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Nokia Lumia 900 Reviews 195

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the n950-was-way-cooler dept.
MrSeb, zachareye, and others wrote in with several reviews of the Nokia Lumia 900. Starting things off, Extreme Tech asks if the Lumia redefines the smartphone; BGR chimes in declaring the phone "terrific". Ars Technica, on the other hand, isn't quite so enthusiastic, especially about the camera optics. Anandtech joins Ars in not being particularly enthused. It looks like most reviewers are happy with the UI, but not so enthused about the hardware (low display resolution for one). Signs point to an OK handset, but nothing spectacular.
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Nokia Lumia 900 Reviews

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  • Duh (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward

    So they come up with a device that doesn't meet the hype they're pushing it with which will drive down Nokia's share price making them easier for Microsoft to one day acquire. It's gonna happen, they'll sell off all the parts except the patent portfolio and the Brand.

    • Re:Duh (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Penguinisto (415985) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @10:51AM (#39572367) Journal

      You expected any other reason for ex-Microsoftie Stephen Elop to suddenly show up as CEO of Nokia?

      Not sure what Microsoft would do with it beyond the patent portfolio, though. the brand is a perishable item, and by the time the company well and truly dies, it may well have about the same reputation as the AOL or Tandy brand. :/

      As for the patents, I'm not really sure what they expect to get from those, other than income off the Android OEMs.

    • Re:Duh (Score:5, Insightful)

      by poetmatt (793785) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @10:55AM (#39572429) Journal

      Look. They're late to the game, they're trying to mimic the apple hype and simultaneously deliver while not putting enough effort into making a competitive device to actually deliver. They're praying that being able to be around long enough off android revenue (before B&N/antitrust cut that to zero) will be enough for people to consider it a competitive device.

      Microsoft is just following standard protocol with Nokia. What makes you think the business model has *ever* changed? Why? Well look no further than:

      Embrace, Extend, Extinguish. where are we at with Nokia again? What always comes first?

      • The ITC rejected [arstechnica.com] B&N's antitrust complainst against Microsoft.
      • by exomondo (1725132)

        Microsoft is just following standard protocol with Nokia. What makes you think the business model has *ever* changed? Why? Well look no further than:

        Embrace, Extend, Extinguish. where are we at with Nokia again? What always comes first?

        You think they're trying to embrace, extend and extinguish Nokia? What would be the point of that?

    • Re:Duh (Score:5, Informative)

      by Sir_Sri (199544) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:08AM (#39572591)

      Actually if you look, the summary is wrong, it's only the ars review of the ones listed that doesn't have a generally very positive set of things to say about the phone, and the ars review is comparing it to a galaxy nexus and iphone 4s (which are 200 dollars more expensive, but much better hardware phones).

      They're building up hype because they've made a pretty good mid range product, whether or not it gets any traction with consumers or AT&T retail monkeys (who then convince consumers to buy it ) who knows. They're not aiming for the 600 dollar phone market, stupidly, there should be a flagship device positioned there. But for what it is price wise, it's pretty good overall.

      • Re:Duh (Score:5, Insightful)

        by tripleevenfall (1990004) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @12:59PM (#39574135)

        Nokia's problem with all their Windows phones (and MSFT's problem with Windows Phone in general) is that they can't get retailers to push the phones.

        Nobody comes into a store wanting to look at a Windows phone, so immediately the hurdle is that you've got to change their minds about what they want. Some articles posted here have even said that salespeople are not willing to push it because the return rate on Windows Phones had been high, and they lose their time for zero commission, when they could be across the room selling someone an iPhone and being safe with their commission.

        • by Sir_Sri (199544)

          Right, which is why they have the retail arrangement with AT&T, all the floor staff were given windows 7 phones, in the hopes that would encourage their enthusiasm.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward
      What seems funny is that when Intel came up with a cellphone prototype with better performance, everyone came asking for battery life. Now Nokia came with product that apparently has a great battery life, and nobody seems to care.

