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Cellphones Handhelds Operating Systems

Nokia's 808 PureView Officially the End of the Symbian Line 102

Posted by timothy
from the please-turn-out-the-lights dept.
Snirt writes "Symbian is now officially dead, Nokia confirmed today. In the company's earnings announcement that came out a little while ago, Nokia confirmed that the 808 PureView, released last year, was the very last device that the company would make on the Symbian platform: 'During our transition to Windows Phone through 2012, we continued to ship devices based on Symbian,' the company wrote. 'The Nokia 808 PureView, a device which showcases our imaging capabilities and which came to market in mid-2012, was the last Symbian device from Nokia.'"
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Nokia's 808 PureView Officially the End of the Symbian Line

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday January 24, 2013 @03:38PM (#42683545)

    I didn't like it when the Symbians kidnapped Patty Hearst, but their phones were OK for a while.

    • by TheCarp (96830)

      wow, I never would have guessed something that big was a phone, every video I have ever seen that featured them showed some woman straddling it and enjoying its strong vibrate function.... not sure how you talk on it though, must be a bluetooth headset.

      • Possibly the best news about the end of Symbian, is the end of people thinking they've just thought up that joke.

    • by 1s44c (552956)

      I didn't like it when the Symbians kidnapped Patty Hearst, but their phones were OK for a while.

      Maybe the Symbionese Liberation Army will reform at this news and go on a round of kidnapping Nokia execs.

  • by johanw (1001493) on Thursday January 24, 2013 @03:50PM (#42683689)
    Symbian phones were very feature complete (much more so than Android and iOS, my E72 has functionality that even now isn't standard on those) and I don't like to see it go. I still use a Nokia E72 as my primary phone and plan to do so for some more years, I even bought a spare used E72 in case something happens to it. Now that rooting Symbian is easy I even get functionality that was Android specific for some time, like adblocking with a hostsfile. And of course a week of battary use, get that from any current device.
    • by amiga3D (567632)

      I'm wondering since Symbian is open source now if someone else will make any Symbian phones.

      • by gstoddart (321705) on Thursday January 24, 2013 @04:07PM (#42683857) Homepage

        I'm betting you'd only get the core OS, but most of the stuff related to actual telephony would be patented/proprietary.

        I'd be surprised if you could fully operate your phone with the open source bits -- but admittedly, that's mostly just a guess.

        • by gl4ss (559668) on Thursday January 24, 2013 @05:43PM (#42684811) Homepage Journal

          well, of symbian^4 (or 4 or wtf it was supposed to be, who the fuck knows since apparently whenever they reorganized the new guy at the top thought that instead of fixing things it was just important to rename things) you would've gotten the ui(and well, not that much else relevant for making a phone..).

          it was axed though(the four), but they did do one public commit of the tree at least which included homescreen. around the axing they decided to go all qml.
          so you'd get some ui pieces for a dead tree.

          and earlier symbian source.. well, if you want to go insane, take a look. there's really nothing that much worthwhile saving there without properiaty phone stack to go along with it.. so you could run the whole phone on a single arm chip or execute in place from rom. symbian did some neat tricks like that, but with current chip pricing they don't matter that much.

          the reason why the story isn't pretty is that always they just went adding api's instead of fixing them. as if stacking an extra api on top of a broken one would fix the broken api underneath! how the fuck that's supposed to work? I'll suddenly get videoframes from the original api underneath by adding an extra layer on top of it? it wasn't most of the time that big of a problem that the api was totally obscure to use but that it was just plain unimplemented to do half the things it should have done now that was a real problem! but due to the totally broken chain of authority nobody could be arsed to do the work to actually tell people to do the fucking fixes. this plays a major role in why the whole symbian got axed and dumped, the organization was deemed to be bloated beyond repairable, employing 10x the people needed and that just impaired the development - every reorg they did just made things worse and at the height of the organizations size they were still relying on contractors for writing critical pieces of code all the way from kernel to ui. another reason of course is that elop is one lazy fat bastard and this was a very easy way out of the mess for him - just take n9's shell, license sw from MS and call it a day - or rather call it two years of work in a day, but hey at least he didn't have to deal with aholes who had entrenched themselves as guardians of buggy code.

          and they should just have gone android. or rather they should have done the open source aspect of symbian properly back in the day and should have made symbian into what became android. you don't execute a successful open source strategy by at the same time releasing source while you lock the platform from unauthorized code!

          anyone doing a new phone os now from existing base is just going to go android now, jolla excluded and even them I think would have done better to go with android and extend it.. instead of what they're doing now. easy to find drivers/socs, plenty of sw.. complete open source package to roll the os with and less chance of just going clinically insane.

