Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Businesses Cellphones Handhelds Microsoft Windows

After MS-Nokia Pact, Many Nokia Workers Walk Out In Protest 601

Posted by timothy
from the let's-enjoy-the-brisk-finnish-air dept.
Mr. McGibby writes "After the announcement of the partnership between Nokia and Microsoft this morning workers voiced their concern with the deal by walking out of Nokia facilities. It is believed that as many as a thousand workers marched out today (or took the day off using flex time) so that the company would know that they don't believe the partnership is in their best interest, even after CEO' Stephen Elop's startlingly frank 'burning platform' memo earlier this week."
Looks like many investors felt the same way.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

After MS-Nokia Pact, Many Nokia Workers Walk Out In Protest

Comments Filter:
  • Looking for Job (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mudpup (14555) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @12:07AM (#35183408) Homepage Journal

    If I worked at Nokia I would be looking for a job, like yesterday.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 12, 2011 @12:13AM (#35183430)

    How about people that work on Qt? Hopefully Nokia will not end up killing the best toolkit that exists for desktop development.

  • Doh! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @12:20AM (#35183486)

    Of course it's a stupid idea. But what did they expect? They hired a former MS exec to be their CEO. Of course he would make them dependent on MS - that's the only thing the fool can be expected to know.

    It's like SGI hiring a former HP exec to be their CEO and then killing off MIPS to move to Itanium - totally and utterly predictable because these guys only know the bubble they've been in for most of their corporate career. They can't "think outside of the box" because they are the box.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 12, 2011 @12:20AM (#35183488)

    A Nokia executive once said that switching to Android would be like peeing your pants for warmth. It might help temporarily, but would turn your phones into commodities. Nokia would be forced to sell based on price alone!

    I submit that going with WP7 is worse. It has all the disadvantages of Android in that your competitors can use it also, so it turns your phones into commodities. But it has none of the advantages - the extensive Android market, UI customization, and no OS licensing fee.

    Using WP7 is like peeing your pants while Redmond gives you a golden shower.

  • Re:Nokia who? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by sjames (1099) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @12:32AM (#35183536) Homepage

    Now musing a little, I wonder isn't a partnership with MS one of the last things a company does either before being acquired by MS or filing for bankruptcy?

    The path MS has traveled is littered with former partners, all with knives in their backs.

  • by msauve (701917) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @12:47AM (#35183592)
    You think the two are mutually exclusive?
  • by mehrotra.akash (1539473) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @12:57AM (#35183652)
    Not really, in current smartphones, the screen itself costs upwards of $20 I believe. Whereas non smartphones are available for less than $20.
    Assuming that the cost of an Android phone comes down to say $30, the price of a non smartphone will most prob. go down to $5 or so(only a tiny monochrome screen, cheaper processor,smaller battery-- infact one of the phones launched for approx$50 here has a standby time of 30 days, and the option of using AA cells in an emergercy)
    You need to live in a developing nation to know the needs..
  • by jappleng (1805148) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:03AM (#35183678) Homepage Journal
    I tend to like peeing in my pants to stay warm as much as the next guy but I don't think that's going to resolve anything. There are two paths that companies can take to make a hardware/platform successful. You can either act like a pope and tell the world that it's the single most greatest thing in all existence and everyone will follow you like a cult, or you can create a developer friendly environment that makes your heart warm from working with the system. Microsoft has never come out with software that makes your teeth crunch for software development, XNA for example is an incredible environment and it isn't fixated on Java like Google. So there is more potential simply because it's not using Java, and more people will love working with it.

    However you do run into some exceptions... Sony offers terrible platforms, like the PS2, PSP, and PS3. A friend who is developing for the PSP2 told me it's just as bad but Sony has a lot of backup. PS2 was one of the most successful systems in gaming history, in fact, it probably still is. If it were up to me, I would love to see phones developed under WP7 instead of Android, Symbian, and iOS, just because from experience, it's a better system to work with. However, the mass-market is already all over iOS and Android already which makes it really hard for Microsoft to keep up and Palm recently announced that their trying to be the third wheel so to speak. As a developer, there are too many options and you will ultimately pick the platform that will make you the most money. That's why in reality, Microsoft isn't a good platform to take, at least not yet.
  • Re:Looking for Job (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Bill_the_Engineer (772575) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:10AM (#35183704)

    Actually I think it would be better to keep a job. Be honest, you wouldn't quit a paying job. Of course you meant that you'd start looking at the employment sites during your off time.

