everything on the phone somewhere? Or if you work in IT for a large company, wouldn't it be nice for your users if the loaner Blackberry can be customized and always stay the same for the user no matter which physical device is assigned? Don't forget how limited the Internet's applications were when it was first started. Innovation can happen when we apply old ideas to new areas.
      • by blincoln (592401)

        Imagine behind able to transfer the entire state of your machine between different physical hardware.

        So you're arguing for virtualizing the entire OS as a workaround for application vendors who can't be bothered to write configuration-migrating utilities? For a *cellphone*?

        I know I'm getting old, but isn't that a *bit* of overkill? And if the vendor can't be bothered to understand their configuration file/database well enough to migrate just those settings, do you really want to be running their software at

      • by jonbryce (703250)

        I bluetoothed my contact list across. Works fine. You don't need virtualisation to do that, just a standard format for information exchange, which already exists.

        My current phone backs up everything onto an exchange server. Blackberry server does the same thing.

    • Re:Another one.... (Score:4, Insightful)

      by BitZtream (692029) on Monday November 10, 2008 @03:34PM (#25709369)

      A lower level abastraction layer below the java VM ... you mean like the OS itself?

      All this VM stuff is becoming truely silly. Its really the OSes job to do all this crap, but since all the OS people can't get together in a sane manner, we have people making hardware virtualization to accomplish what the OS should be doing already.

      All we're going to do is end up with a VMWare OS(Or Xen, KVM, virtual iron, insert your favorite here, sorry I don't remember it), and another second level OS running on top of it. (*BSD, Linux, Solaris, Windows whatever).

      This whole thing is just silly and completely redundant, not just on mobile phones but on standard PCs and servers.

      We don't need a VM to get our jobs done, we need all the OS people to understand that we want common interfaces to code against, kinda like what POSIX sorta wanted to be but really wasn't.

      The OS is supposed to be our hardware abstraction layer, not a hypervisor that does hardware abstraction so our OS can do hardware abstraction so our apps can not no anything about the multiple levels of hardware abstraction.

      • by hab136 (30884)

        All this VM stuff is becoming truely silly. Its really the OSes job to do all this crap, but since all the OS people can't get together in a sane manner, we have people making hardware virtualization to accomplish what the OS should be doing already.

        Is it the operating system's job to migrate to a new physical machine if the one its running on catches on fire? Without stopping?
        Is it the operating system's job to consolidate multiple discrete machines with different purposes, users, and security on to the s

        • Simple: a smalltalk-esque userspace image that hops between kernels.
          • by hab136 (30884)

            Simple: a smalltalk-esque userspace image that hops between kernels.

            That's.. exactly what VMs are. Except instead of rewriting everything to Smalltalk or Java bytecode, it's left as x86 code.
            You can't exactly pause a Smalltalk image during the middle of a network operation, move it to a new kernel, and have it resume as if nothing happened (and within a half second).

            • Simple: a smalltalk-esque userspace image that hops between kernels.

              Take a good look at that and tell me what you see. BTW, i was implying that the kernel should be able to swap the in-RAM userland image in situ without making a hassle, I mean there is no good reason not to. Instead of crufting it up with things that are hardware independent and pointless to be there, like the file system, lets put something useful in there, for a change.

              • Damn it, replying to myself... Whatever. Um, did you say Java bytecode? You do realize that the concept of a easy to handle image of an application and its state are specific to the smalltalk VM environment?
                • by hab136 (30884)

                  Damn it, replying to myself... Whatever. Um, did you say Java bytecode? You do realize that the concept of a easy to handle image of an application and its state are specific to the smalltalk VM environment?

                  For different definitions of "easy", sure. You can serialize out Java apps with their state, but you have to write the serialization wrapper yourself instead of being built into the environment.

                  http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Programming/serialization/ [sun.com]

              • by hab136 (30884)

                Simple: a smalltalk-esque userspace image that hops between kernels.

                Take a good look at that and tell me what you see.

                Bold print? :)

                BTW, i was implying that the kernel should be able to swap the in-RAM userland image in situ without making a hassle, I mean there is no good reason not to.

                Ah, you want the kernel to remain hardware dependent but the entire userland to move around. Every API that userland can touch would have to be image-aware, in addition to the kernels on the machines sharing state (whether

        • by BitZtream (692029)

          I know the reply is late, but uhm, for almost all of your questions, YES it is the operating systems responsibility.

          Just because you haven't seen an operating system that actually works for shit doesn't mean its not there.

