Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Verizon Communications Wireless Networking

Verizon To Disconnect Unlimited Data Customers Who Use Over 100GB/Month 422

Verizon Wireless customers who have an unlimited data plan and use significantly more than 100GB a month will soon be disconnected from the network unless they agree to move to limited data packages that require payment of overage fees. Ars Technica reports: Verizon stopped offering unlimited data to new smartphone customers a few years ago, but some customers have been able to hang on to the old plans instead of switching to ones with monthly data limits. Verizon has tried to convert the holdouts by raising the price $20 a month and occasionally throttling heavy users but stopped that practice after net neutrality rules took effect. Now Verizon is implementing a formal policy for disconnecting the heaviest users.In a statement, Verizon said: "Because our network is a shared resource and we need to ensure all customers have a great mobile experience with Verizon, we are notifying a very small group of customers on unlimited plans who use an extraordinary amount of data that they must move to one of the new Verizon Plans by August 31, 2016." a Verizon spokesperson told Ars. "These users are using data amounts well in excess of our largest plan size (100GB). While the Verizon Plan at 100GB is designed to be shared across multiple users, each line receiving notification to move to the new Verizon Plan is using well in excess of that on a single device." FYI: The 100GB plan costs $450 a month.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Verizon To Disconnect Unlimited Data Customers Who Use Over 100GB/Month

Comments Filter:
  • Glad (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:23PM (#52555367)

    to finally have found out the limit of unlimited!

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by TheoMurpse ( 729043 )

      I know you're just joking, but they are giving unlimited. Now they're saying "we aren't going to give you unlimited anymore and we aren't going to charge you anymore." This is a lot more reasonable and totally different from "we're calling it unlimited but not giving you unlimited," which is what the cable companies do.

      • Yes-- according to Verizon, "unlimited" has its limits.

        The point is, if you get cut off after reaching a limit... it really isn't unlimited, is it?

        I really do hope somebody hits them hard for false advertising [cornell.edu]

        • by qeveren ( 318805 )

          They'll just claim that 'unlimited' doesn't mean what 'unlimited' means, it means something else.

        • I think that what they are doing is merely terminating the contracts of possibly unprofitable customers. These customers are on monthly contracts, which can be terminated by either party.

          Although, what if they have equipment purchases still being paid off? I guess Verizon is going to have to eat that cost.

  • So basically... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by dgatwood ( 11270 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:25PM (#52555391) Homepage Journal

    "Unlimited" to Verizon means "unlimited as long as you use less than 300 kilobits per second continuously". Which just happens to be almost exactly the minimum bandwidth for a Skype video call. Ponder that for a moment.

    • Re:So basically... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by ranton ( 36917 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:51PM (#52555633)

      The important term here is not "Unlimited", it is "Out of Contract". If you haven't signed a recent contract with Verizon and are just paying month to month on a grandfathered plan, they can cut your service at any time. Well, there may be regulations on how much notice they need to give, but apparently it isn't a long notice period.

      The only reason Verizon has kept these grandfathered users this long is because they were hoping regulations would allow them to throttle or otherwise limit usage. They were unsuccessful at that, so cancelling service is the natural alternative.

    • Re:So basically... (Score:4, Interesting)

      by kenh ( 9056 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @01:05PM (#52555757) Homepage Journal

      "Unlimited" to Verizon means "unlimited as long as you use less than 300 kilobits per second continuously". Which just happens to be almost exactly the minimum bandwidth for a Skype video call. Ponder that for a moment.

      Sure, I'll ponder that for a moment, then point out that you seem to think there are people that literally [merriam-webster.com] Skype 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 12 months every year, never stopping to eat, sleep, go to the bathroom, etc. I suspect many/most customers lead more balanced lives then that.

      • Skype doesn't somehow disconnect the call if it detects you walk away from the desk, dude. Also I'm sure there *have* been at least a few people who left their Skype on continuously for a week or something, reality show-style.

        Why are we even arguing about this? The GP's point was that the rate was ridiculously low, not that the example itself was a dumb use case.

      • by Ranbot ( 2648297 )

        "Unlimited" to Verizon means "unlimited as long as you use less than 300 kilobits per second continuously". Which just happens to be almost exactly the minimum bandwidth for a Skype video call...

        Sure, I'll ponder that for a moment, then point out that you seem to think there are people that...Skype 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 12 months every year, never stopping to eat, sleep, go to the bathroom, etc. I suspect many/most customers lead more balanced lives then that.