    I don't think this will be the end of Nokia. If anything it may be the smartest thing they've done. They obviously been stagnate way too long and there are just too many handset manufacturers jumping on the android bandwagon. This leaves Nokia with the option of being just another lemming going with Android or differentiating themselves by hooking up with Microsoft. Frankly going with Google or Microsoft is better than Nokia's status quo.

  • Re:Wow (Score:3, Insightful)

    by PopeRatzo (965947) * on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:12AM (#35183714) Homepage Journal

    In the USA, if you walk out on your job like this (and you'd have to walk out, because chances are you don't have flex time) you'd be, essentially, screwed.

    In the US, if you work for a living, you're screwed.

  • by Alex Belits (437) * on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:19AM (#35183750) Homepage

    1. Because manufacturers don't bother documenting hardware of providing drivers for more than one OS. (Ex: how Linux did run on iPAQ).
    2. Because (1) will remain true for proprietary phone control stack even if it won't for the rest of hardware.

    Nokia's implementation of Meego was supposed to have the first completely open cellular interface. Good luck getting that with Microsoft lackey at the helm.

  • by gstrickler (920733) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:23AM (#35183758)
    ...the day Nokia committed suicide, abandoning their own top selling smartphone OS for one of the worst selling smartphone OS on the market.
  • Re:Wow (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Capt. Skinny (969540) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:43AM (#35183836)

    It's just one more way we're behind the rest of the world

    How is that "behind"? If I have slackers working for me, I don't want red tape standing in the way of my getting rid of them. This is especially true in small business, where margins are tight and you can't afford to pay people who don't produce.

  • by sunspot42 (455706) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:48AM (#35183846)

    >Not really, in current smartphones, the screen itself costs upwards of $20 I believe.

    And what will a similar screen cost in 3 years? Probably $5. Tomorrow's smartphones will be as cheap as or cheaper than today's featurephones. Maybe everybody in the developing world won't be able to afford one, but hundreds of millions of people certainly will.

    Motorola just announced an Android phone that can be hooked up to a docking station and connect to a monitor and full sized keyboard for use as a little computer. What happens in the developing world when your $50 smartphone can also double as your office and/or home computer? Suddenly that $50 smartphone looks like a pretty incredible deal.

  • Re:Wow (Score:1, Insightful)

    by DigiShaman (671371) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:48AM (#35183848) Homepage

    It's just that firing someone in the US is easier than anywhere else in the world. It's just one more way we're behind the rest of the world.

    Ya, behind the rest of the world in a race to the bottom you mean. Seriously, making it difficult to fire someone is precisely why we have bad customer service from government institutions, higher prices, and crappy quality. It only gets worse when you put Unions into the mix. In fact, it was the UAW that drove our domestic automotive industry into the ground, and all of Michigan paid a price for it.

    The idea that people are "entitled" to keep their job, for whatever reason grates on me. If it's that big if a deal to you, then form your own company and be self-employed.

    Signed: A fellow citizen who busts his ass off every day to earn an honest living and refuses to accept hand-outs.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 12, 2011 @01:58AM (#35183888)

    Big difference there - Nokia is well-established as-is (especially in Europe), and becoming "just another WinPhone vendor" is a major demotion.

  • Re:Looking for Job (Score:5, Insightful)

    by node 3 (115640) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @02:06AM (#35183908)

    If anything it may be the smartest thing they've done.

    How often is partnering with Microsoft the smartest thing anyone's done?

  • Re:Well, obviously (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Urkki (668283) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @02:58AM (#35184104)

    Just out of curiosity, what else were they going to do?

    About what they did now, and just a bit more... Two alternatives to choose from:

    1. Get the partner (Google or MS) accept adding Qt to the platform. That would have gained them a lot of developer love. Now they need to start a developer community completely from scratch, with old Nokia developers really pissed off, after the earlier Qt hype.