          And stop listening to all the advertising VMware is selling, when your VM server catches fire and suddenly stops, its not going to mysteriously appear on another VM server without stopping. The machine has to be moved to a new VM server. That move has to be triggered while the original s

          • by hab136 (30884)

            I know the reply is late, but uhm, for almost all of your questions, YES it is the operating systems responsibility.

            If every operating system has to implement these things.. uh.. we might be waiting a while. Old operating systems stay around for a long, long time - Microsoft just this year stopped selling Windows 3.1. OS/2 still exists in some places, as does DOS and SCO. XP and Windows Server 2000/2003 will be around a while too. While some operating systems now include some virtualization features, it

  • I am not yet running multiple OSes on my PC yet. I don't want them virtualized because (I figure) they'll run slower. I kinda feel that way about my phone too. Still they are looking ahead. It might help somebody/someday. So why not.

  • by neurocutie (677249) on Monday November 10, 2008 @01:53PM (#25707351)

    Aside from the obvious technical hurtles (underpowered CPUs, insufficient memory, insufficient flash ROM to store multiple OSs, few user-installable mobile OSs with device-specific "plug'n'play" support, etc), there would seem to be one glaring obstacle... the carriers.

    Lest anyone forget, the true customers for mobile devices are not individual consumers, but the carriers. And it is going to be a long time, if ever, before that will change. Indeed recent trends continue, if not increase, the extent of device-carrier lock-in, although often in more subtle ways that simply a software lock. The biggest trend is non-interoperable data services, either via authentication protocols that are carrier-specific, or simply spectrum differences (e.g. Tmobile's 3G bands are different than AT&T's or European 3G bands, even though all are considered "GSM").

    So given this, why exactly would a carrier be interested in provide its customers with the ability to run multiple OSs on their mobile devices. And it is far more complicated from a technical and licensing standpoint than on a generic PC. Mobile OSs are not licensed by individual customers, and they are totally not set up to be installed on arbitrary mobile hardware. For example, a Palm 700p and a 700w are almost the same hardware, but it is not possible and no one has even tried to put PalmOS from the 700p on a 700w, or vice versa, WinMo from the 700w to a 700p. The only notable efforts in this vein are attempts to port Android to HTC WinMo devices (with marginal but possible future success). However that is only possible because Android is open source. And there is not obvious benefit to the carrier for doing this...

    Indeed carriers, particularly Verizon (but all of them) generally try to restrict and remove features intrinsic to OEM devices (e.g. phone as modem features, WiFi, MMS, app suites like Pocket Office), in order to limit the individual customer's capabilities and force the carriers customers into specific "business models" for services (e.g. pay extra for phone as model, pay for data instead of free Wifi, etc). The freedom to run multiple OSs would necessarily give individual customers to circumvent these artificial, deliberate carrier-imposed restrictions -- something the carriers obviously would not want.

    All in all sounds like a huge amount of work required with little upside for the real customers, i.e. the carriers. Until the wireless networks are truly "open access", with the power of device choice in the hands of consumers, not the carriers, the effort of multiple OSs seems doomed to failure...

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Perhaps in the United States. In most of Europe all the phones are not subsidized by the carriers, are paid by the customers and are unlocked.

      Data, networks, frequencies. They are all standard and can be connected to with any phone on the market.

    • by FourthAge (1377519) on Monday November 10, 2008 @02:10PM (#25707647) Journal

      why exactly would a carrier be interested in provide its customers with the ability to run multiple OSs on their mobile devices. And it is far more complicated from a technical and licensing standpoint than on a generic PC.

      Maybe because it makes licensing simpler!

      Suppose you want your phone to run Linux, and you'd like the users to be able to install their own kernels and whatever other software they want, but you need to stop them messing with the GSM/3G stack in order to satisfy the FCC and the carrier. How do you do it? Answer: use virtualisation to split the software environment into two parts - "secure" and "open". Now your users get what they want (open software environment), and so do the carriers (some parts are still locked down).

      This is cheaper than the other way to solve the problem (using two separate computers). It also uses less energy. Even if a company doesn't care about Linux, they might still want to run complex consumer applications on their phones, requiring strong separation of privileges that are hard to assure in a large consumer OS kernel. x86 Windows XP on a phone? With a CPU like Intel Atom, hypervisor-level security and "PC on a chip" hardware, why not?

      There's enough reason to do this that all the mobile phone companies are involved with it in some way. Somebody mentioned a Xen version of this VMware system, and there's a port of L4 being made for this purpose as well [acm.org].

