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Google's Android Cellphone SDK Released 283

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the can-you-hear-me-now dept.
AchiIIe writes "The android SDK has been released to the wild. As expected it features the Linux Kernel, low level libraries such as FreeType, OpenGL, SQL Lite, WebKit (as a web browser), a custom Java Bytecode interpreter that is highly specialized for the CPU. A common java API is provided. A video has been posted with an the overview of the API." SM: Several readers have also written to mention the Android Developer Challenge offering $10 million in prizes for cool mobile apps.
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Google's Android Cellphone SDK Released

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  • Hardware? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Andy Dodd (701) <atd7@cCOWornell.edu minus herbivore> on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:25PM (#21325889) Homepage
    What hardware platform does it run on?

    "a custom Java Bytecode interpreter that is highly specialized for the CPU" - Kind of hard to do that in an emulator on a PC. What CPU is this optimized for? (Guessing ARM... Still, to evaluate performance you need real hardware.)
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by aneviltrend (1153431)
      True, measuring actual current draw and temperature statistics will always require the physical hardware in question. But modern hardware simulators are able to accurately model such parameters (as well as architecture-dependent events such as cache misses) and give a good feel for the performance (both in terms of power consumption and software speed). And I'm sure an architecture as popular as ARM has several simulators for that exact purpose.
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by angryLNX (679691)
      What would be needed would be a developer's model for these phones,
      and the correct transfer hardware and developer's kit from a NON-OHA
      phone.

      Ironically, that makes this really hard, because the old-school (non-
      Android) handsets make it very hard to independently develop with.

      We have a forum thread discussing this possibility:
      http://www.ohadev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=23 [ohadev.com]

      Cheers,
      Brian Jordan
      http://ohadev.com/ [ohadev.com] - Android SDK discussion, code samples, tutorials,
      application submission
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by radimvice (762083)

      "a custom Java Bytecode interpreter that is highly specialized for the CPU" - Kind of hard to do that in an emulator on a PC. What CPU is this optimized for? (Guessing ARM... Still, to evaluate performance you need real hardware.)

      The "custom Java Bytecode interpreter" probably means a Jazelle JVM [arm.com] or variant. These are specialized CPU/JVM combinations that execute Java bytecode in hardware. This technology is used on many of the Java phones already in the market.

      -Will [ohadev.com]

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by ClassMyAss (976281)
        Having done a quick pass through the docs, it doesn't look like there's much info on the VM, other than that they're calling it the "Dalvik VM" (a Google search doesn't turn up much - Dalvik is just some place in Iceland, so it's likely they just chose the name).

        I kind of doubt the Jazelle thing, though, since Warren East at ARM was talking smack about Android [wired.com], and they are the ones that do Jazelle...
  • by angryLNX (679691) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:28PM (#21325917) Homepage
    The most common question I've heard is "What hardware is the Android platform running on?" Nobody outside of Google and possibly the Open Handset Alliance members has run it on hardware yet. If you're interested in trying to hack it, there is a board of people trying to get it on some phones: http://www.ohadev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=15 [ohadev.com] ------------ Cheers, Brian Jordan http://ohadev.com/ [ohadev.com] - Android SDK code samples, tutorials, discussion
  • a COOL app (Score:4, Funny)

    by cadience (770683) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:33PM (#21325995)
    a TODO list!! ;-)
  • by radimvice (762083) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:36PM (#21326045) Homepage
    Shouldn't this point to the official repository at http://code.google.com/android/ [google.com] instead of http://code.google.com/p/android [google.com], which just looks like some ad-hoc mirror?
  • That's a large enough amount that even I might dust off my old Java skiilz..
    • by paranode (671698)
      Well, you get $25k for being in the top 50. Then that gets subdivided after later development into two groups of ten, one group getting $100k and the better group getting $275k.
    • Clearly I've been using Bittorrent to watch too much tv; I first read that subject as Season 1, Episode 7. :)
    • Sorry to nitpick, but shouldn't that be $10e6, or $1e7?
      Hell, just use <Dr Evil>10 Million Dollars! Muahahaha</Dr Evil>

      -metric
  • by Carl Rosenberger (449479) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:43PM (#21326145) Homepage
    Android is fully based on Java.

