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Most Companies Will Require You To Bring Your Own Mobile Device By 2017 381

Posted by samzenpus
from the get-your-own dept.
Lucas123 writes "Half of all employers will require workers to supply their own mobile devices for work purposes by 2017, according to a new Gartner study. Enterprises that offer only corporately-owned smartphones or stipends to buy your own will soon become the exception to the rule in the next few years. As enterprise BYOD programs proliferate, 38% of companies expect to stop providing devices to workers by 2016 and let them use their own, according to a global survey of CIOs by Gartner. At the same time, security remains the top BYOD concern. 'What happens if you buy a device for an employee and they leave the job a month later? How are you going to settle up? Better to keep it simple. The employee owns the device, and the company helps to cover usage costs,' said David Willis, a distinguished analyst at Gartner."
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Most Companies Will Require You To Bring Your Own Mobile Device By 2017

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  • So.... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Mitreya (579078) <mitreya&gmail,com> on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @10:13PM (#43605997)

    As enterprise BYOD programs proliferate, 38% of companies expect to stop providing devices to workers by 2016 and let them use their own

    Do they get to monitor communications or wipe my own device now if anything goes wrong?

    • Re:So.... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by admdrew (782761) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @10:19PM (#43606027) Homepage
      Yeah, there's software [mobileiron.com] out there to do exactly that, that a lot of employers (I'm in the network security field) already require to be installed if you want to connect to work resources.
      • Re:So.... (Score:5, Interesting)

        by afidel (530433) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @10:29PM (#43606083)

        I see the future of BYOD being running another OS instance for the work apps, or possibly a separate easily switched profile with encrypted storage. One of the biggest hurdles right now with iOS and BYOD is that the end user can easily recover the wiped data from their last icloud backup. There are similar concerns with personal Dropbox accounts, how do you regain control of your corporate data once it's on an account that the user controls? There are solutions to the problem like windows rights management server (DRM for corporate documents) but they don't tend to play well with machines that aren't part of the central infrastructure, and are especially poor at support non-PC platforms.

        • by admdrew (782761)
          Agreed, although the Dropbox-related concern has already existed on regular work machines (assuming you're able to install software, which many people in technical roles are allowed to do).
          • by NemosomeN (670035)
            I have a separate hard drive on my personal computer to boot from when I work from home, and I would love to be able to seamlessly use my phone to connect to work as well. Given the choice between my employer's giving me a non-android device (Given that my current phone is android based) and my bringing my own device, I would much rather bring my own device.
            • Re:So.... (Score:4, Interesting)

              by Dcnjoe60 (682885) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @08:40AM (#43608353)

              I have a separate hard drive on my personal computer to boot from when I work from home, and I would love to be able to seamlessly use my phone to connect to work as well. Given the choice between my employer's giving me a non-android device (Given that my current phone is android based) and my bringing my own device, I would much rather bring my own device.

              Would you have that same feeling if your employer insisted on being able to monitor your calls, texts, data and other uses of your personal phone plus have the capabilities to wipe it? That is what the OP is saying his company does.

        • Re:So.... (Score:5, Informative)

          by ArhcAngel (247594) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @11:04PM (#43606259)

          I see the future of BYOD being running another OS instance for the work apps, or possibly a separate easily switched profile with encrypted storage.

          So...BlackBerry Balance [informationweek.com] then

          • Re:So.... (Score:5, Interesting)

            by afidel (530433) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @11:16PM (#43606303)

            Yes, and VMWare ready for Android devices, and the user profiles from Android 4.2 refined, and the encrypted partition and app space from Good, and a whole host of other existing solutions, but if BYOD is going to become pervasive it's going to need to be built in at the system level and be easy to manage (I have to give RIM credit, balance does a pretty good job of meeting all these needs, it's just a second tier platform at this point).

            • by PNutts (199112)

              I expect to get the living hell modded out of me when I say the iPhone has been a secure platform for BYOD for awhile now (I don't remember if it's the 3GS or 4 where security was tightened up). Besides the Configurator, something as humble as ActiveSync can manage them. Same goes for many of the latest Android devices. The point is it's easy to natively get strong security on a mobile device. How good it meets your needs depends on your needs.