      So I ask, where are the battery life comparison/benchmarks from these sites that don't seem to be "enthusiastic" about the phone's performance?
  • by MoronGames (632186) <cam.henlin@gma[ ]com ['il.' in gap]> on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @10:48AM (#39572327) Journal
    We need more competition in the mobile phone market. BlackBerry is pretty much dead, WebOS is dead, Symbian is dead. It would be really nice to see Microsoft grab a significant portion of the market away from Android, which will push Google into making their OS better.
    • by Zouden (232738) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:04AM (#39572519)

      I would think Google are trying their hardest to improve Android to compete with iOS. Another smartphone maker doesn't really change that does it?

    • by Kenja (541830) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:07AM (#39572577)
      The problem is that Microsoft seems to have no idea why people should use their phones. Apple claims better screen, face time, etc. Google claims open system, low cost app development and a wide range of hardware options. Microsoft claims you can get to the camera app real fast. Its just not a convincing argument.
      • by cornjones (33009) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:21AM (#39572729) Homepage

        Microsoft claims you can get to the camera app real fast.

        Its just not a convincing argument.

        The new crop of android phones are android phones are in a serious pissing match over this very stat. I will say that i will be weighing this in my decision. my phone is my primary camera and I have missed several camera worthy moment by phone lag of getting to the camera (yes I have set the camera to be able to launch from lock )

        • by tlhIngan (30335)

          The new crop of android phones are android phones are in a serious pissing match over this very stat. I will say that i will be weighing this in my decision. my phone is my primary camera and I have missed several camera worthy moment by phone lag of getting to the camera (yes I have set the camera to be able to launch from lock )

          Hell, the iPhone is also in on it, back when Jobs was alive it was something he remarked upon in iOS - getting to the camera and snapping a photo was to be much quicker. (Leading t

          • by exomondo (1725132)

            Hell, the iPhone is also in on it

            In fact the iphone unlock to camera copied the way windows phone unlocks (slide the lock screen out of the way), they even copied the 'hint' about how to do it (hit the camera icon and the lockscreen 'bumps' up and down a bit to indicate that you need to slide it up).

      • by caywen (942955)

        It was for me. The dedicated camera button is actually very useful. As I'm taking my phone out of my pocket, it's easy to hold the camera button down and have it ready to take pictures by the time it comes out. That's actually a fair bit faster than turning on and pressing a button on the lock screen. I've used both, and the camera button is simply better.

      • by Artraze (600366) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @12:15PM (#39573433)

        I rather disagree.

        Apple phones pretty much define the high end, and so even if they're very shiny you have to pay for that. Also, they lock you into the Apple experience, which isn't necessarily the best one.

        Android is an open system, with low cost phones available, but at the same time it's plagued by bloatware and inconsistent user experience. Honestly, I don't know how people put up with it... Well, without installing Cyanogenmod like I did. I know someone with a Galaxy S II (IIRC) and the thing has ~30 apps on it that cannot be uninstalled (and are useless, of course). They'll always be there, with permissions you didn't approve, potentially running in the background wasting your resources and causing problems. (On that note, I know a different someone who's phone is actually rendered unstable due to a preinstalled app.) Sure, you can kind of hide them, but they'll be there when you look through the app drawer or add a shortcut or do a general action (e.g. "Share photo" via Picasa, Facebook, Twitter, arg where's MMS?)

        If Microsoft can actually deliver a streamlined no-nonsense interface and solidly hit the midrange price point I think they'll find buyers. It's true that people don't care _that_ much, but at the same time I think there's a lot of frustration building up over Apple's walled garden and Android's bloatware/platform issues. They may not be all 'wow I can shave 100ms of my time-to-pic', but when they go to buy their next phone they'll remember Microsoft advertising a snappy simple interface and their problems with their old phone and be willing to give it a try.

        • by 21mhz (443080)

          If Microsoft can actually deliver a streamlined no-nonsense interface and solidly hit the midrange price point I think they'll find buyers. It's true that people don't care _that_ much, but at the same time I think there's a lot of frustration building up over Apple's walled garden and Android's bloatware/platform issues. They may not be all 'wow I can shave 100ms of my time-to-pic', but when they go to buy their next phone they'll remember Microsoft advertising a snappy simple interface and their problems with their old phone and be willing to give it a try.