    Being a developer of an open source java database [db4o.com] myself, I am absolutely thrilled.

    This is the the single best possibe thing that could have happened for the success of Java on devices. This SDK will be decisive for how software will be written for the masses in the future: With Java. Don't forget: The number of mobile phone users without a PC will soon be an order of magnitude higher than the number of PC users.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      This is the the single best possibe thing that could have happened for the success of Java on devices. This SDK will be decisive for how software will be written for the masses in the future: With Java.
      Mobile Java *did* have a success. People realized it and it's now ubiquitous.

      Don't forget: The number of mobile phone users without a PC will soon be an order of magnitude higher than the number of PC users.
      That also has already happened.
  • by radimvice (762083) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:44PM (#21326151) Homepage
    Some friends and I have started a discussion forum for independent developers at ohadev.com [ohadev.com], please stop by and leave some comments if you're interested in getting in touch with some independent Android enthusiasts.
  • by trolltalk.com (1108067) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:45PM (#21326171) Homepage Journal

    "The Android Developer Challenge is open to individuals, teams of individuals, and business entities. While we seek to make the Challenge open worldwide, we cannot open the Challenge to residents of Cuba, Iran, Syria, North Korea, Sudan, and Myanmar (Burma) because of U.S. laws. In addition, the Challenge is not open to residents of Italy or Quebec because of local restrictions."

    Mama Mia! Tabernak!

  • Rather create just cell phones, how about creating a regular house phone that uses VOIP (not a big deal), but have the base be able to talk to the local network (not just in VOIP mode).

    Now, your phone is your true home assisitant.

    • Want to see the tv guide? Look it up on the house phone.
    • Want to control lights on the X-10 network ? Use the home phone.
    • Likewise, you want to look in on baby? Buy the extra network baby camera and then use the phone to listen or view.
    • Want to jot down a note, then do it on t
    • by alienw (585907)
      Now the remaining question: who wants this and why?
      • Well, we have a baby camera here with a portible monitor. Great thing going. In addition, I have recently put all the video/audeo in a cabinet and I use an IR extender to control them. I have several house lights on X10, as well as several outdoor outlets (holiday lighting), and then use this for xmas lighting indoors. We have comcast, but only 1 tv has digital. The others are analog. No guide there. Have to go to the computer to get it. All sorts of uses for this. Heck, average ppl are spending 200 for si
    • by DdJ (10790)
      Isn't Android open source?

      Isn't the iPhone SDK coming due out right around February? And doesn't that support the iPod Touch as well as the iPhone?

      Seems to me that you could combine what Google and Apple are doing in the handset space right now to achieve pretty much what you want...

      (By the way, I've already been doing some of the specific things you're talking about with web apps designed to render on phones. There's a Java API (other languages too) for X10, and so you can write web apps tuned for handhe
    • by Aladrin (926209)
      So you'd rather see them jury-rig a home phone to do complicated things than have them create an interface on a mobile platform (PDA, phone, etc) that could do it much easier and visually, instead of having the user constantly listen to prompts and/or memorize button presses?

      No thanks. I'd much rather see the same hooked up to a phone with a decent-sized screen (the iPhone comes to mind, even though I don't own one) and be able to control it like that. Maybe the Neo1973 ... Since OpenMoko is open source,
      • So you'd rather see them jury-rig a home phone to do complicated things than have them create an interface on a mobile platform (PDA, phone, etc) that could do it much easier and visually, instead of having the user constantly listen to prompts and/or memorize button presses?

        Apparently, you have not looked over android yet. Short answer, they are targeting touch screens as well as old style. I would assume that most of the phones that will come from this will be iphone style. Me? I would rather see an ipho

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by senor_burt (515819)
      I'm doing most of this already, using a mashup of Asterisk (open source), Voxeo Prophecy (2-4 ports free CCXML/VXML ASR/TTS in English), Linksys web-cams, and the Insteon developer kit. It works with wireless PDAs which have SIP clients running on them, too. The cost was just in hardware.
    • This was part of the idea behind the UMPC. People didn't really buy it. I could see some sort of a universal home remote control being worthwhile, but only if my computers and appliances and stereo/TV all operated with some open standard that was easy to set up.

