Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Android Cellphones Operating Systems

CyanogenMod 9 Achieves Stable Release 75

Posted by Soulskill
from the less-filling-tastes-great dept.
New submitter jolle sends word that stable builds for CyanogenMod 9 rolled out to their servers last night, supporting a wide range of devices. Downloads here. From their announcement: "[This] release is for the majority of our ICS supported devices, the stragglers will catch up, and we will leave the door open for merging in additional devices from maintainers, external and internal. The team itself, will focus solely on Jelly Bean and maintenance of the CM 7 codebase. Many have wondered why we bothered to finish CM 9 when we are already active in CM 10 development. To that, our answer is: we don't like to leave things incomplete. There is no profit gained from what we do, so the satisfaction of completing a goal is our only reward. This release also serves as a release suitable for the masses, especially those who won't have 100% functioning releases of CM 10 immediately or are averse to anything branded as 'preview', 'alpha', 'beta' or 'nightly.'"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

CyanogenMod 9 Achieves Stable Release

Comments Filter:
  • AOKP Is Better (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ilikenwf (1139495) on Friday August 10, 2012 @06:36PM (#40952439)
    AOKP tends to be more polished/slick it seems. I realize there's Liquid, etc, but I've tried several roms including CM on my touchpad, Droid2, and VZW Nexus, and I always come back to AOKP.

    AOKP [aokp.co]
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Having more choices is always better than anything else - and infinitely better than shiny toys.

      Instead of starting a pissing contest, why not enjoy the choices you have?

    • by Roujo (2577771)
      AOKP is based (at least in part) on the CM code. They'd be doing something wrong if the end product was worse. =P
  • I don't see Nook in the list. Although their site says other devices may come later.

    Anyone else see something specific about the Nook?

    • by SScorpio (595836)

      The Nook doesn't have any experimental or nightly builds of CM9. Thus it's not support. Not all devices that are support by CM7 are being supported by CM9.

      • if you mean nook color (NC) then it does work with cm9. not great (tried it a few weeks ago, was unusable) but maybe its going to be worth going to soon.

        cm7 is great but the preview of cm9 was better. but it HAS to be as stable as cm7 is on the NC before I'll spend any more time on it.

        • There's never going to be a stable cm9 for Nook Color. cm10 is already more stable than cm9 on it, so that's where all the developers went. As far as I know they've thrown code over the wall but nobody has built zips yet.

          There's supposedly a debian vm you can get with most of the bits installed to build it. Why nobody's done that and then synced the resultant images to an FTP site, I'm not clear on (so there must be more to it than that, right?)

          Anyway, use cm7 or self-build cm10 now for Nook Color.

          • Yep, some devices on CM 7.2 will skip ICS and go directly to Jelly Bean. e.g. my phone, a moto defy, has CM10 nightlies. RAM consumption and wifi connection are flakey, so I'll stick with Gingerbread stable for the time being.

            Whether the CM10 release is finished on such devices before Google release the next shiny code drop is an open question.

            • Whether the CM10 release is finished on such devices before Google release the next shiny code drop is an open question.

              Indeed! I think in the case of my device, the issue is more that Jelly Bean has a 3.x kernel with the OMAP support it needs, vs. a bunch of stuff that was backported to 2.6.32 and attempts to forward port that to 3.0 were not entirely successful by the community.

      • by nurb432 (527695)

        Odd, my NT is running non-release CM9. It has been for a couple of weeks now at least.

        Unless he meant the NC, then i cant say anything intelligent as i don't have one so never cared to look into it.

        Or perhaps the NST... 'nook' is a family of devices..

  • Thank you! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rastoboy29 (807168) on Friday August 10, 2012 @07:35PM (#40953021) Homepage
    Thank you Cyanogenmod guys for making our phones not suck.

    Seriously, I really appreciate it.
  • by Eil (82413) on Friday August 10, 2012 @07:37PM (#40953031) Homepage Journal

    Seeing as Android is open source, are there any x86 ports of CyanogenMod? Even for just running in a VM like VirtualBox? Seems like having such a thing would at least increase user/developer interest.