        Just to play devil's advocate... some tech-savy people could use their grand-fathered unlimited data plans to monitor home or business surveillance cameras 24/7 via Skype or a similar streaming program. I could also imagine a heavy torrents user tethering a computer to a phone with an unlimited data plan and easily exceeding Verizon's 100GB/month cut-off.

    • Re:So basically... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Solandri ( 704621 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @01:18PM (#52555895)
      No. If you have an unlimited plan and use 100+ GB in a month, Verizon will give it to you that month as their contract terms say they will deliver unlimited data. It's just that next month Verizon will opt not to renew your month-to-month plan.

      People have got this really distorted view of how contracts work - where companies should not be allowed to screw you, but you're allowed to screw companies in perpetuity. When you signed up for the unlimited plan, Verizon agreed to it and you agreed to it for a x year contract (usually 2 years). When the contract was up, the plan continued as month-to-month. As the years passed, Verizon felt the plan was disadvantageous to them, but as a courtesy allowed you to keep it. They didn't have to, but in the interest of good customer relations they let you keep it. Now they've decided the drawbacks of that courtesy outweigh the benefits for them, and are adding a condition that if you use what they consider an excessive amount of data, they will not renew your outdated plan on a month-to-month basis.

      Think of if the situation were reversed. Say you got a cell phone in the early days when service was $100/mo for just voice, and calls were $1/min. After your 2 year contract was up, you should be allowed to change to a better plan if you want, right? Well so can the other party in the contract. Both sides have the right to terminate a month-to-month contract at the end of the month for any reason they see fit. If you want the security of knowing the other side will not terminate your contract at the end of the month, you need to sign a year or multi-year contract with them which locks in your contract terms for that period of time. But the other party is under no obligation to give you the same contract terms (same plan) they gave you 5 years ago.
    • by I4ko ( 695382 )
      Almost and exactly should never appear in the same sentence qualifying one another. Ever!
  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:25PM (#52555395)

    But I do not think it means what you think it means.

    What does unlimited mean? And why do you get penalized if you actually use it as such?

    • by ranton ( 36917 )

      But I do not think it means what you think it means.

      What does unlimited mean? And why do you get penalized if you actually use it as such?

      Verizon doesn't sign contracts guaranteeing unlimited data (they have in the past, but how is that relevant?). This is Verizon's final admission that they will no longer pretend they offer unlimited service. People complaining about these definitions should be happy about this. Verizon is finally being honest with their users and giving them a choice of contractual options Verizon is comfortable with.

    • by schnell ( 163007 )

      What does unlimited mean? And why do you get penalized if you actually use it as such?

      "Unlimited" means the exact same thing as "all you can eat." Which is to say that it is unlimited relative to a reasonably expected degree of consumption and within the bounds of what the provider considers to be the constraints of sharing a fixed amount of resources among multiple paying customers. If you go to the buffet and grab all the food before anyone else can eat it, and continue to do so until the restaurant's food is all gone, you can be pretty sure they are going to kick you out, regardless of ho

  • QL'EB? (Score:4, Funny)

    by Hognoxious ( 631665 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:29PM (#52555415) Homepage Journal

    The 100GB plan costs $450 a month.

    Combifoutuien? Baise le pape!

  • by fox171171 ( 1425329 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:29PM (#52555419)
    If they didn't want unlimited use, they should never have offered it. It has pretty much always been a lie from many of these companies, and they should be fined for it. Unlimited with an asterisk defining the limitations of unlimited is not acceptable.
    • by Richard_at_work ( 517087 ) <richardprice.gmail@com> on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:47PM (#52555571)

      They no longer offer it.

      And they also are under no obligation to allow out-of-contract users from continuing to use the old plan - which is exactly what they are doing here, telling the heaviest out-of-contract users to let up, move plan or Verizon will no longer do business with you.

      Just as you don't have to do business with Verizon, once you are out of contract Verizon no longer have to do business with you - you aren't guaranteed or entitled to the same plan for the rest of eternity, only the duration of the contract.

      • by mrchaotica ( 681592 ) * on Thursday July 21, 2016 @01:07PM (#52555777)

        And they also are under no obligation to allow out-of-contract users from continuing to use the old plan - which is exactly what they are doing here, telling the heaviest out-of-contract users to let up, move plan or Verizon will no longer do business with you.

        So? That doesn't change the fact that other users are still on the plan, and Verizon is still describing it as "unlimited" to them, which is false advertising.