              • by admdrew (782761)
                Yeah, exactly. I'm on Android, and within the last year our standard connection to our work Exchange server required me to accept some basic management settings (remote wiping included) just to be able to pull my mail down, no extra software needed.
                • Re:So.... (Score:5, Insightful)

                  by Dcnjoe60 (682885) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @08:55AM (#43608427)

                  Yeah, exactly. I'm on Android, and within the last year our standard connection to our work Exchange server required me to accept some basic management settings (remote wiping included) just to be able to pull my mail down, no extra software needed.

                  You shouldn't have signed away your rights like that. Maybe you are comfortable giving your employer access to all the data on your phone, including photos, passwords and everything else. Most people probably would think the pictures you took in Vegas aren't any of your employer's business. Out of curiousity, if you change those basic management settings, does your email still work? If not, then something more than just settings was done to your phone, maybe software was installed remotely?

                  Personally, if my employer feels I need access to email or to be reached 24/7, it is their responsibility to provide the means for that. They do not have the right to takeover my personal property or data just because I work there. Put differently, if there is a business reason for them needing me to receive emails/texts/calls outside of normal working hours, then they should provide a business solution. If I want to do it for my own convenience on my own device, well, then I would have to weigh the convenience against all the privacy issues involved.

                  • Re:So.... (Score:4, Interesting)

                    by Martin Blank (154261) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @11:58AM (#43610777) Journal

                    I'm right there with you. As one of the security people involved with implementing BYOD (though somewhat peripherally) at my last job, I opted to keep the Blackberry issued to me rather than attach my phone to the enterprise network even though I had admin access to the system. Many people thought I was nuts, but I draw a fairly clear line between work and personal life. Knowing what can be monitored, I opted to maintain that line.

                    I think that might be one of the things people don't realize, even if they read what the company should be supplying. The mobile device security industry is changing rapidly with hooks going much deeper than they used to. One product that we looked at (but didn't implement) allowed not only monitoring of call logs but copied all text and MMS messages to or from the device up to the server for archiving, something I viewed as far too invasive for BYOD. Even if it was deleted immediately from the device, the software grabbed it and copied it up (or archived it for copying if data wasn't available). But with companies clambering over each other for features, I'm sure it wasn't long before others added it to their own lists.

                • by gottabeme (590848)

                  And what's to stop you from running an app that tells the Exchange server you've accepted those settings and then ignore them?

              • Re:So.... (Score:5, Insightful)

                by SvnLyrBrto (62138) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @02:24AM (#43607061)

                I'm as big a fan of the iPhone as anyone, but the tools you mention don't work for BYOD. They're great for company owned and managed devices. But it's not "Your Own Device" if you're letting someone else control it with those profiles or activesync connections. If I've paid for hardware with my own money, it's mine... period, full stop. No one else gets admin, root, remote-wipe, find my iPhone, or whatever privileges but me.

                I'd allow a company-controlled encrypted partition or something. But *I* retain control of *my* device as a whole. Apple's tools don't yet allow such a solution.

                • Re:So.... (Score:5, Insightful)

                  by mabhatter654 (561290) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @05:09AM (#43607505)

                  That's exactly the point, and that's how it's being sold. From my companies boss, he wants to give everybody a stipend for "a device" load up Citrix and said lockdown for company days, then let them do whatever they want.

                  So basically his version of BYOD is letting you use "any"device but the company is still going to tell YOU what to do with it. Extend that to the cheap-ass employers that will just expect you to bring your OWN PAID FOR device in and bastard IT people that wipe YOUR data whenever the boss says.

                  It's a whole "bag of hurt" for legal reasons as well. Jailbreaking, personal medical or legal data, not to mention music or media (and porn) all being carried around the workplace all day. It's an HR nightmare! I have just enough ODD to put clopping fan service as a screensaver just to piss one of those chea ass bosses off.

                • Re:So.... (Score:5, Interesting)

                  by Rich0 (548339) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @07:34AM (#43608021) Homepage

                  I'm as big a fan of the iPhone as anyone, but the tools you mention don't work for BYOD.

                  What you aren't getting is that "Bring Your Own Device" really just means "Pay For The Company's Device."

                  The company treats it like they own it. They get admin access. They lock the user from setting preferences (like screen lock settings, etc). They wipe it if they decide they don't need you any longer. They specify what kind of device you can bring.