    I know there have been some x86 ports of Android, but those have either been for very specific hardware (e.g., a certain model of netbook) or poorly maintained.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Android/CM9 will always be hardware dependent. Hence the list of devices. CM developers/geeks/nerds pick their favorite devices and make CM9 work on them. CM does not automatically just work on all/every android device - due to difference in hardware/drivers/locked-unlocked bootloader etc.

      So, it's natural x86 ports will again be hardware specific.

      It's not magic bullet (but it's close).

      • by ilikenwf (1139495)
        ...although, porting isn't that difficult if the device specific stuff is out there for the version of android the build is based on. That said, I'm pretty sure x86 is one of the build targets, in a qemu image.

        I think you'll be able to google and find premade VM's of x86 android. It does exist, and I'm not sure but I think it does for CM as well.
    • If all you want to do is play around with a vm running android just download the official android sdk.
      This contains vm's to run android and is released ahead of the source code and any devices hitting the market.

    • by gl4ss (559668)

      http://www.android-x86.org/releases/releasenote-4-0-rc2 [android-x86.org]

      says that they don't have ethernet for 4.0.. that's kinda bad. you could run the sdk emulators though, but they suck big time in performance..

  • Cyanogenmod is great. But they have turned there back on the phones that started it all. A lot of phones have version 9 but they are totally unsupported versions. Its to bad because its a great ROM. It also looks like they sold out to Samsung. They seem to support even samsungs older phones which are worse off then some of there unsupported phones!
    • It's open source so you can still help add support to the phones that are currently supported and contribute back no?
    • by jrumney (197329)

      It also looks like they sold out to Samsung. They seem to support even samsungs older phones which are worse off then some of there unsupported phones!

      Samsung gives good support to third party developers, so their phones are well supported in return. Rather than blaming the Cyanogenmod developers for your device manufacturer's lack of support, and tossing out accusations of "sell-out", perhaps you would be better directing your anger at the device manufacturer that does not release specs or full source for

      • by Grishnakh (216268) on Friday August 10, 2012 @10:04PM (#40954041)

        I can't speak to Samsung specifically, but one of the problems with Android, compared to regular Linux (and this is also true for many embedded versions of ARM Linux), is that a lot of the device drivers are not open-sourced. And a lot of the others may be open-source, but haven't been merged into the mainline kernel, so they only work with specific kernel versions. So if a phone maker doesn't release their drivers as open-source, then porting a different CM/Android version to their phone may be impossible or extremely difficult.

      • Sure; except none of us actually know what our manufacturers are doing. Some of the "supported" phones seem to have been completely hacked together in the face of total resistance from the manufacturer whilst other phones (HTC??) seem to have co-operative manufacturers but just bad luck. If the someone from Cyanogenmod side would tell us which manufacturers were co-operating and helpful, even better if broken down by individual phone, then we would be able to write off and complain to the manufactures th
        • by Calos (2281322)

          Easy, buy from the Nexus line :)

          Otherwise, Googling can tell you, but it can be painful. However note that Samsung did hire Cyanogen himself.

      • Yep. My Gnex is easy as hell to unlock

        Start phone in recovery, then open cmd and type "fastboot oem unlock".
    • by samoanbiscuit (1273176) on Saturday August 11, 2012 @01:24AM (#40954957)
      They didn't sell out to Samsung. Samsung rather, has reached out to them repeatedly, in order that it's phones run CM well. They even hired the lead dev last I heard. Why don't you ask your phone manufacturer to provide free devices and hire devs the way Samsung does?
    • The Samscum Galaxy S aka Vibrant will not be getting support anytime soon as CM team never figured out how to get 911 working and samscum only supplies a binary blob driver. Samscum abandoned it when they decided it was too 'decrepit' to accept ICS when all they had to do was provide ICS without their crappy interface(s) like swype and the crapware they load on..