        • by SirSlud ( 67381 )

          Well, it was unlimited while they allowed the grandfathered people on the plan to use it. Now that they're telling them they have to switch plans, to a plan they don't call unlimited, which will not be unlimited. I'm not sure you understand what false advertising means.

        • by Sneftel ( 15416 )

          I don't see where the false advertising is. Want to use 200 GB during August? Fine, you can do that, just as advertised, and you'll pay the advertised price for it. But you won't be a customer of theirs in September.

        • They are not 'on a plan', as in 'contract'.

          Verizon has ZERO obligation to do anything for you if you're off plan, not thing one.

          • Verizon has ZERO obligation to do anything for you if you're off plan, not thing one.

            Verizon has lots of obligations, including some to society in general (i.e., people who aren't even Verizon customers at all). Operating with good faith and fair dealing [thefreedictionary.com] is one of those obligations.

        • So? That doesn't change the fact that other users are still on the plan, and Verizon is still describing it as "unlimited" to them, which is false advertising.

          Verizon's business is with the account holder. The other people may be receiving service, but the agreement is between VZW and the account holder.

          Verizon hasn't sold "unlimited" plans for years. These people were on grandfathered plans.

          Grandfathering isn't legally guaranteed, and Verizon can change their service offering at any time. But if they can change the service since there is no longer a contract, then the customer can cancel the service for the same reason.

          Maybe Verizon deserves to have people stick

          • Certainly Verizon has the right to change the terms on grandfathered month-to-month plans whenever they see fit. I believe the issue is that they're doing so while continuing to call the plan Unlimited If they instead simply transferred all their Unlimited* plans to a newly created "100GB Bargain" plan, then there would be far less justification for calling them out. No doubt many would still call it a jerk move, but it would be an *honest* jerk move.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:53PM (#52555663)

      That has always been a shortsighted argument. They've stopped offering it, and just like you can cancel your mobile phone plan, they can too, and that's what they're doing. They are not denying you the service you pay for. They honor the contract as long as you have it, and soon you won't have it.

      What you should be pointing out is that this is a market failure: Their service is outrageously overpriced, and volume pricing does not solve congestion. It's a money-grab. In a working market with a sufficient number of competitors, no company could ask those prices or segment the market in a way that is so removed from the technical necessities. Three or four competitors might be enough with heavy-handed regulation, but not in the absence of it.

      • If you want unlimited, there are two carriers that offer it (TMobile and Sprint). Verizon's no longer choosing to do so. Don't see what that means there's a market failure here.

    • by ranton ( 36917 )

      If they didn't want unlimited use, they should never have offered it. It has pretty much always been a lie from many of these companies, and they should be fined for it. Unlimited with an asterisk defining the limitations of unlimited is not acceptable.

      Verizon doesn't offer unlimited plans, and I don't believe offers contracts longer than two years so no grandfathered unlimited users are guaranteed service for any specified period of time.

      It appears Verizon is finally admitting to the definition of unlimited data, and is adjusting their policies to be more honest about what service they are willing to offer. Obviously that does not include offering unlimited data anymore, even to grandfathered users.

  • . . . .that contracts are one-way. Now, if **I** had unilaterally decided to walk on a Verizon cell contract mid-way, I'd be paying termination fees, etc.

    Guess some Corporations are More Equal than the rest of us.

    Not that it's really news. . . .

    • They're not walking out of a contract mid-way. These are overwhelmingly out of contract customers. Every month is a new deal, and Verizon's under no obligation to renew the deal for another month.

      There may still be a very few under contract customers with unlimited and using over 100GB/month. In that case, so long as Verizon waives any ETF charges, so the customer is free to leave cost-free, Verizon's also in good shape.

    • Who is mid-contract here? Verizon stopped offering unlimited plans "a few years ago" which should put everyone on them comfortably out of contract - this is about out-of-contract users not voluntarily migrating to a different plan and being given an ultimatum.

    • by Hadlock ( 143607 )

      If they change the terms you can just walk without any early termination fees, that's also in the contract.
       
      I barely use 1GB a month as a power user, although I have a home data connection. Over the past three years DD-WRT tells me I'm using between 80 and 150 GB per month, peaking to ~250 once or twice. I have a hard time believing that those people using > 100GB/mo aren't within wifi range ever, and also won't invest in a land line to better meet their needs.