          • Symbian weren't allowed break APIs. With C++ it's actually quite easy to do, so newer APIs were added. series60, which has nothing to do with SymbianOS, may be another matter. Phone manufacturers were also free to choose which functionality they supported.
            • by gl4ss (559668)

              Symbian weren't allowed break APIs. With C++ it's actually quite easy to do, so newer APIs were added. series60, which has nothing to do with SymbianOS, may be another matter. Phone manufacturers were also free to choose which functionality they supported.

              look, nobody should give a fuck about symbian circa 2002 which is what you're talking about. when s60 skyrocketed nokia took over symbian, they held all the cards and called all the shots and seperate symbianos releases straight from symbian ltd like crystal were dead right there and then. they kept up a facade for purpose of licensing it to 3rd parties but were never into it with whole heart, sony excluded but their uiq phones were very marginal on the market and held very little power at symbian as conseq

      • by gl4ss (559668)

        symbian open source was always back-and-forth lipservice and confusion. they never did it properly and always restarted and backpedaled, reorganized and reshuffled, put repos up and down...

        the state was such that there's this legend that you could get it to boot on a beagle.

        frankly if someone would pick it up and try to turn it into a working product from that they would be in a legal minefield AND IN AN INSANE ASYLUM AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!fewr junk fewe

    • by kwark (512736)

      "Symbian phones were very feature complete (much more so than Android and iOS, my E72 has functionality that even now isn't standard on those) and I don't like to see it go."

      So what are the others missing? Please tell us so we can still get a decent Symbian phone before they are gone.

      • by johanw (1001493)
        Well, things some service providers didn't like like sending files over Bluetooth n(of infrared for the models that had that). My E72 has out of the box functionality to choose which phone calls can be directly diverted to /dev/null or voicemail. It comes with a dictionary and office reading software, and, most importantly, with offline navigation. It uses a decent profile system so when I'm at work I can set it to vibrate only with just changing profiles. Added software can even do that automatically on a
        • I'm pretty sure I've tethered my Android phones in bluetooth before.. though not a phone initiated file send... Google voice lets me group senders and have different groups respond differently, I know there are add-ons to do so on the device. Profiles would be nice, I mean more than airplane or silent. I've been a bit of an android fan for a while though, since the G1... though my Nexus 4 is the first phone I actually liked all around (three nits with it though)... Hopefully they'll advance more. I'm ho
        • by kwark (512736)

          Well, I only used a more or less stock Android till 1.6. Cyanogen after that but:
          "sending files over Bluetooth n(of infrared for the models that had that)"
          used this once to send something to a stock Milestone years ago. It worked (OBEX). Wasn't available in 1.x.

          "out of the box functionality to choose which phone calls can be directly diverted to /dev/null or voicemail."
          sending to voicemail is standard since 2.x. Ignore with an free app.

          "It uses a decent profile system so when I'm at work I can set it to vib

      • by GNious (953874)

        My old Nokia Symbian had DLNA/UPnP and VoIP/SIP support out of the box.
        My brand-new Samsung Android has neither, but requires me to download 3rd party apps for this.