                  Basically you're buying a device, then leasing it free of charge to the company for the duration of your employment. You get it back when you quit.

                  • by Dcnjoe60 (682885)

                    I'm as big a fan of the iPhone as anyone, but the tools you mention don't work for BYOD.

                    What you aren't getting is that "Bring Your Own Device" really just means "Pay For The Company's Device."

                    The company treats it like they own it. They get admin access. They lock the user from setting preferences (like screen lock settings, etc). They wipe it if they decide they don't need you any longer. They specify what kind of device you can bring.

                    Basically you're buying a device, then leasing it free of charge to the company for the duration of your employment. You get it back when you quit.

                    I already commented or I would mod you up, but that is exactly what is going on. If a company has a business reason that you need access to mail and other company resources 24/7 then they should provide the device. If there is no business reason for it, then why would anybody voluntarily want to do this and trade away their privacy to boot?

              • Re:So.... (Score:5, Insightful)

                by oldlurker (2502506) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @04:58AM (#43607467)

                I expect to get the living hell modded out of me when I say the iPhone has been a secure platform for BYOD for awhile now (I don't remember if it's the 3GS or 4 where security was tightened up). Besides the Configurator, something as humble as ActiveSync can manage them. Same goes for many of the latest Android devices. The point is it's easy to natively get strong security on a mobile device. How good it meets your needs depends on your needs.

                If you let company admin access to lock and wipe your device, control what apps you install and use - like fx very insecure data-syncing services like icloud/dropbox, etc. then it is not really your personal BYOD device anymore, it is a company device. If you don't have this, the device is not company secure (it doesn't help enforcing local device encryption and password policies to prevent access to company data if you are leaking same company data to highly insecure consumer cloud services or in other ways setting up and using your phone in an insecure way).

                As several others have said on the thread already, the answer for BYOD security is that the phone needs to be running a controlled separate/virtual environment for the company that is completely walled off from the personal part of your phone.

      • >> there's software out there to (monitor communications or wipe my own device)

        My current employer has a BYOD policy and software for this. My solution: never use a personal device for work purposes, especially never company email. Instead, I use a company-resident mail forwarding application to read my company email and to send alerts to a personal email address if it finds something that looks interesting enough and I've been out of the office long enough (e.g., more than a day). If I do get such

        • by admdrew (782761)
          Yup, I'd agree, and if/when my employer implements such software I will likely disable work email on my phone.
        • I just don't check work email when at home.
          You want to reach me after work?
          They have my phone number.
          If they really want me to check email they can give me a phone or whatever.
      • I'm perfectly happy having corporate e-mail on a phone I pay for 100%, but I refuse to allow anyone to have control over my phone but me. My company encourages e-mail on our personal phones but require stock firmware, non-rooted, the ability to remote wipe, and the ability to change security settings on my phone. I'm fine if there is a requirement that I have remote wipe ability but I should be the only one in control of it. And telling me that I can't run alternitive firmware due to "security concerns" is
      • Re:So.... (Score:5, Insightful)

        by ryanov (193048) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @01:35AM (#43606887)

        If it's my device that I paid for, I *don't* want to connect to work resources. Fuck that. My device, my number, none of your business.

      • Re:So.... (Score:5, Informative)

        by Solandri (704621) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @02:40AM (#43607083)
        Samsung is already working on [anandtech.com] a solution [businessinsider.com] to that [samsung.com]. Basically, instead of your employer having full run of the phone, all the employer stuff is put into a sandboxed instance of the OS. Your personal phone runs into another sandboxed instance. Like having two virtual machines running simultaneously, you can flip between the two. Your employer has full control over one, and you have full control over the other.

        I'm a little skeptical of how well it'll work in practice (backups will probably be problematic). But if they can pull it off, it will eliminate the need to carry two phones just because your workplace wants full access and control.
    • by mysidia (191772)

      Do they get to monitor communications or wipe my own device now if anything goes wrong?

      If you're connected using Active Sync, your employer can already wipe your device, using an Active Sync wipe request.

      Manufacturers that license the ActiveSync protocol are required to implement this as specified, on their device, so the device must honor the wipe request.

      Don't associate your device with your org's Exchange server, if you don't want your employer to be able to wipe it.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    ...when it gets tied up in legal proceedings. This brings its own set of complications.