      • by gmack ( 197796 )

        Last time I went on vacation, I blew through 1 GB a week on my data plan without doing any major downloads.

      • by sims 2 ( 994794 )

        Sure but my home wifi is a verizon t1114 router with a unlimited sim its sitting at 133GB today and there are 23 days left on this cycle.

        Why? Because the only alternative is satellite or dialup (or another cell provider).
        If I could get a 10Mbps unmetered connection out here for $200/mo I would have that instead but no can be bothered to bring service out here.'

        One of my 3 unlimited lines is actually still in contract through the end of september so we shall see how that goes.

    • by Algan ( 20532 )

      I am sure that if you're in the middle of a long term contract with unlimited data use, Verizon will let you walk away with no penalty when this change comes into effect. But I would guess most unlimited users are in month to month contracts, and both they, and the company can terminate at any time. What surprises me is that both Verizon and AT&T allowed unlimited plans to be grandfathered in for so long.

      Just to make it clear where I stand: I would love to have the option of a truly unlimited plan. I do

  • Sue them for FRAUD (Score:5, Insightful)

    by UnknownSoldier ( 67820 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:34PM (#52555453)

    /Oblg. You keep using this word "unlimited". It doesn't mean what you think it means

    If Verizon is advertising their services as unlimited but it is not then it is fraud plain and simple.

    But I guess accurately calling it Nearly Unlimited won't get as many suckers ^H^H^H customers as they want.

    I hope they get sued.

    --
    Note to Redditards: The downvote button is NOT for disagreement but that "this post adds nothing interesting to the conversation."

    • by Zak3056 ( 69287 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:41PM (#52555529) Journal

      Verizon actually are NOT advertising their plans as unlimited--that's exactly the point here, the people involved are grandfathered users from a time when Verizon DID advertise such a thing (largely before 4G deployments were of real size). What it looks like here is they are telling "unlimited" users, "if you use more than 100GB we're not going to do business with you under these terms." Given that 100% of these users are out of contract (that's how they're still on unlimited plans--they haven't signed a new contract) there's no legal problem here--Verizon will just terminate their service if the user doesn't switch plans.

    • I'll never get notified of a reply, so hopefully I remember to come back and check, but why do you have a message to Reddiots on your sig? I mean this is /..
      • by Mashiki ( 184564 )

        I'll never get notified of a reply, so hopefully I remember to come back and check, but why do you have a message to Reddiots on your sig? I mean this is /..

        I'm guessing it's because there's a large swath of idiots who were never on /. in ye olde days but get mod points and like to mod things "troll or flamebait" if it's a post that hurts their feelings.

        • To be fair this post does actually add nothing to the conversation because it's entire premise is based on something that's not in fact true.

          They probably keep getting modded down because they have a habit of doing this.

  • It is unlimited. (Score:3, Informative)

    by im_thatoneguy ( 819432 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:35PM (#52555465)

    Their unlimited plan is unlimited. But if your unlimited usage is exceedingly high they can decide they don't want to sell you an unlimited plan anymore.

    I know people who setup a wifi hotspot with their unlimited Verizon plan and then serve dozens of people on job sites for months on end uploading media and video. They're not normal users. I can understand why Verizon wouldn't want them anymore.

    Similarly I use 10TB of backblaze for $50/year. I'm I imagine not-profitable. So I could understand if they told me that I have 2 months and then they don't want me as a customer anymore even though it's Unlimited. It's unlimited but not every unlimited customer is one they want. Maybe you go over one month and they allow you to spike for free. But I can see how a sustained money loser is not someone they are interested in keeping on. (Then again with backblaze I've converted numerous people to be customers and became a cloud storage customer at work so I imagine their generosity has paid off now.)

    • by TangoMargarine ( 1617195 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @01:24PM (#52555941) Journal

      Their unlimited plan is unlimited. But if your unlimited usage is exceedingly high

      By definition, a usage "exceedingly high" implies there is a limit. If there is no limit, you cannot exceed it.

      If they don't want you to have multiple users on the plan or use it for business reasons, fine--put it in the terms. There are already ways of doing that without lying.

      • Remember, these are out of contract customers. Every month is a new deal. They're offering you unlimited use in August. If you go over 100GB, they won't renew your unlimited deal for September. So, August is accurately described as unlimited.

        • But they're still punishing you for actually using the service you both agreed to if they decide not to let you re-up the next month. Maybe it's technically legal but it's still sleazy.