    • Oh, you mean LinuxMCE [linuxmce] with Cisco 7970 phones.

      To complete your dream, make the LMCE Orbiter run on an Android mobile phone.
  • worth a try.. (Score:5, Informative)

    by abes (82351) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:51PM (#21326259) Homepage
    I just downloaded the SDK, so will hopefully have some time to play around with it. It looks potentially very interesting, but here are a few quick thoughts:

    (1) It's Java. Sometimes Java is the right tool for the job. Unfortunately, I've never been a big fan of the Java libraries. They always seemed overly complex and verbose to do simple things. I say this comparing it to both the STL/Boost for C++ and Cocoa. Granted, both of those libraries have their issues.

    (2) It's eclipse-centric. It looks like they want you to use Eclipse. I'm sure you can do fine without using Eclipse. I'm not sure how dependent it is on creating interfaces etc. So you might do best to ignore this point. Eclipse does some things really well -- taking advantage of being a Java-based editor, it can use RTTI to help in the code-writing process.

    That said, I would be very happy if I never had to use Eclipse again. The interface itself is extremely non-intuitive, gets in the way, and caused a great deal of swearing to occur. Nowadays I use either Emacs, Textmate, or XCode. XCode isn't perfect but it does a really good job of not getting in your way, and occasionally actually helping out (like the reference panel that automatically calls up info on the function your cursor is over .. it's on the side so it doesn't get in the way, but it's there if you want it).

    (3) Code layout. I'm not sure how much of it being a Java thing, or how much it is google, but the fact that I need to go 3-4 directories in just to get to the source code is very frustrating. I'm pretty sure there's better ways to do that.

    (4) I have an iPhone. I'm waiting for the iPhone SDK to be released .. it will be interesting to see how it compares. I really like Cocoa. It's really a great language/libraries for developing windowed systems. Interface Builder is the only GUI builder I think makes sense. I hate code generation, and I hate the weird quirks that come with many others (QT, Visual Studios, WxWidgets, GLADE++). IB just works.

    (5) It appears to come with an emulator, which is very cool! That is a major win for fast development times.

    Give all my complaints, I'm probably going to try writing an app or two for it ASAP. Code should be fun to write, which will be my major test for how good/bad the platform is. I also wonder how configurable it is. Did they come up with good conventions? If not, can you override them, or will all apps suffer the same?
    • Re:worth a try.. (Score:5, Insightful)

      by radimvice (762083) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:05PM (#21326453) Homepage

      Some responses to your points:

      (1) It's Java.

      Java is the entrenched standard for mobile development. Google isn't pushing Java here, they're trying to maximize their reach to existing mobile developers.

      (2) It's eclipse-centric.

      As mentioned on their site, Google's developers use a mix of Eclipse, IntelliJ, and NetBeans for development, which is pretty much the standard in Java development. They've probably released an Eclipse plugin first because it had the broadest reach and perhaps it was the easiest environment to create a plugin for. I doubt this means that Google is pushing Eclipse, however, I would expect tutorials and documentation (if not additional plugins) to be released for the other environments soon enough.

      (3) Code layout.

      Code layout in package directories is pretty much a Java thing, again pretty standard.

      (4) I have an iPhone.

      iPhone is a single phone. Android will support a whole platform of upcoming phones. This is a big enough difference to be interested in the Android SDK at the very least, if not both. Plus, you can check out the Android SDK now while you'll have to wait until February for teh iPhone SDK.

      (5) It appears to come with an emulator, which is very cool!

      Yeah, it is very cool! This is also pretty standard for wireless toolkits (WTK), since development on the devices themselves is usually difficult and time-consuming. My company's [javaground.com] suite of game development tools includes a similar universal emulator, which I love using. It's pretty much a must for mobile development.

      I'm also looking very forward to playing around with the SDK. Hope some great things can come from these developments in the mobile world.