  • Can they remote wipe? Pull your GPS data? contacts? logs?
    • by admdrew (782761)
      Depending on the software they force employees to install: yes, not sure/maybe, yes, and yes.
    • by PNutts (199112)

      To answer the question in your subject, the company owns the company data and you own your data. Unfortunately, on most devices without a third party solution your personal data is wiped along with the company's. The capabilities of Mobile Device Management software are very intrusive.

  • by MarioMax (907837) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @10:23PM (#43606045)

    At my company there is a lot of internal chatter about BYOD, along with the security concerns (especially in terms of IP).

    My stance: Just say no to BYOD. If my company deems it necessary for me to use a portable electronic device to perform my job, then either:
    a) They supply it, and it remains company property, or
    b) There is no option b

    • by vux984 (928602) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @10:49PM (#43606185)

      Option b) is that it's my device and all that entails, I control it, not them. No different than my car, if I leave the company it's still mine. If something belonging to them is in the trunk, they can politely ask that it be returned, but they don't get a set of keys, or have permission to enter it.

      If they don't like these terms, well... then its back to your option "a)"

      BYOD is no different than using a personal car, or a breifcase, and having company documents in either.

      • by PNutts (199112) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @11:16PM (#43606299)

        BYOD is no different than using a personal car, or a breifcase, and having company documents in either.

        It's very different. There are regulations about how different classifications of data can be moved around and stored. You can have things on your phone that you can't have in a briefcase in your car. And there is more opportunity for a phone to be lost or stolen.

        • by admdrew (782761)

          There are regulations about how different classifications of data can be moved around and stored.

          Employers that follow those regulations/classifications probably won't require (or even allow) BYOD, so I would agree with vux984 that they aren't really different from other methods of taking company data off-site.

        • by spire3661 (1038968) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @12:08AM (#43606523) Journal
          If regulatory issues are a concern, then it really shouldn't be BYOD.
        • by vux984 (928602)

          There are regulations about how different classifications of data can be moved around and stored.

          When you say "classifications" you mean "Classified", etc? Ok, fair enough. I can't really imagine a situation where I'd be asked to carry those around in my own phone, though.

          You can have things on your phone that you can't have in a briefcase in your car.

          I'm hard pressed to imagine what I could have on my phone that couldn't be in a thumbdrive in my breifcase.

          And there is more opportunity for a phone to be lo

        • by Sentrion (964745)

          And unless the company dictates that I have to own and drive X vehicle with Y specifications, or carry P briefcase with Q specifications, they better be ready to accept that I may show up to work on a bicycle with work documents rolled up in an opening in the frame.

          What is much more likely is that in 2017 companies will develop a preference for independent contractors who show up (perhaps virtually from their living room in their PJs) to perform work on specific projects rather than full time staff that has

    • by ras (84108)

      How about this for an option b:

      You make use of Android's "multiuser" feature. Work is one user, your personal life is the other. Android guarantees there is a 100% opaque firewall between the two users, so if work sends an "erase phone" command it erases their user, not the phone.

      This pretty much solves the privacy and control aspects. The remaining downside is work still expects you to pay for tools to do the job they ask of you. But hey, at least you only have to carry one device.

  • Yeah, right. (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    They had better give me a stipend to buy my own machine, then, because I'm only going to use it for working with their company. In fact, it will never leave the office. No way in HELL are they going to be able to lay a claim on my personal equipment just because they want to lower their parts and labor costs.

  • A company paying $75 or so for monthly smartphone service pays for itself many times over in keeping employees tethered to the business and available for around-the-clock email and messaging. I expect companies will continue paying for service even for BYOD shops. If forcing employees to purchase a phone discourages them from using a phone for work then it will be a huge loss for companies.
    • by Anonymous Psychopath (18031) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @11:35PM (#43606395) Homepage

      A company paying $75 or so for monthly smartphone service pays for itself many times over in keeping employees tethered to the business and available for around-the-clock email and messaging. I expect companies will continue paying for service even for BYOD shops. If forcing employees to purchase a phone discourages them from using a phone for work then it will be a huge loss for companies.

      This is how it works where I am (Fortune 500 technology company). The company pays all the service, including my personal calls and data use, and I pay for the phone. They negotiate shorter contract terms and lower up-front device costs. I get my choice of carriers and devices. They also negotiate discounted service pricing for my family.