          This. It's pretty much a phone for grown-ups who don't go "ooh, it has four cores, imagine a Beowulf cluster of these", but who choose a device that is usable for their daily needs, and is perhaps good enough for their casual needs.

        • If Microsoft can actually deliver a streamlined no-nonsense interface and solidly hit the midrange price point I think they'll find buyers.

          And there is a good size of the market to be had in this space. I've had a iPhone and gave up on it, now have SGS2 and like it a lot, but still get a bit frustrated with unpolished nature of it (ie pretty much like Linux in general). I want a phone that has a solid user interface, but still a little bit of flexibility with hardware and what I'm allowed to do with it. It's just like the PC battle all over again. Apple are too locked in, Linux/Android too loose and fragmented, MS can come in with the closest

    • by Relayman (1068986)
      BlackBerry needs to drop hardware and develop an app that runs on any phone. Good luck getting that through their thick skulls!
      • by cornjones (33009)

        seconded... but part of their value prop is that they give strong security to corp IT. if this was just an app on another os, they may not be able to engender the same level of trust. (yes they could just encrypt the damn contents and offer short term keys over the network)

        the other problem bb has is that they had a long time to 'perfect' their phones. before the smart phone explosion, bb came out w/ a new phone every 9 mths or so that was a bit better than the last. with no competition they had time to

  • From experience: "good"/"great" even "better than the competition" is not enough.

    It must be better by a huge margin (or have a "killer app") for the phone to be adopted at this late of a stage. Android had the edge of being "free", so it was "easy" to ship with. I am curious how successful the platform will be (and will be watching from the sidelines), but at this point I do not think it will change the mobile market.

    • by ItsIllak (95786)

      It's killer app is fully integrated contacts and social media. It's a hard one to understand though it's great when you've set it up and use it.

  • The brand new Lumia 900 comes out somewhat comparable to the two year old iPhone 4.

    Pass.

    • ...well, when you consider that it's about the same price as the two year old iPhone 4 ($99 w/a 2 year contract), it's not so bad.

  • by ItsIllak (95786) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @10:55AM (#39572419) Homepage

    First.

    The iPhone revolutionised the mobile phone market, essentially turning smartphones that had limited use and poor experience into things that are quick and reliable. Now we're tweaking and improving, it's hard for anyone to carve a niche. WP7's niche is that it totally integrates your contacts. If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are. That's it's killer app. The problem is that it takes more than a one-day test to really see this benefit so reviews are never going to "get it".

    Second.

    MS are keen not to make the mistake Android is making (or that they made in the PCmarket). They want to standardise the platform. This is easy for Apple/iPhone, they're the only ones making one. Not so easy keeping HTC, Samsung, Nokia and others to stick to one design. There's nothing for them to distinguish themselves in the market.

    Roll on Windows 8 and tablets - then iPhone will be under serious threat. For most consumers, the tablet - if properly conceived and integrated - is a far better computer experience than the PC/Laptop.

    (disclosure: I'm a devoted Lumia 800 and previously Samsung Omnia 7 owner)

    • by Nursie (632944) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:11AM (#39572631)

      If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are.

      My N900 has been doing that for some time now, as well as integrating skype messages and calls into the normal call and SMS systems.

      You mean other phones can't/don't do this?

      • If Android can do that, why the hell can't we do that on a desktop?!?
      • by randallman (605329) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @12:25PM (#39573593)

        Ditto. Another N900 owner here. I'm amazed when new phones don't do this when my relatively old N900 has always had really good contact account integration. Also, Skype and SIP are well integrated into the phone app and all messaging including SMS is integrated. Without looking at an indicator icon, you may not know whether you're using SMS or an IM protocol. Or you may now know if you're receiving a cell call or a Skype call.

        It's funny that MS is advertising features from the platform they're trying to kill.

    • by Daetrin (576516)

      WP7's niche is that it totally integrates your contacts. If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are. That's it's killer app. The problem is that it takes more than a one-day test to really see this benefit so reviews are never going to "get it"."