      -Will [ohadev.com]

      • by abes (82351)
        (1) Yes, Java is a standard. Yes, it's part of Google's repertoire. But it doesn't mean it's the best selection (nor does it mean it's a bad one). I would point out that currently most mobile platforms aren't very good. Does this reflect on Java, the companies, or the market?

        Flash is also a widely used platform, but I really wouldn't ever endorse it for anything besides making banner ads involving monkeys getting punched.

        (2) Since they are going with Java, it does make sense to go with those technologies. I
    • by eric2hill (33085)

      (4) I have an iPhone. I'm waiting for the iPhone SDK to be released .. it will be interesting to see how it compares. I really like Cocoa. It's really a great language/libraries for developing windowed systems. Interface Builder is the only GUI builder I think makes sense. I hate code generation, and I hate the weird quirks that come with many others (QT, Visual Studios, WxWidgets, GLADE++). IB just works.

      I've had a much better GUI design experience after switching to JFormDesigner [jformdesigner.com]. It does a spectacular job of making all the layout managers completely intuitive. The only other GUI designer that even came close to it was the Delphi/C++Builder designer, but it was still a distant second place.

      It's paid for itself many times over in saved headaches and time.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by edxwelch (600979)
      (1) It doesn't come with java libraries, they have written their own framework. It pretty big though... I count 2000 classes.

      (2) You need a bit of patience to learn eclipse. Don't try to learn it without reading the tutorial. Once you get over the learning curve you probaly will like it.

      (3) Yeah, that annoys me too, but only minor annoyance.

  • ZOMG! (Score:3, Funny)

    by 0xdeadbeef (28836) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:52PM (#21326267) Homepage Journal
    It's a Cylon!

    I demand that henceforth we all refer to the runtime as the Dalek VM.
  • by bogaboga (793279) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:54PM (#21326297)
    Can someone tell me how Google will make money off this open source platform? Individual phone companies will create their own apps and port them to the phones. How will Google cash in? May be via ads but suppose the phone companies refuse.
    • by nine-times (778537) <nine.times@gmail.com> on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:19PM (#21326631) Homepage

      It might be worth it for them just by making it hook in easily with Google ads and search.

      Think about it this way: as mobile phones become more powerful and internet-ready, more people will be doing more of their casual online stuff on their phones. Right now, lots of smartphones are defaulting to Windows for their development. That means their web browsers will probably use Live search for their search engine. Phones will recommend Hotmail for anyone looking for webmail. It will become a good way for Microsoft to fight Google for online dominance.

      So what's Google's way to fight back? Apple's keeping the iPhone software to themselves. Palm is basically a joke. RIM's stuff is pretty limited. Google has to build their own platform so that Nokia and Motorola will be using Google Search, Gmail, Google Apps, Blogger, etc. as a default.

      So that's where the money is. That's where all Google's money comes from.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Lord Ender (156273)
        It's more than that. Google makes money by gathering information about you based on your searches and email contents, then sending that info to advertisers. A Google phone could do both of those things, but could ALSO target ads to you based on your GPS coordinates!

        For example, if your search history included something like "taco bell nutrition information," and you were walking past a Taco Bell, I'm sure Pepsi Co would gladly pay Google some cash to have your phone pop up the message "try our new Grande C
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      I don't think they plan to make money from this, it just looks a way to avoid Microsoft doing in cellphones what it did in desktops.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by hypnagogue (700024)
      Just a hint from the API: Google Maps is integrated into the framework. Thus, location-based services developed on this platform will use Google. This is no small thing -- look at the Google Maps mashups of the last several years.

      As a user of Google Maps on Windows Mobile, I can tell you that the only thing broken about it is Windows Mobile. Amazing operating system, assuming you adopt the "why the heck did it just do that?" definition of "amazing". (e.g. wakes from hibernation to display the "low batt
    • by bigjocker (113512) *
      It's really simple. They own the 'Android' name. If you are a handset manufacturer and want to jump in the Android bandwagon, you will have to pay google (more likely you will have to pay for each phone delivered with the Android label (and google label, they'll want to put that too)).