  • by Squiffy ( 242681 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:35PM (#52555471) Homepage

    Pray I don't alter it any further.
    - Someone's dad

    • Verizon agreed to give you unlimited data for 2 or 3 years, and you agreed to continue to use (and pay for) that service for 2 or 3 years. After that term, the agreement became month-to-month. Either side can choose to cancel it at the end of any month for any reason (actually I believe both sides have the right to cancel service at any time in the month, the company just prefers to do it at the end of the month to keep their bookkeeping cleaner).

      Verizon did not agree to give you unlimited data for $x/
  • This doesn't surprise me from a company that can't comprehend that there is a difference between 0.002 dollars and 0.002 cents.
  • So in essence..... fraud.
  • merely 120 movies a month at .7 ish gig a movie? Streaming is now hammering these tosspots who failed to invest in infrastructure (i.e. laying fibre to the home)
  • Try Upgrading (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DivineKnight ( 3763507 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:40PM (#52555511)

    "In a statement, Verizon said: "Because our network is a shared resource and we need to ensure all customers have a great mobile experience with Verizon, we are notifying a very small group of customers on unlimited plans who use an extraordinary amount of data that they must move to one of the new Verizon Plans by August 31, 2016.""

    Try upgrading your networks. It's what every network admin worth their salt inevitably does, because it works. Traffic spike? Sure, trace it, maybe limit it if it's questionable or unwanted, block it if it's illegal, etc., etc. However, as a general rule, taxes will rise, as must network capacity -> anyone here complaining that 10/100 network is perfectly fast enough, and Gig-E is overkill, would be laughed at for eons. In a few years, 10 Gig-E, or 100 Gig-E will be the norm.

    What more, if I remember correctly, Verizon has received kickbacks, tax reductions, etc. to help them finance upgrades for their networks so that this would never be an issue. I could check Verizon's financial performance over these past ten years, then look into their book-keeping (Hollywood accounting), but me thinks they have not been running at a loss. So...in the black + gifts from the US / State / Municipal governments + not upgrading their equipment = a lot of spare dosh. Has Verizon issued some dividends, or should we be looking at embezzlement charges?

    At the very least, failure to use working capital correctly (maintaining / growing the business, by buying the equipment that allows them to keep / expand their dominance in their current area) is a failure of corporate duty, and a reason for someone to be fired.

    • At the very least, failure to use working capital correctly (maintaining / growing the business, by buying the equipment that allows them to keep / expand their dominance in their current area) is a failure of corporate duty, and a reason for someone to be fired.

      Spending lots of excess money on capital equipment to add capacity to serve customers who don't pay you nearly enough to cover the investment you have to make to serve them is definitely a failure of corporate duty.

      • Then here's an idea: spend less on Executive pay, perks, mind-numbing advertising, monthly corporate junkets for yet again re-writing customer terms and conditions, attorney fees for fighting worker wages and suing the FCC, lobbying fees at state and federal capitols, and box seats at sports arenas, and re-invest all of that into providing a better product at a better price than its competitors.

        But yeah, what's the fun in all that... it's more fun to get paid and go to exclusive bars and go Hey good lookin!

    • Sure, let's spend $1,863 billion upgrading the network to 40 times its capacity. Never mind all the cell phone signal on that limited spectrum; more towers in the same spectrum will fix it, somehow!

      Polymath here with accounting, finance, and economics as side-interests. Verizon has a 7% average profit margin across its business. They've historically kept their ridiculously-high prices as low as they are by cheating the government (changing the definition of their operation, taking multi-hundred-billion-

      • Re:Try Upgrading (Score:4, Interesting)

        by SuiteSisterMary ( 123932 ) <slebrun.gmail@com> on Thursday July 21, 2016 @02:03PM (#52556207) Journal
        It really was in the space of a year or two that the average user's expectation of what 'high speed internet' should be able to do went from 'look at web pages without watching the photos load part by part, watch the occasional SD video clip on youtube or cnn.com or something, and be able to download large email attachments fairly quickly' to 'be watching four different HD video streams, simultaneously.'
    • by Ichijo ( 607641 )

      Try upgrading your networks.

      Does that always work? Are 10 wifi access points in a building 10x faster in total than 1 access point?

      It's what every network admin worth their salt inevitably does, because it works.

      Before doing so, do they do a cost-benefit analysis to determine whether the upgrade is a better use of the company's money than spending it on something else?