      The company does not wipe my entire device when I disconnect it from their system and remove their MDM, they just delete their content and leave everything else alone. They do enforce screen lock timeouts and require a PIN or password. They will wipe my device in its entirety if it's stolen.

      This is a sane BYOD policy that balances the desire of the employees to have a choice in their electronic tether with their needs to secure their IP.

  • by Kell Bengal (711123) on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @10:30PM (#43606095)
    I don't want a smart phone. I choose not to use one - I only care to have a simple phone that does the bare minimum. If they want me to have a smart phone, they'd better provide it for me because I will not spend my own money for a device I choose not to have. Under Australian law (to which I am subject) I don't believe a company can force you to provide your own equipment.
    • by admdrew (782761)
      Typically (in what I've seen in IT) they're not *forcing* people to bring their own devices, they're *allowing* them (or suggesting them) to do so. I highly doubt that a company that requires an employee to have a smart phone of some kind in their role would require them to use their own phone.
    • by Misagon (1135)

      While your current company may not be able to force you, the situation changes if you are laid off.
      The next company you apply to could choose not to hire you because of your objection.

      I choose not to use a cell phone at all, because of various reasons, the most important being that radiation kills brain cells. I find that some prospective employers don't want to hire me because of my objection, even though the work entails sitting at the same desk all the time.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Actually, they're refusing to hire you because you reject logic and science in favor of fearmongering and confirmation bias.

  • Is this the same Gartner who once said a web seminar that Apache and Linux would not have any significance in the web server market?
  • You'd be better off looking at tea leaves than trusting anything that comes from that money hole.
  • Not much of an issue for devops folks but a big issue in sales and marketing.
    I wonder if companies allow a sales phone number be switch to a competitor when the sales person switches jobs. This is what happens when Jane changes jobs.

    Customer of company A calls Jane who has just gone to company B:
    Jane: "Hi Sam, I am glad you called. I now work for B and let me tell you how their product is much better for you..."

    There are other jobs like customer support that have similar problems. In this case you want y

    • by admdrew (782761)

      I wonder if companies allow a sales phone number be switch to a competitor when the sales person switches jobs.

      If a company changes their procedures to allow employees to use their own phones instead of handing them out, they'll also change their procedures about phone numbers. My company simply uses internal numbers assigned to everyone (that they control), that we can forward to our personal phones if need be; this isn't an issue for companies already allowing BYOD.

  • I worked for a state office where the I.T. staff were all issued cell phones. They were issued because we had it set up to broadcast texts to us when something went wrong. A new administration comes in and the first thing they do is confiscate all cell phones.

    I casually mention to our advance guy that all the notifications for server issues go out to said cell phones. We had them back the next day.
  • All of the mentioned restrictions only work if the phone is locked.
    I refuse to sign a contract, or get a locked phone (at least that I pay for).
    I have a N1 (never locked), and will probably upgrade before long to a new, never locked, phone. You don't need to unlock if it was never locked in the first place.
    If my employer wants that control, they can pay for it.

    I've saved the cost of my current phone with lower monthly bills. A single payment up front saves money in the end.
    Freedom isn't free, but it doesn't have to cost a lot.
  • roaming costs? big plans can have good data rates your own not so much.

    • by tompaulco (629533)

      roaming costs? big plans can have good data rates your own not so much.

      My previous company owned the phones and gave them out to individuals. Project Managers, who tended to stay at the office, got 1200 minutes, while technical staff, who tended to have to go out to client sites for two weeks at a stretch, got 500 minutes. I ended up going over a time or two, and was called in to explain myself. On those occasions, I discovered that the corporate plan that the company subscribed to cost about double what an individuals plan would cost with the same minutes. I guess AT&Ts

  • And who exactly pulled that out of their ass? No personal devices at my work, period. Same everywhere that has an IT dept worth half a shit.
    • by admdrew (782761)
      I don't know what your work does, but this is definitely starting to become common at many places. While I certainly don't want to relinquish admin control over my personal phone, I also like the the ability to remotely connect to work resources without needing to carry around two phones.
  • by kurt555gs (309278) <kurt555gs@nOSPAm.ovi.com> on Wednesday May 01, 2013 @11:33PM (#43606385) Homepage