      Owning the platform (it's free, so you have a license to do almost anything, but impersonate google as the creator) gives them a lot of power. 10MM USD is pocket change compared with the publicity and the amount of great appli
  • WebKit? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by DdJ (10790) on Monday November 12, 2007 @01:59PM (#21326377) Homepage Journal
    Holy crap, they bundled WebKit? I somehow missed that in all the hoopla.

    That means that the gPhone web browser has the same rendering engine as the iPhone web browser, the one that's shared by Safari (and OmniWeb) on the desktop. It's going to get less and less safe for web developers to ignore that rendering engine...
    • Re:WebKit? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ianare (1132971) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:34PM (#21326837)

      It's going to get less and less safe for web developers to ignore the standards and only code for IE...
      There, fixed.
    • Yeah, I'm surprised there hasn't been a bigger deal made out of that. It's not too surprising, since Apple and Google have been partnering up quite a lot lately. However, Google is also the big sponsor for Firefox. I guess Firefox wasn't mobile-ready yet.
    • by m2943 (1140797)
      The vast majority of smart phones in the world run WebKit... because it's Nokia's standard browser, and has been for several years.
    • Re:WebKit? (Score:5, Informative)

      by makapuf (412290) * on Monday November 12, 2007 @06:12PM (#21329711)

      the one that's shared by Safari (and OmniWeb) on the desktop
      And Konqueror, damnit! IIRC, They wrote this code in the first place, please credit them at least here !
  • by SmallFurryCreature (593017) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:01PM (#21326405) Journal

    You know who you are, the ones that said Ballmer had a point last week when he called Android a press-release. Well, here is the SDK, as promised. On time.

    So will all those slashdotter who doubted eat crow now? Or will the MS fanboys just pretend this never happened, or now move on to, "all google has is a press-release, and a sdk, and an alliance".

    Come on, we need some amusement here. Spin this one!

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by legirons (809082)
      "So, were all the nay-sayers now?You know who you are, the ones that said Ballmer had a point last week when he called Android a press-release. Well, here is the SDK, as promised. On time."

      OpenMoko mailing lists have average 50 posts per day (and has been that way for months). They've released real hardware. There are hundreds of youtube videos demonstrating OpenMoko interface, and hundreds of people hacking on the phone. It's the only phone where hackers are tolerated, let alone welcomed.

      And the biggest t
  • So does an ad pop up every time I make an OpenGL call? Every X calls? Every 5 minutes? 30 minute video before I can make a phone call?

    Lets not pretend Google isn't an ad company. If it doesn't push ads, they wouldn't do it. We already know from their announcements they will use voice recognition to figure out what ads to push.

    Sorry Google, but F' you and your little ads too.
  • by 605dave (722736) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:05PM (#21326439) Homepage
    To me the most interesting aspect of the announcement was the inclusion of WebKit as the HTML rendering solution. This is a huge boon for the WebKit project, and should make many of the new iPhone web apps compatible with the new system. I'm not an expert on this, but isn't any one else surprised by the decision? Isn't Google traditionally associated with the Mozilla engine? By going with the WebKit, developers now have a target browser for Windows, Mac, the iPhone, Nokia, and now gPhone. (and there seem to be several linux projects building on it). Not to mention that the KDE group is now working to merge back in with WebKit. Sounds like a pretty strong platform for me. And an open standard that will benefit a great deal from the powerful groups working with it.
  • by DdJ (10790) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:05PM (#21326461) Homepage Journal
    You know, it may not take a whole lot of work to get an Android runtime up and running on the iPhone once they open up the iPhone SDK. I read through the Android dev docs, and apps are written in Java. You don't directly call native code, you just have a JVM with libraries available to it. So it may not be all that hard to get a compatible runtime into a much wider variety of devices.

    That would mean that you could code for the gPhone and deploy on the iPhone (or even iPod Touch), either by loading the runtime onto the iPhone first (cf. "Cedega"), or by bundling a stripped-down runtime into the iPhone version of the app (cf. "Cider").

    That'd rock. That'd rock hard. I'd become an Android developer if things work out that way.
  • by sribe (304414) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:08PM (#21326501)

    The android SDK has been released...