    • anyone here complaining that 10/100 network is perfectly fast enough, and Gig-E is overkill, would be laughed at for eons. In a few years, 10 Gig-E, or 100 Gig-E will be the norm.

      56k should be enough for user.

  • Duh? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Win0ver ( 613215 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @12:41PM (#52555523)
    FTA: "These users are using data amounts well in excess of our largest plan size (100GB)."

    Well duh, isn't that the whole point of getting an unlimited data plan? Using more data than the capped ones?
    • They offered the unlimited plans when 3G phones were the norm. Those plans have been unavailable for a long time.

      The 100 GB plan costs 5x what the old unlimited plan was. Mostly because of 4G and the prevalence of smartphones and streaming apps.

  • This will replace DSL in non fios areas as they profit big time with 100 GB at $375

  • by sims 2 ( 994794 )

    I received a phone call from the vzw loyalty team this morning they wanted to do an account review but as was on the way to work (talking on cellphones while driving is still legal here) I said not right now and they left it at that.

    I suppose this must be what they wanted to talk about.
    My home line is over 133GB this month and I still have 23 days left on this billing cycle. So I suppose i'll be switching to one of att's unlimited plans this month I figure that will run me about $2,000 to buy one but still

  • Business is Business (Score:2, Informative)

    by Etcetera ( 14711 )

    Look, there's nothing wrong with being a rational actor on both sides here. The original contract is over and every single person on one of these plans is month to month. A partnership or business relationship not otherwise restricted will only exist for as long as it makes sense for both sides.

    You idiots abusing a shared resource have pushed Verizon into accepting a PR hit in exchange for not having to deal with your douchebaggery any more. So be it. This is why we can't have nice things.

    Anyone who's ever

  • OK, I am the first to say VZW is the worst, but in this case people can't complain. They were stupid enough to sell "unlimited" data, so they would now be in the wrong if they made the "unlimited" have a limit (yes, they would love to do just that of course), but instead they are just deciding it makes no financial sense to them to keep these customers on. Similar to how you decide VZW makes no financial sense to you and you drop them, a company can do the same (following the terms of the contract), the are

    • So THIS explains how my Super was selling Internet to everyone in my building for $50 bucks a month (he called it the "grandfather plan"), and why the service crapped out whenever he took his mobile outside to take a phone call!

  • My sister-in-law had a voice-only plan that was $15 per month and kept it for over a decade. While using the toilet at work, her phone slipped out of her pocket and fell into the toilet. Of course, it was an auto flush toilet. Bye-bye, phone. The carrier refused to sell her a new phone on the old plan. That's how she got an iPhone and became a data junkie like the rest of us.
  • I've downloaded 95GB since 11pm yesterday, purely because I happened to buy the latest Humble Bundle, which includes (amongst others) NBA 2K16 at over 44GB of downloadable game.

    100GB per month? Per day, perhaps.

  • If you people would wean yourselves off your compulsive over-use of your phones instead of being glued to them 24/7/365, you probably wouldn't even need any of their overpriced dataplans to start with, and none of you would be faced with this problem in the first place.
  • by bagofbeans ( 567926 ) on Thursday July 21, 2016 @01:21PM (#52555917)

    If it's really "a very small group of customers", why do Verizon care?

  • And when they claim data hog, show them European prices - they are MUCH MUCH cheaper than American.

  • I love these PR things where it's just flat out contradictory statements: such a small portion of people *but* they are causing such a big problem *but* if they pay more money the problem is solved.

    Although, they must have a pretty good network if people can get over 100gb per month. On my provider that would probably take a year.

  • All you can eat, should be all you can eat.
    Yet, another failure of the federal trade commission.

  • So Verizon is basically saying they are unable to provide adequate service unless they kick off some users. They should lower their prices then. In the last couple of years the quality of my Verizon services has gotten noticeably worse. Dead zones, slow response (should it take 24 hours for an SMS to be delivered to someone 10 ft away?), etc. I have actually wondered if they are removing cell towers in the area because coverage is so spotty, where before it seemed excellent. Verizon used to be good but they
  • "Because our network is a shared resource and we need to ensure all customers have a great mobile experience with Verizon,"

    So you're saying wireless isn't as fast as wired and is like cable. Thanks for being honest Verizon. Now let's stop pushing this wireless crap down peoples throats and roll out some more fiber. Now stop preventing Google Fiber from competing and sell off you FIOS division so someone else can do it spread fiber since you won't do it.

Each new user of a new system uncovers a new class of bugs. -- Kernighan

Working...