      I'm trying to figure out what the advantage of this is. I already have a tool that integrates multiple modes of communication into one one view of a person, it's called my brain. I know that the joe375@hotmail that i email with is the same WittyNickname that i have on my twitter feed and the same as the OlderNickname that i have in my LJ friends. How does Microsoft "seamlessly integrating" them make things better?

      Although perhaps the fact that i have two distinct twitter accounts and two LJ accounts and

      • by exomondo (1725132)

        I'm trying to figure out what the advantage of this is. I already have a tool that integrates multiple modes of communication into one one view of a person, it's called my brain.

        Why even bother with a phonebook? Just use your brain to remember the phone number and associate a name with it.

        • by Daetrin (576516)
          Seriously? You're either a troll or some kind of mental freak. I'm someone who's very bad with names. I often have to get introduced to someone three or four times before their name starts to stick. But even so i have learned probably well over a thousand names for well over a hundred different people. First names, last names, occasionally middle names, nicknames, email names, LJ names, twitter names, etc. I currently have exactly two phone numbers memorized. My current phone number, and the phone number of
          • by exomondo (1725132)

            Seriously?

            No, obviously (well i suppose not obvious enough to you) not.

            But even so i have learned probably well over a thousand names for well over a hundred different people. First names, last names, occasionally middle names, nicknames, email names, LJ names, twitter names, etc.

            And it's far far easier to just remember their name and have every other contact method associated with that - heard of a rolodex? - hence the reason just about every phone does this and has done for many many years.

    • by c.r.o.c.o (123083) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:52AM (#39573115)

      The iPhone revolutionised the mobile phone market, essentially turning smartphones that had limited use and poor experience into things that are quick and reliable. Now we're tweaking and improving, it's hard for anyone to carve a niche. WP7's niche is that it totally integrates your contacts. If you know the same person in twitter, linkedin, your email db, facebook and more, WP7 seamlessly integrates them into the one person they are. That's it's killer app. The problem is that it takes more than a one-day test to really see this benefit so reviews are never going to "get it".

      The Nokia N9 and the Nokia N900 had this integration feature for years. It's nice to have, but it was not and will never be a killer app. Otherwise you'd see the Maemo/Meego being the third ecosystem as MS likes to brand itself.

      There are no killer apps anymore. Apple has amazing, yet closed hardware that is closely tied into their App Store with millions of apps and into iTunes with millions of songs and movies. So they appeal to fashionistas and people who just want something that works even if overpriced.

      Google has shitty or amazing, but open hardware that is tied into their Google Play with hundreds of thousands of apps, and is an open development platform where anyone can cook a ROM, tweak it, etc. So they appeal to poor people, regular people, geeks and everybody else. At the same time Google Play seems to be making a run for iTunes.

      What does MS bring to the table? They have sub par, closed hardware (sorry, but the beautiful design of the Lumia 900 does not compensate for the crappy specs), and they have few apps. Given the fiascos that were every single MS foray into digital media distribution, an iTunes style store is pretty much dead in the water.

      Maybe future revisions of Windows Mobile will address some of the issues. But do you think Apple, Google and even RIM are sitting around twiddling thumbs? How long did it take MS to implement copypasta? Nokia learned this lesson the hard way. Maemo 5 on the N900 was MILES ahead of Android or iOS. But they sat on it for a couple of years, and by the time Maemo 6 came out, it was outdated. I should know this, because I have both Maemo 6 and ICS in front of me.

      MS are keen not to make the mistake Android is making (or that they made in the PCmarket). They want to standardise the platform. This is easy for Apple/iPhone, they're the only ones making one. Not so easy keeping HTC, Samsung, Nokia and others to stick to one design. There's nothing for them to distinguish themselves in the market.

      This approach only ever worked for Apple, since they are a vertically integrated company. They differentiate based on hardware specs, design and OS all at once. But if you take away the OS and hardware specs as you propose with a standard Windows platform, that means design is the only thing left. Samsung, Nokia, HTC, LG, etc will become little more than custom case designers.