      • Samscum? Really?...
      • ... all they had to do was provide ICS without their crappy interface(s) like swype and the crapware they load on..

        I've got a Samsung Epic - the Galaxy S with a slide-out keyboard. I'll agree with you about the bundled crapware and their Touchwiz interface, (or whatever it's called). But Swype is simply awesome.

        Currently running ICS, and one of the first things I did after flashing was install Swype.

        • by mrmeval (662166)

          The major problem with anything over 2.2 is 911 calling which is sporadic at best. If there were open hardware specs on the radio or S* would at least compile the driver for some flavor of ICS it would fix that issue.

  • Well here's my impression, it's alright.

    Here's what annoys me - Lock screen: Old CM7 had the 'ok' button in the bottom left corner, now it is in the right, screws up my muscle memory. I end up typing in my lock screen PIN and hitting 0 instead of OK, very annoying.
    The same thing goes with the 'accept' call slider, before you had to move the slider to the left to accept a call, now you have to slide it to the right. Can't tell how many times I've accidentally hung up on someone calling me because I reflexive

    • by brentrad (1013501)
      Those are all changes that Google implemented in ICS. My stock Galaxy Nexus behaves just like that. And yes, there's a lot of blue. :) Once I got used to it, I quite like it myself!
  • It's "ok." It's still not stable, but it's a good effort. I'll try it again in a few weeks, but the current build still crashes on my HTC.

  • Okay, I want to buy a device for CyanogenMod. I don't want the hassle of jailbreaking and I want to know for sure that it will keep working even if I try an upgraded manufacturer's ROM. The official supported device list [cyanogenmod.com] doesn't say anything. The install instructions all start with "now root your phone". How can I find out a list of recommended phones including information about how easy the install is?
    • by cduffy (652)

      Okay, I want to buy a device for CyanogenMod. I don't want the hassle of jailbreaking and I want to know for sure that it will keep working even if I try an upgraded manufacturer's ROM.

      Buy a Nexus-series device from Google. "Jailbreaking" those is a matter of running an official, vendor-supported tool (which tells you that you're voiding all vendor support on the software stack) -- however, they also can be reverted back to stock vendor ROMs, which Google has for download.

    • If you want to run anything other than the stock ROM, you're going to need to root the phone. Even a developer oriented phone such as the Galaxy Nexus requires that you root/unlock the boot loader to flash a new ROM. If you're in IT, you've probably been able to follow directions to some extent; there are a plethora of them online. I'd say the easiest phone to unlock/root is the Galaxy Nexus since it is a developer phone and isn't heavily locked down like some (*cough*Motorola*cough*) are.

      CM and AOKP
      • If you want to run anything other than the stock ROM, you're going to need to root the phone. Even a developer oriented phone such as the Galaxy Nexus requires that you root/unlock the boot loader to flash a new ROM.

        Thanks for your comments. Based on this and other comments I will probably go for a Nexus 7 and put CM10 on it. I have no problem "rooting" the phone by an officially supported mechanism such as a bootloader. What I don't want to know about is using a security flaw to root things. That's something that can a) just go away at any time and b) is illegal in some places. If I got the phone for free I might consider that, but I'm never going to give money to someone who's forcing me to break the law.

  • I'm surprised Nexus 7 isn't supported [cyanogenmod.com]. There are tables, but only the Advent Vega, Nook Color and HP Touchpad.

  • I'm likely going to be switching from T-Mobile to US Cellular (due to coverage issues where I live now), and am seriously disappointed to see that their phones are all apparently unsupported (except for one discontinued older model, the "Samsung Mesmerize"). The CDMA versions of the Galaxy S II and S III seem to be excluded.

    Anybody know if any of US Cellular's phones are likely to see support any time soon? After years of happy Cyanogenmod at T-Mobile I'd really hate to be stuck with a manufacturer "skin"

Forty two.

Working...