        • by jrumney (197329)
          VoIP/SIP support is there in Android, it's just fairly well hidden (not in the main Settings menu, but in the Phone application's Settings menu, labelled as "Accounts", not to be confused with another menu labelled "Accounts" that controls the contact syncing with various providers). DLNA is an add on - most Samsung phones have it out of the box (branded as AllShare), I'm not sure why yours doesn't.
      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        I got an N85 in 2008 (still using it) and it had tons of stuff that other phones at the time did not. A 5 MP camera, the ability to install apps from any source (including game emulators), ability to watch flash videos, FM radio (including an FM transmitter), an actual filesystem that you could access, offline turn by turn navigation, the ability to connect to an Microsoft Exchange server to name a few. I also had an N770 which had the full power of a Linux system. Meego was suppose to combine the two, b

      • by peppepz (1311345)
        Battery life.
    • by ras (84108)

      It's sad, but my retired Symbian E70 remains to this day a better phone than any modern smart phone. It is smaller, faster to make a phone call, the battery lasted a week, the loud speaker was louder, the microphone is it was so good we ended using in preference to dedicated devices for recording messages, the native SIP stack in it (and we are talking 5 years go now) was better and more reliable than in Android 4.2.1 today, it could be doing several things and still play music and podcasts without a singl

    • by mirix (1649853)

      I see your E72 as a primary phone, and raise you my E71. Getting a bit long in the tooth at this point, though...

      To me, hardware keyboard, world class reception, and a battery that lasts a week is more important than most other stuff.

      I've been considering getting an android for random computing on, though. (But I'd keep the nokia for calls and text).

  • by VP (32928) on Thursday January 24, 2013 @03:53PM (#42683725)

    What is worse is that it is hard to find any existing Symbian devices...

    For all the drawbacks of Symbian, the combination of a camera that put to shame any other cellphones, and the built-in capabilities of the phone (e.g. a complete SIP stack, integrated with the regular phone functionality) is still unmatched. Even Nokia themselves cannot replicate the hardware capabilities of the 808 in a Windows phone, because the OS can't handle them...

    • Except that Android has an integrated SIP stack.

  • oh no!!! (Score:4, Funny)

    by sunking2 (521698) on Thursday January 24, 2013 @04:00PM (#42683789)
    Women love them so much though!!!
  • by whoever57 (658626) on Thursday January 24, 2013 @04:21PM (#42683991) Journal
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I personally love Symbian phones. I love the well designed user interface and the general reliability. I recently looked at Android, iPhones, and decided to get the Nokia 701 Symbian smart phone. To me, a phone is a means to an end, not the end itself. Which is probably why I didn't get an iPhone. The 701 is a thing of beauty, really well designed and loaded with great features. It's like an iPhone but designed in Symbian, and doesn't have that many apps. Still, it's pretty slick.

    I'm not quite ready to say

    • Nokia 701 is a great phone now that they've updated the software. Developing stuff for Symbian was difficult, because Nokia didn't invest into the tools. I think that is actually the whole reason for the downfall.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    None of the current smartphone operating systems seem to fill the feature phone nitch. Apps for Android generally expect a strong processor, accelerometer, gps, and camera. While these features are useful, not everyone needs them, while things like email are necessary.

    What is needed is an operating system that will receive updates for feature phones. A lot of Android devices are left with Android 2.1-3 because they cannot support the new features of modern versions. There needs to be a mobile OS that will r

    • What would a feature phone need updates for? It's not like they'd run any sort of arbitrary code, so security updates would be relatively unnecessary. And in case of a real update-emergency, you can always just flash the firmware via cable.

  • Good riddance!

  • I hope people will switch to 4G as soon as possible, so that 3G will be freed up for me, so I can enjoy my E7-00 untill it dies.

    If Nokia doesn't have the best HTMLv5 experience and Whatsapp (or whatever will be required by then), awesome battery life, offline maps, full qwerty keyboard, kickass camera and all the other superb features of my current phone (that excludes the camera), I will not buy a Nokia device, ever again, unless Nokia ships a full featured Linux phone.

    I hope the Nokia board realizes that

  • Nokia to Omit Dividend for First Time in 143 Years [businessweek.com]

    When you sleep with Ballmer, don't be astonished to wake up with crabs...

  • The last vestiges of Psion's flagship OS have now died. It's a real pity that they let their slimline, yet feature-complete EPOC 5 be taken over in effect by Nokia. Nokia inherited an OS with cut-n-paste, OLE-style object embedding, fully-draggable windows long before those things appeared elsewhere - and it could do all that (and surf the Web too) on a 36MHz ARM processor. They proceeded to gut the OS over the course of a decade and then ham-fistedly shovel layer upon layer of bloat onto it, effectively el

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