    I remember talking with a very successful businessman a long time ago. He asked me if I knew the diference between a job and a career? I said no. He said, it's simple, in a career you get screwed out of your overtime.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday May 02, 2013 @12:02AM (#43606505)

    Cellphones are one of the absolute most personal things ever created. Imagine if there's a legal dispute, and your company subpoena's your cellphone, or because you are using it for work, naturally asume they have the right to look at everything you've done. Oh, you're carefully protected friends list?, theirs. Your banking information?, theirs. Your pornography collection, (whether or not you've actually used it for such at work), theirs. Wife sends you a teasing pic during the day, which your forgot to delete, Manager looks at it, fired for sexual harassment.

    In an ideal world, they wouldn't have access to anything on your phone, but the way things are going, anything used for work is considered fair game.

    Also, yes, security, but that's nothing compared to the privacy implications.

  • Usual nonsense (Score:5, Insightful)

    by russotto (537200) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @12:08AM (#43606519) Journal

    1) Take a short and small trend.
    2) Do a linear extrapolation that shows a ridiculous result.
    3) ????
    4) Profit

    ObXKCD [xkcd.com]

  • by Teddy Beartuzzi (727169) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @12:25AM (#43606595) Journal
    Should I be buying my own desk? My own chair? Hell, my cubicle walls are clearly my responsibility too, right? If a company thinks an employee needs something for their job, then they should provide it.
  • by the_Bionic_lemming (446569) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @12:31AM (#43606623)

    Um no.

    I'm the employee, you are the employer.

    I come in ready to work, you supply the tools for me to work.

    The tools are yours, you can monitor, adjust, replace, revoke, and have Orwellian standards on them. That's because you employed me and provided them.

    Past that? fuck off.

  • by Maxo-Texas (864189) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @12:35AM (#43606635)

    Gartner gives atrocious advice. I get it- it used to be good and then it was good because people did what it said.

    But for the last five or six years, it just throws things out there and sees if they stick on the wall.

    Former company I worked for followed Gartners advice. It was terrible. But, because it came from Gartner, no one could get fired for following it. Reminds me of IBM.

  • security nightmare (Score:4, Informative)

    by dutchwhizzman (817898) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @01:26AM (#43606847)
    Gartner is so incredibly wrong here. You can't control a plethora of devices connecting to your office network. In reality, you'll have to assume that all devices that connect to you are inherently evil and users using them will be snooped on and their logon credentials will get sniffed. This means you first have to "weaponize" every application you run on your IT infrastructure and make it available as a web service. You'll have to issue two-factor authentication that uses a dynamic element such as a challenge/response hardware key generator. Only when you have everything like that in place, you can "safely" start using BYOD in a corporate environment. By then, there is no more need for people to actually be in the office to do their work, apart from meetings. For meetings, you can always call in or video conference from home. Effectively, the only way to pay for this is to quit renting office space and go completely virtual. Because you no longer rent office space, renting a separate server room will cost you dearly and you'll need your admins to have office space close to that room, so you're still running a brick company. Going to "the cloud" will be more or less mandatory for such a company, from an economic view point. I don't see a significant amount of companies do all this within the next four years. I do see a lot trying to save a few bucks on the abysmal hardware budgets they already have and fail horribly at productivity and security and reverse their decisions, spending much more in the process and not gaining anything.
  • by Scot Seese (137975) on Thursday May 02, 2013 @02:04AM (#43607011)

    Awesome, so as an employee *I* have to pay for my $700 smartphone -AND- the expectation will exist that I will be monitoring emails nights and weekends?

    What a bargain for your employer, by chipping in $50-100/mo to pay for a fraction of your service plan, they get up to 20 hours per week of additional work out of you, according to this study:
    http://www.techvibes.com/blog/byod-trend-is-making-employees-work-an-extra-20-hours-per-week-report-suggests-2012-08-22 [techvibes.com]

    This, on top of inflation-adjusted real wages that have not increased since 1973:
    http://blogs.wsj.com/moneybeat/2013/04/16/the-best-indicator-of-u-s-health-is-wage-growth-or-lack-thereof/ [wsj.com]

    Slashdot headline next summer: "BYO Desk all the rage among newer workers"

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