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Blackberry Cellphones Operating Systems

BlackBerry 10 Preview Looks Positive 122

Posted by Soulskill
from the better-hope-so dept.
An anonymous reader writes "The Register has a BlackBerry 10 preview up. They say, 'BlackBerry users have a love-hate relationship with their phones. The devices were often forced upon users rather than chosen. At the same time, the handhelds were the most usable and useful communications gadgets you could put in your pocket.' The preview is surprisingly positive, and it goes on to look at BB10's Hub/notifications feature, which they call 'utilitarian' and efficient compared to Windows Phones, which are more about 'style and novelty' whilst being 'a bit limiting.' BlackBerry's implementation may actually improve the system, rather than detracting from it. With BlackBerry providing a QT environment (compatible with Sailfish, which we discussed earlier) and RIM having managed to maintain BB's 3rd place in the mobile OS market, there may a chance for real three-way competition between QT, Android and iOS in the mobile market."
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BlackBerry 10 Preview Looks Positive

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  • by fatalGlory (1060870) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @05:27PM (#42083435) Homepage
    Qt is a great platform/API, would love to see a Qt based platform in the smartphone market with some significant market-share. I feel Qt (qnd QtQuick) deserves more usage in the commercial space than it gets.
  • 3rd place? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Dahamma (304068) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @05:51PM (#42083567)

    Hah. 3rd place in the mobile OS market is kind of like 3rd place in the Superbowl. They don't even get to show up for the game.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Hah. 3rd place in the mobile OS market is kind of like 3rd place in the Superbowl. They don't even get to show up for the game.

      There's lots to back that up; the mobile market is a scale game and without the large number of customers on a platform it just isn't worth investing in new development. However, the mobile market doesn't quite work like a normal consumer market. The buyers in most countries are the big operators - not the end users - and they are willing to put extra subsidies into a third platform just in order to get more competition in future. Look at how desperately AT&T has been keeping Windows Phone on life s

  • ... or die trying.

  • Too bad they can't say the same thing about their earnings forecasts. =P
  • ...is this the version that wipes out compatibility with their entire app library, requiring developers to start from scratch if they want to support the new platform?

    • Probably. On the other hand developers could tweak their 10 year old Symbian apps to work on it.

      Blackberry was like android in that it used a smartphone centric java implementation. It would have been nice if they'd made it just a compile away for android apps, but QT development is pretty straight forward. The fact it's a superset of c++ means many people can already code for it easily enough.

    • by mrops (927562)

      That is the one, and its a good thing.

    • by Rabenblut (580307)

      Yup. They intended to include legacy support but gave up, not really giving a reason...

  • Qt not QT (Score:2, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward

    QT == QuickTime
    Qt == GUI library + other stuff

  • by whoever57 (658626) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @06:31PM (#42083751) Journal
    This review is from the same person who called Windows Phone 8 " a strong contender" [theregister.co.uk] and frequently refers to "freetards" [andreworlowski.com]
    • The register's journalistic integrity is quite low. That said, some of his complaints against freetards are valid. People who think they deserve everything for the price of their broadband connection aren't people anyone should pay attention to.
  • by EmperorOfCanada (1332175) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @07:29PM (#42083997)
    RIM is so much fun to rip on because of the MBA/Scumbag lawyer types who have their BBs clipped onto their belts. But long ago BB was the first phone that caught my attention (around 2000). It had a sort of 486 processor in it and a fairly easy to use SDK. But I couldn't find a way to market the applications. So I ignored them for the last dozen years.

    But here they are potentially using QT (and thus C++) which is my favorite development base. So there might be hope. I want to see how easy it is to use, deploy, and sell. Next I have doubts about the typical baby boomer being able to use this phone. In the demo there are swipes/side swipes/twisty swipes/and swipes with a half twist of lemon; so I fear that the boomer crowd might be a bit lost.

    Lastly the keyboard might free up room for the screen but my daughter has the option of almost any phone she wants and she and her friends all have BB phones for their keyboards and BBMs. My other daughter doesn't text as much and only wants iPhones.

    So what I hope that comes from this is that there is a push to get QT not only onto the BB but to expand it to the Android NDK as well as iOS. This might not sound like the best idea for RIM but they would then get developers like me primarily developing for iOS using QT but then porting to the others in short order. I look at my Objective-C code and dread porting all those square brackets to Java or C++. But just noodling the GUI and a bit of fiddling to port stuff would be great.
    • by Nethead (1563)

      That boomer crowd you think my get lost with a few odd swipes was the same crowd that coded in machine language and flipped toggle switches to load memory. I don't think a toy interface is going to throw us.

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward

        ...and what percentage of the boomer crowd coded in machine language and flipped toggle switches?

  • The problem with BlackBerry in recent years is that there's been no real convincing reason to use it rather than Android/iOS/Windows Phone. Unless you belong to a company tied into the BlackBerry environment, why would you really choose a BlackBerry?
  • by gelfling (6534) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @08:25PM (#42084245) Homepage Journal

    BB isn't in the top 5 in unit sales anymore, or if it is, it's barely hanging on to 5 place. And HTC is 3rd place with barely 4.2% and it's almost entirely piggybacking on Android.

    There are two phone companies now: Samsung + Android, and Apple iOS. And everyone else is or will soon be irrelevant.

    Sony, Panasonic, Sanyo, Nokia, Motorola, Blackberry, ZTE (in the US at any rate) are all going to the Le Brea Tarpits.

    And if MS doesn't pull the plug on Win 8 Phone in 20 months it will be because Balmer has lost what's left of his mind.

  • BB10 Demo by RIM CEO (Score:4, Interesting)

    by aNonnyMouseCowered (2693969) on Saturday November 24, 2012 @10:46PM (#42084789)

    BBC has a video interview with the RIM CEO which shows him demo-ing the BB10 UI. The UI is more elegant than visually in-your-face striking like WinPhone 8.

    The UI kind of reminds me of the Opera/Chrome, and now Firefox too, Start Page with thumbnail previews of your favorite or most recently used apps.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-20087221 [bbc.co.uk]

    • The split screen view reminds me of the Amiga. Its far from being a new concept, but why didn't anyone think of implementing it on a smartphone until now?
    • by Pulzar (81031)

      "The application grid is a paradigm that was introduced five years ago, and we have completely changed that", he says, as he opens up the application grid.

      Then he proceeds to show us the revolutionary multi-tasking interface, which is in a 2x2 grid.

      I hope they plan to have some better demos soon.

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