    2. Get support for current partner platform (had it been Android or WP7) on Symbian and/or Meego. Like, Silverlight support for Symbian. This may not have gained them any Free Software love, but it would have given meaning to current Symbian line, and made a lot of commercial developers happy.

    But now, they created a situation where they have no continuity between platforms, and bunch of angry developers who don't know what to do with Nokia now. I mean, isn't it practically like "if you want to develop for future Nokia, buy HTC now"? WTF.

    I hope next week they'll take some corrective action. I actually hope it's been planned from the start, giving extra bad news first, then "clarifying" so bad news don't sound so horrible.

    But if it is what it looks like now, who in their right mind is going to buy a Symbian phone? Nokia will run out of money before they get their first WP7 phone out of the door. But it's also quite believable that this was the plan, and MS will buy them out when the stock price is low enough.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 12, 2011 @03:00AM (#35184112)

    Throwing acronyms around doesn't make you informed.

    The UAW didn't wreak the US economy or the auto market. Americans wreaked themselves collectively believing a bunch of corporate bullshit being promoted heavily by corporate created think tanks which started hitting full force in the 70s. They even got one of their spokespeople to run the nation into the ground for them (I'll let you guess who.) Bigger trends played bigger roles than a union stuck in a bygone era with forward thinking contracts and benefit packages which actually did more to heighten the decline of the USA than it showed their greed (which is how it was portrayed and continues to be.)

    Everybody can't be the boss and form their own business even if we were all equally capable of it. Somebody has to be an employee. Fairly paid workers are not a handout; union workers are not handouts they are just not pushed around like pawns so easily-- like the permanent 20% underemployed people we have today who have zero bargaining power.

    Unless you can live like the Chinese, we can't compete with the former communist's ability to out capitalize us.

  • Re:Wow (Score:4, Insightful)

    by CRCulver (715279) <crculver@christopherculver.com> on Saturday February 12, 2011 @03:07AM (#35184136) Homepage

    Seriously, making it difficult to fire someone is precisely why we have bad customer service from government institutions

    Correlation does not imply causation. I'm quite happy with the service from my government, and though people might grumble occasionally to make conversation, polls indicate a high level of satisfaction among my compatriots.

    It only gets worse when you put Unions into the mix.

    A miniscule percentage of American workers have belonged to unions, and yet you are so ready to blame unions for your ills. Meanwhile there are countries where the vast majority of workers belong to a union, and the economy does fine and unemployment is not much higher than in the US at good times.

  • by xtracto (837672) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @03:23AM (#35184178) Journal

    Now that Microsoft is going to assimilate Nokia, I am sure QT is in great danger. I pray that someone would get it and continue making it great as it is.

  • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @03:27AM (#35184192)

    In fact, the numbers I've heard indicate that OEMs pay more to Google for each Droid (or similar) than they do to Microsoft for each WP7 phone. It's still only a few dollars each way, but Android is only free if you don't include *any* of Google's services on it.

    Of course you're ignoring the big elephant there in the corner. Who cares whether Microsoft charges less per handset than Google, given that just about no one the company's trying to sell phones to wants a Windows phone? What actually matters is that Android phones are actually desirable, while customers' opinions regarding Windows phones have been spiraling around the drain for 2-3 years now.

  • by phantomfive (622387) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @04:17AM (#35184366) Journal
    Protip: if you don't want to sound like an astroturfer, don't say things that could have come from a Microsoft marketing pamphlet; sure they want you to believe that "XNA is an incredible environment," but it's not that much better or worse than any other graphics framework.

    Also saying that another platform is bad because it uses Java just shows your inexperience. Even if you don't particularly like Java (I don't), it is certainly an adequate language. It's a n00b mistake. People who love programming will enjoy making cool graphics in Java as much as in C#.

    Incidentally, my one major complaint about WP7 development is that Microsoft forces you to stay in the C# sandbox. They don't let you out into native code, which is a serious drawback for stuff I want to do. Even Apple lets you write native code on your own phone, calling any API; they just won't let you put it in the app store if it does too much. Microsoft won't let you out of the sandbox at all. Annoying.
  • Re:Looking for Job (Score:5, Insightful)

    by IICV (652597) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @04:35AM (#35184452)

    Actually I think it would be better to keep a job. Be honest, you wouldn't quit a paying job. Of course you meant that you'd start looking at the employment sites during your off time.