  • by CPE1704TKS (995414) on Monday November 10, 2008 @01:59PM (#25707469)

    It might be that you guys don't understand the benefits, but now that cell phones become part of the virtualization game, it really means that you can extend things almost anywhere. Think about what happened when the Internet moved out to cell phones, people are instantly connected to everything they want. They can communicate, etc from anywhere in the world.

    If you can virtualize your desktop onto your cell phone, think about the possibilities. You're working at your desk and then you need to go on a trip to a different country. You "download" your desktop onto your cell phone/iPhone or whatever, and then you can keep working, and even maintain network connectivity. By the time this becomes mainstream, I'm sure cell phones will have multi-GHz equivalent chips with 20+ gb storage. Then, when you get to the hotel, you connect up your cell phone to the hotel's docking system with monitor and keyboard, etc.

    You keep working, and then when you get back to the office, just transfer your virtual machine back onto your desktop. Or, if you want, just keep working from your cell phone.

    Who knows what the possibilities will be, but this seems to be the point. Processors aren't getting much faster, guys, and the applications that need them have pretty much ended. I'm still using my 1 GHz laptop from 2004 without skipping a beat, and I don't imagine things needing much more than this for the next 5 years. I'm sure within a few years the cell phones will be more powerful than this.

    • by blincoln (592401) on Monday November 10, 2008 @02:26PM (#25707939) Homepage Journal

      You are using "virtualize" in the marketing sense. There is no good reason to virtualize the entire OS of a desktop machine just so that you can copy your documents and preferences to a cellphone and back. That's not using a sledgehammer instead of a flyswatter. It's building a fleet of space-tugs, sending them to the asteroid belt to bring back asteroids, and then dropping those asteroids from orbit onto the flies.

      • by CPE1704TKS (995414) on Monday November 10, 2008 @02:43PM (#25708339)

        No, you get it, you're being far too small-minded about this. You have this single concept of what virtualization should be, and you're wrong because you can't see what it could bring in the future.

        It's not about copying your documents back and forth. The entire interaction between you and your computer totally changes. Why exactly do I care where my desktop is running as long as I have access to it. Do I really want to copy my documents back and forth onto a single USB drive? Yeah, that's how we do it right now, but why even bother? Why not just have a single copy of my "desktop" and move it around from location to location. Who knows, maybe the cell phone will be the desktop in the future, and you just switch form factors depending on where you are or what you want to do. Virtualization is the first step to this, creating a homogeneous environment.

        Look at the difference between having your POP3 client vs having all your mail on Gmail. Would you consider that the same as dropping asteroids onto a fly? With a POP3 client, you need to copy around all your mail files whenever you want to move around, you need to know the specific server settings, etc. I know this because my mother-in-law came over last month and needed me to set up her POP3 client for her because it didn't work here. If she used Gmail, things would "just work". Same thing goes with virtualization, you can copy your documents around, but maybe the computer you're using doesn't have the same set up. Maybe the versions of MS Word are different, etc.

        Moving this concept out to cell phones is the next step, just like it was for email. I think it will take another 5 years, but I'm sure it's on its way. People will probably be docking their iPhones at work to download the desktop, working from home from their home docking station, etc.

        • by Compholio (770966)
          People tried this with networking, even on a fully gigabit network it's waaaay too slow to transfer everything to do with your "desktop" between instances of you logging in. For the foreseeable future there's no way to do what you talk about without having a physical medium where your files are directly stored and retrieved as needed (which is how many people use their flash drives now).
        • by Ant P. (974313)

          Why not just have a single copy of my "desktop" and move it around from location to location.

          Why carry around an entire fucking OS when a simple rsync or nfs mount over a vpn of /home/~ would suffice?

    • by blirp (147278)

      You keep working, and then when you get back to the office, just transfer your virtual machine back onto your desktop. Or, if you want, just keep working from your cell phone.

      But the strange thing is that the kind of work you can actually usefully do on these devices, really is all in your head. So time off from the computer, thinking, usually makes for a better product ...

      M.

    • by Teckla (630646)

      I would mod you up if I had mod points right now. What you describe is very similar to what I would like to do.

      There are 3 computers I use regularly, my work PC, my home PC, and my wife's PC. I would like to be able to switch between these interchangeably, with my entire "operating system" coming with me when I sit down at one of these PCs.

      Right now I can partially achieve what I want by running VirtualBox or VMware (or whatever) and copying the "virtual hard drive" to/from my USB flash drive. However, the

      • by jonbryce (703250)

        VMWare etc is not going to help you here.

        I use a combination of RSync, Exchange, Remote Desktop and Samba to achieve what you are looking for.