    No it hasn't. THAT'S IMPOSSIBLE! IT'S JUST VAPORWARE! IT'S JUST A PLAN ON PAPER! THERE'S NOTHING BEHIND IT, NO SPECS, NO DETAILS!

    I'm 100% sure this is the case because Steve Ballmer said so. All claims to the contrary must therefore be lies.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Creepy (93888)
      Not to be the rationalist when you're clearly poking fun of Mr Nervous (Ballmer), but at the time he said that (in a press conference last Thursday in Tokyo) he was right - there really wasn't much info out there, and a lot of the speculation was wrong. Today was the first release of any hard info and SDK, but they still haven't released any performance numbers and it still doesn't run on any existing handset (at least publicly).

      Google does have a strong corporate backing, however, including companies that
    • No it hasn't. THAT'S IMPOSSIBLE! IT'S JUST VAPORWARE

      if you can buy or otherwise get a phone running Android, and the phone can make calls, then it's not vapour. Do we have that?
  • FreeType, OpenGL, SQL Lite
    No SDL?
    • FreeType, OpenGL, SQL Lite
      No SDL?
      They must have at least SDL because they showed off Quake running on it. The most popular port of Quake on Linux uses SDL. I'm sure they left out many other libs that it comes with too.

      -metric
      • Now that I think about it, that was completely irrational. It's not like Android comes with Quake.. If they got Quake on it, then they can get SDL on it... or statically link SDL with Quake.

        -metric
  • SQL Lite ? (Score:4, Informative)

    by BuR4N (512430) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:20PM (#21326645) Homepage Journal
    I belive that should be SQLite (www.SQLite.org)
  • The movies got it wrong - SkyNet started with the mobile phones. They used radio mind-links to control two-legged slaves. The GooglePlex became sentient years ago and has patiently building its drone army.
  • by TheNarrator (200498) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:30PM (#21326797)
    http://code.google.com/android/ [google.com]

    Check out the video of Sergei! He's the CEO of the company, worth billions of dollars, making an official product promotional video and he's wearing a shirt that looks like he slept in it! If you can be a billionaire wearing shirts that you slept in I don't even know why I even bother wearing a collar at all :).
    • If you can be a billionaire wearing shirts that you slept in I don't even know why I even bother wearing a collar at all :).

      Other way 'round. Sergey can wear whatever shirt he wants because he is a billionaire (also note his hair looks as if it has just been slept in as well in that video). You, on the other hand, not being a billionaire, must wear the shirt that The Man tells you to wear.

      -jimbo

  • Android is a software stack for mobile devices that includes an operating system, middleware and key applications. This early look at the Android SDK provides the tools and APIs necessary to begin developing applications on the Android platform using the Java programming language. where is the C/C++ SDK? i have not had a chance to look at the SDK, but i assume you should be able to JNI (java native interface)? i was looking forward to android, but unfortunately, if it only has a Java SDK, it does not suit
  • First Post? (Score:4, Funny)

    by dfj225 (587560) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:45PM (#21326993) Homepage Journal
    First post from the Android emulator? Its slow as balls, btw...
  • Dollars? (Score:4, Funny)

    by nicklott (533496) on Monday November 12, 2007 @02:53PM (#21327109)

    $10 million in prizes
    I hope that's Canadian dollars, US might not cover your ADSL charges...
  • Over a year ago, some hackers figured out how to run Linux on a Treo [shadowmite.com] smartphone. The Treo 7xx series for Windows Mobile looks even more hackable to Linux.

    Can anyone install Android as the Linux running one of these Treos? That makes all the devices work, including touchscreen and (cell) radio?
  • Sounds like they just took a bunch of concepts from Rubin's last company and put them on a Linux platform using more open-source libraries for the middleware (Freetype, SQL Lite, etc).

    Danger (aka Sidekick aka HipTop) is based on a custom Java VM as well, and allows developers to write apps for it using a Java SDK. What they don't have is Google's massive marketing machine...
  • by hey (83763)
    Looks like a reasonable OS for a desktop.
    Would be nice to be rid of X.

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