    Uhm yeah, if you're an American. See, Americans generally have 1. No (or little) savings and 2. Almost no safety net.

    This means that if you object to something your company does, the only recourse is to passive-aggressively start sneaking around looking for other work - because you must be employed at all times, and not having a job is simply not an option. You can't actually, you know, make a stand or anything - your current life literally depends on the good graces of the company you work for, which means that you simply cannot do anything to piss them off unless you already have another company ready to take you in.

    I mean, there's a reason why people call our current society "neo-feudalism".

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday February 12, 2011 @04:40AM (#35184470)

    I can't recall another time I've posted anonymously.

    I worked with Stephen Elop back in the Macromedia days, starting with him being my boss^2, in the late 90's. I've always found him a fascinating exec to watch. In the four years or so I saw him at Macromedia, I watched him:
    1. Come into IT, get the existing CIO kicked out, become the CIO, and fuck IT up[0]; so they promoted him and
    2. He came into the Andromedia purchase, ran that business group for about a week which was long enough to fuck it up; so they promoted him and
    3. He started a brand new business group (Internal name ... Whirlwind, I think?) for about three months which was long enough to fuck it up; so they promoted him ...

    The pattern reached its logical conclusion when he became CEO of the company and then ... sold it to Adobe.

    Stephen is the most perfect example I've ever seen of the sometimes-mythic "failing upward" tendency. He turns everything he touches to shit, and ... then gets rewarded for it. It's like magic. I look forward to Nokia failing miserably, being sold to Microsoft, Stephen making billions out of the deal, and getting elected President of the United States, which he will drive into the ground, formally make into a Chinese colony like Hong Kong, and finally get promoted to God.

    [0] Favorite story from that time: At the beginning of my time at Macromedia, our website was running on four servers, and I remember one time for a stupid reason three were not taking traffic. The first reason we found out about this was because someone mentioned the website was "a little slow." And we were taking tons of traffic. So Stephen came in and forced us to have a dynamic website. Hey, that's a GOOD idea. And then he decided we should use Broadvision for this. Which was a steaming pile of shit which BV recommended we reboot "as often as you can" because it was unstable. Which required horrific investments of money (we were buying Sun E4500s like there was no tomorrow and putting in 14GB of RAM in each -- back when Sun RAM was at around $7000 per GB). Which Stephen brought in KPMG to "help us" implement, which had the predictably hilarious results that anyone here who's worked with a big consulting shop has likely seen for themselves.

  • by kovari (34550) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @06:16AM (#35184746)

    What the fuck have you people been doing for all these years?

    Apparently, they were being mismanaged.

  • by shutdown -p now (807394) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @06:30AM (#35184798) Journal

    Microsoft has never come out with software that makes your teeth crunch for software development

    I really wish that was true (and appreciate that there are people out there who honestly believe it). Alas, you're mistaken.

    Here's an exercise for you. Find a nearest developer with some experience extending SharePoint. Ask him what he thinks about the API, the documentation, and overall design. Count the expletives. Zen will be that much closer.

  • Re:Looking for Job (Score:5, Insightful)

    by citizenr (871508) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @06:45AM (#35184870) Homepage

    Shareholders? You're kidding, right? It took 5 or 6 years for the Xbox to break even, before that Microsoft was burning thru tens of millions every year just keeping the xbox afloat. But guess what? It paid off

    Xbox division stopped making a loss, they did NOT start making profit (and wont for next ~10 years).
    No, earning more than you spend during one quarter doesnt count if you pumped $6B in R&D and marketing.
    Kinect alone was $600mil in marketing _before_ if even hit the shelves.

  • Re:Looking for Job (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Raenex (947668) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @07:50AM (#35185148)

    M$

    I stop reading here.

  • Re:Looking for Job (Score:5, Insightful)

    by BBCWatcher (900486) on Saturday February 12, 2011 @08:46AM (#35185388)

    How often is partnering with Microsoft the smartest thing anyone's done?

    Intel has done OK.

You will lose an important disk file.

Working...