        It so happens that my Windows 2003 server runs on VMWare, but that is so I have less boxes under my desk. Not so I can move things around.

    • If you can virtualize your desktop onto your cell phone, think about the possibilities. You're working at your desk and then you need to go on a trip to a different country. You "download" your desktop onto your cell phone/iPhone or whatever, and then you can keep working, and even maintain network connectivity.

      Or I just pick up my laptop and put it in the bag. Now I have something with a trackpoint and a keyboard best operated by more than one finger. Oh, and it can also compile stuff reasonably fast, it can switch between applications and I can see more than four lines of code on the screen.

      True, it doesn't last several days on a single battery charge. And it doesn't fit in my pocket. On the other hand, I don't run emacs and compiz on my phone these days; and the places where I only have the computer I can s

      • by jonbryce (703250)

        You could have your phone and your laptop both talking to an Exchange server, or some similar groupware server from a competitor. I don't see where virtulisation comes into it.

  • The first thing that came to my mind when I read this was extended battery life. With my old phone, which was only a phone, the battery lasted for days and days. My Tilt won't make it 24 hours unless I never actually use it and I have good signal quality the whole time.
    Maybe, through virtualization, my phone could be "just a phone" until I need the rest of the stuff. If you run "phone" as one VM and "mobile computer" as another VM and only start it up when you actually need the mobile computer stuff. That's

  • by ErMaC (131019) <ermac.ermacstudios@org> on Monday November 10, 2008 @02:40PM (#25708279) Homepage

    For those of you thinking that this is a solution in search of a problem, let me outline where VMware is going with this.
    At VMworld this year, Paul Maritz (VMware CEO) outlined their strategy for the future of the desktop - a world where users are given access to applications and data regardless of the end device. Today we see desktops as more device-centric, rather than people centric. VDI (Virtual Desktop Infrastructure) is a step in the direction of device-independence. It doesn't matter if I'm at work, at home, or on the road, I can get to the same desktop, applications, and data.
    But going forward VMware is looking at delivering the entire desktop steamed down as a VM to a "client hypervisor", so instead of viewing as it runs remotely in a datacenter, the data is streamed down and processed locally so there's no lag induced by a high-latency link or something like that.
    This works great for ordinary PCs or x86-based thin clients. Where VMware is going is taking their hypervisor layer and moving it to the mobile device, so that a user can get their same desktop (or a subset of its functionality) even from their PDA/smartphone. That's the purpose of this technology long term - it's not so you can run Android in a VM on your iPhone.

  • I just got a Sprint Touch Pro, and I am having problems deciding on what WM6.1 OS variant to run. I'd LIKE to have

    1. The original HTC/Sprint Rom - backup mostly
    2. A optimized / striped down version of WM6.1 without all the Sprint crapware (Sprint TV and music, and misc memory and cpu wasting Sprint branding)
    3. Google Android

    There IS plenty of memory for all three. 45 min to reflash is a PITA, and I loose all my settings each time I do. A simple reboot and chose my OS at boot time is much preferred. My perso

  • Which one will the root shell be running in when I type reboot?

  • What's the point?

    You already have (in most smartphones) an operating system for the radio and one for the system the user sees.

    I mean, is it necessary to run Android and Windows Mobile at the same time, or at all, on the same phone?

    People might argue DEVELOPERS, DEVELOPERS, DEVELOPERS, but I argue right back, isn't it more intelligent to design software FOR AND ON the device your designing it for? I mean, I'm all for productivity, but it seems like you end up with better software beta testing it on the act

  • by pesho (843750)
    ... do they promise additional cell phone batteries and a pocket air conditioning system to go along with it.
  • It already exist: http://www.linuxdevices.com/news/NS8417344656.html [linuxdevices.com]. However, their solution runs a custom RTOS for modem control and a Linux kernel for the multimedia and MMI.
  • by nurb432 (527695)

    Except for developers what practical value will this be?

  • I don't need faked hardware, I just want the real specs to port Haiku to them! After all the marketing buzz about "mobile desktop", that means those are the same as PCs, for which at least here tied sale is illegal. But of course providing alternative OSes means specs are needed...
  • At least two companies have been focusing on OS virtualization on mobile phones for several years, namely Virtuallogix and Trango. They both advertize the interest of running both an RTOS specialized on real-time mobile network protocol handling, and a generic-purpose OS for user applications. Security is also a motivation, especially if phone-based payment systems develop. I believe there are already models running Virtuallogix software on sale now, just check their web site. So VmWare is just saying that

Never trust a computer you can't repair yourself.

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