      Nokia took the bait, but it will be a cold day in hell before Samsung drops even their struggling Bada platform in favour of Windows.

      Really, tell me how will the hardware manufacturers differentiate themselves when they ALL have to have the exact same OS and hardware specs, and they ALL have access to the same apps, etc.

      Roll on Windows 8 and tablets - then iPhone will be under serious threat. For most consumers, the tablet - if properly conceived and integrated - is a far better computer experience than the PC/Laptop.

      Define properly conceived and integrated. That's such a platitude, I have a feeling you threw it in there because you were itching to click Submit. Tablets DEFINITELY have a place, but it's a niche. I tried iOS, Android and Windows 7 slate PCs. Yes, the most useful by far was the Samsung Series 7. But you know what? Even though it was a full fledged PC, with decent touch input, it was still limited. No keyboard meant I had to bring an external one.

      • by ItsIllak (95786)

        The Nokia N9 and the Nokia N900 had this integration feature for years. It's nice to have, but it was not and will never be a killer app.

        There are no killer apps anymore

        I know next to nothing about the N900 but killer apps need an ecosystem in which to exist. You can't just have one thing right and miss out on the other important stuff. Metro is an innovative UI that works really well. The marketplace has 50,000 apps. Who cares how many cores it has, the UI is responsive, properly written apps are fast

    • by horza (87255)

      There is a lot of rewriting history here. There were plenty of quick and reliable phones before the iPhone, which is no quicker or more reliable than any of its predecessors. The way it revolutionised the mobile phone market was to turn something as mundane as a phone into an expensive must-have fashion icon. The only original feature was the "Visual Voicemail". The contact integration (email/fb/phone/etc) is not some new killer app of WP7, Blackberry has been doing it for years.

      MS is similar to Android in

      • by sootman (158191) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @01:57PM (#39574945) Homepage Journal

        If he's rewriting history, you're completely forgetting it. The killer app of the iPhone (before it had 3rd-party apps) was it was the FREAKING INTERNET IN YOUR POCKET. (OK, the WWW, technically, plus email.) Did you ever use a WAP browser on an early PDA, or even a more modern browser on an Axim or iPaq? They SUCKED. [slashdot.org] Horribly. And they depended on WiFi or, if you had a smartphone, on exorbitant data plans. The iPhone came with a really great web browser that showed real pages--just shrunken, but easily panned and zoomed--at a reasonable cost. PLUS it had a built-in iPod AND a great video player, Maps like had never been seen before on a mobile device, and plenty of other good things.

        • And you are rewriting history as well.
          Opera Mobile was a decent browser on Windows Mobile. It worked well on my XDA2 and even better on my Universal. There were much better navigation application than iPhone had for a long time (in fact, most big brand navigation software started on Windows CE/Mobile). And iPhone had a low resolution screen and wasn't able to run third party applications for a long while. It was a fashion toy compared to Windows Mobile back then, admittedly got better later.

          • by ItsIllak (95786)

            Opera on WM 6.5 was truly legendary. Though generally Safari on iOS equalled it, but on far far better hardware.

        • by knarf (34928)

          Well, no, I guess you really like your iPhone but that does not mean it was 'the phone to put the FREAKING INTERNET IN YOUR POCKET' (why shout, btw?). There were many phones which did this before Apple got into the game of selling phones. Many operating systems, as well, with many applications. Some were mediocre (Windows Mobile, I'm looking at you), some were good (Maemo comes to mind). Given the hardware they ran on, some of them actually performed quite well as mobile web platforms. Even the aging HTC Pr [wikipedia.org]

      • by ItsIllak (95786)

        The killer app of the iPhone was capacitive touchscreen. You know, one that actually responded when you touched it, and for that matter, didn't when you didn't...?

        To go with it, an OS that prioritised user input. That was novel.

        iPhone is not, and has never been about all about being a "fashion icon". Sure, it's pretty, but that's just one of it's features.

    • For most consumers, the tablet - if properly conceived and integrated - is a far better computer experience than the PC/Laptop.

      Disagree 100% Not sure what you mean by "properly conceived and integrated", but the simple fact that you have to hold the tablet with at least one hand, and control it using broad movements with your other hand make it mostly impractical for long term use.

  • New Class? BS! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by whoever57 (658626) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @10:56AM (#39572435) Journal

    Thatâ(TM)s the key point here: The Lumia 900 isnâ(TM)t targeting iPhone or Galaxy users; itâ(TM)s targeting the 41% of the US public who still own a feature phone. If youâ(TM)re already firmly set on getting an iPhone, the Lumia wonâ(TM)t stop you â" but for walk-in customers, the $200 price difference is really quite significant.

    A quick glance on Amazon shows new android phones at less than $300 without a contract. T-Mobile has lots of Android phones available at $0 + plus a contract. Those current feature phone owners will find that more attractive than $450 for the Lumia 900, or about the same as $0 to $99 with a contract. It's not a new class.

  • So, are any of these reviews going to give us any idea, at all, of call or sound quality on these phones? Or have we just completely given up on the "phone" part of the functionality?

    • by jader3rd (2222716)

      So, are any of these reviews going to give us any idea, at all, of call or sound quality on these phones? Or have we just completely given up on the "phone" part of the functionality?

      From what I can tell about reading non proffesional online reviews/comments, all many techincal people care about are the number of cores on the device. Doesn't matter if they're turned on or off, or are even fast. They apparently only buy phones for the cores in them.

    • by Grishnakh (216268) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @01:40PM (#39574729)

      Honestly, when was the last time you tried a phone and found it to have poor sound quality for just talking? You sound like someone who shops for a new car and asks if it's hard to change the points or adjust the carburetor.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @10:59AM (#39572477)

    Nokia's Linux N9 has a front facing camera and an option for 64 (not 16) gigabytes. Plus the swipe keyboard is the bomb. Check out the video, 2nd thumbnail from the left, on the bottom of this page:

    http://swipe.nokia.com/ [nokia.com]

    It is a breeze for me to SSH to it, when I need a real keyboard, like to enter serious passwords, (hopefully rarely).

    Those are the main advantages the Linux N9 has over the Lumia 900, its WP7 polycarbonite twin.

    • by pijokela (462279)

      I bought a 16GB N9 a week ago for 299€ (no strings attached). I just love the thing. I've been learning to build small apps for it and the Qt development environment is just awesome to anything I've seen before. And despite it being the only Meego model and only sold in some markets, the Ovi store pretty much has all the apps I care for... ok, I'd take some more games, but that's not critical.

      It's just sad that something technically so excellent is abandoned completely for strategic business reasons. :

  • by anss123 (985305) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:05AM (#39572539)
    Quick summary:

    It looks okay. Wifi and 3g battery life is poor, but 4g is good. Java script performance is unimpressive. Camera is good, but white balance is poor and a faster CPU would help post processing. There wasn't nothing to complain about on the display. No 5Ghz wifi, but bandwidth and such is good. Speaker quality is good. And that's about it.

    Their biggest complaint seems to be that the phone lacks a dual core CPU. They are apparently coming and will let the phone record video at 1024p, over 720p, and perhaps take better photos.

    Other than that, it's a normal Windows 7.5 phone.
  • First off, I like Windows Phone 7.5. I have an HTC Titan, and it works quite well. I would definitely say it's almost competitive in most aspects, and does exceed in a few important areas. That said, Microsoft's really not doing Nokia many favors. Lumia 900 really needed an updated WP OS. This was a perfect opportunity for Microsoft to release, say, WP7.6, with support for a higher resolution screen, and maybe some much needed UI tweaks and facelifts. Instead, consumers may well walk into AT&T and reali

  • by alexo (9335) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @11:52AM (#39573117) Journal

    Are there any good phones with a real physical 5-row QWERTY slider keyboard anymore?

  • I'm still a cell phone Luddite. I don't like most "smart" functions because of the drain battery power while giving me a ton of stuff I don't want.

    Things I don't want:
    "Seamless integration of phone and social networking contacts" -- I have different spheres of life for a reason. I don't want any corporation being able to draw a perfect picture of my habits, hobbies, peers, or family.

    "Blazing fast web access" -- I don't want to shell out more than I'm paying right now ($50/month) for a cell phone. That means

    • "Seamless integration of phone and social networking contacts" -- I have different spheres of life for a reason. I don't want any corporation being able to draw a perfect picture of my habits, hobbies, peers, or family.

      You misunderstand what "integration" means in this case. Simply put, if you add a Facebook account, your friends from there will appear in your contact list ("People hub"). Which I personally find rather inconvenient, but it doesn't mean that Facebook gets to see your regular phone contact list. And, of course, if you don't add Facebook account at all, it's a non-issue.

      "Blazing fast web access" -- I don't want to shell out more than I'm paying right now ($50/month) for a cell phone. That means I don't want a "data plan". The lack of web access decreases time/money/effort spent on phone development and prevents unexpected accidental charges.

      "Touch screen keyboard" -- Buttons work better. They just do.

      Sounds like you don't want a smartphone, then.

      • by eepok (545733)

        You are correct. I *don't* want a smartphone, but that's the only kind of cell phone receiving genuine development. No one's trying to perfect the simple functions of the feature phone (sound quality, mic quality, media player, camera, keyboard, battery life).

        Instead, the smartphone is receiving 99% of development focus because it can be used to bring in additional revenue beyond normal subscription.

        It's too much of a focus on "more" and not enough on "better".

  • by guidryp (702488) on Wednesday April 04, 2012 @01:17PM (#39574393)

    http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/3/2921472/lumia-900-review [theverge.com]

    It seems reviewers are anxious for a third ecosystem to emerge so the keep making light of the shortcomings. This is ~2010 era HW power, with an OS that was aimed at the original iOS and hasn't caught up to the competition. People need to stop making excuses for the Weak HW, and weak SW. Microsoft/Nokia, need to seriously revamp the OS and release a real flagship if they want to be anything but irrelevant.

    Verge Excerpt(on the software itself):
    Let me just put this bluntly: I think it's time to stop giving Windows Phone a pass. I think it's time to stop talking about how beautifully designed it is, and what a departure it's been for Microsoft, and how hard the company is working to add features. I am very aware of the hard work and dedication Microsoft has put into this platform, but at the end of the day, Windows Phone is just not as competitive with iOS and Android as it should be right now.

    The problems with Windows Phone are myriad, many small. But it's a death by a thousand cuts. And all those little problems were once again immediately apparent to me the moment I started using the Lumia 900.

    The most glaring issues also happen to be some of the oldest issues — things you think at this point would have been dealt with. Scrolling in third party apps, for instance, is still completely erratic. I would blame this on developers, but given that this platform has been around for nearly two years, I think that's a cop out. In new Twitter apps like Carbon, lists of messages will sometimes disappear or skip weirdly when scrolling. I first complained about this in version 1 of Windows Phone, and I thought it had been squashed — it has not.

    Elsewhere there are missteps. Though Microsoft has added some form of multitasking to the OS, there is nearly never a feeling that apps in the "background" are actually still waiting for you. In fact, many apps still deliver a splash screen to you when you reenter them — if this is a developer issue, then I guess most of the hardworking coders on this platform never got the memo. In short, it kind of sucks to use. Where iOS and Android at least feel responsive in packing and unpacking background apps, Windows Phone often comes across as broken and limp. ....

    • by ruemere (1148095)

      This.
      I've been using Nokia Lumia 800 for some time now, and while some aspects of the product are very polished, my overall opinion is negative.

      Sample problems:
      - some tiles are animated, some not - pretty distracting experience.
      - while the interface is responsive, you still need to do several taps and slides to get a result you can set a single tap under an Android or iPhone.
      - 50k apps in the market if neither can do stuff I need.
      - no Google apps I need - sorry, Nokia, your phone needs to be able to join ex

It was kinda like stuffing the wrong card in a computer, when you're stickin' those artificial stimulants in your arm. -- Dion, noted computer scientist

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