Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Cellphones Handhelds Software

Amazon To Launch 'Amazon Appstore For Android' 222

Posted by samzenpus
from the welcome-to-the-party dept.
angry tapir writes "Amazon is preparing to open an Android app store to compete with Google's Android Market, and has launched a beta portal where developers can submit applications for Android-based smartphones. The applications will be sold on the Amazon Appstore for Android, which the company expects to launch later this year. At launch, the Appstore will be available for customers in the US, and it will be compatible with Android 1.6 and higher. Users will be able to shop for applications from their PCs, which isn't possible with the existing version of Android Market, or from their smartphones, and pay with their existing Amazon account."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Amazon To Launch 'Amazon Appstore For Android'

Comments Filter:
  • since it doesn't specify the V7 processor. I wanted to port my firefox plugin [mozilla.org] to android and I had to go with a newer android build because FF requires the V7 spec processor.
  • Was wondering when Amazon was going to enter the fray.

    They already have a music store, selling apps isn't that big of a jump.

    Already having peoples credit card numbers and the trust of most will also helps.

    • by GaryOlson (737642)
      I see Amazon using the Android apps as a loss leader to sell the rest of their inventory. Buy a book, get the ebook at 50%, and have a free book app for your Android. Buy some computer software/hardware/other gadget, get an Android app at 50% off or free depending on price/volume. How many obsessive compulsives do you know who would buy a home weather station if it could constantly report the conditions to their smartphone? Or cat monitor, or fridge status, etc etc.

      Even if all these types of software alre
      • They already have a Kindle app for Android; why on earth try to cannibalize its sales? The whole selling point of Kindle is its buy once, read anywhere philosophy (and it really does that quite well). Per-book apps break that.
        • Bigger question then: Is Amazon going to decide what to sell my app for or am I the developer going to set the price?

          • by KuNgFo0 (519426)
            They've stated in the terms that you can suggest a price, but ultimately Amazon decides what to charge for your app. I can't imagine any developer actually being happy with this arrangement.
  • AppBrain (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rhook (943951) on Wednesday January 05, 2011 @10:11PM (#34772600)

    "Users will be able to shop for applications from their PCs, which isn't possible with the existing version of Android Market"

    Guess they haven't heard about AppBrain.

    http://www.appbrain.com/app/appbrain-app-market/com.appspot.swisscodemonkeys.apps [appbrain.com]

    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      The Android market doesn't have this functionality by itself. It's really irritating. Nice to have a third party site that helps browsing apps, but that doesn't mean Googles app store doesn't have room for improvement.

    • by I8TheWorm (645702) *

      Appbrain's ability to push to the device was broken by the latest Market release.

      Sucks.

  • Wouldn't it be great if Amazon could open a competing Apple app store, and then people could have free choice to buy wherever they please, just like in the real world?

    That'd be anti-capitalist, though.

    • Wouldn't it be great if Amazon could open a competing Apple app store, and then people could have free choice to buy wherever they please, just like in the real world?

      Yes, that would be awesome.

      On a related note, it's interesting how when it comes to Apple, people argue that only having one store is anti-competitive, over-controlling and locked down. On Android, when someone actually tries to make another store, people complain about lockdown (???) and fragmentation.

      There's just no pleasing some people.

      • by slim (1652)

        it's interesting how when it comes to Apple, people argue that only having one store is anti-competitive, over-controlling and locked down. On Android, when someone actually tries to make another store, people complain about lockdown (???) and fragmentation.

        There's just no pleasing some people.

        That's because they're different people.

  • by CheerfulMacFanboy (1900788) on Wednesday January 05, 2011 @10:14PM (#34772626) Journal
    when the first apps will be remotely removed from phones?
    • when the first apps will be remotely removed from phones?

      Actually this is a step away from this happening. Unless Google and Amazon agree to remotely remove all apps at the exact same time, this means the app in question wouldn't necessarily be gone forever. This is an advantage you Android lot have over Apple's App Store.

      • by tlhIngan (30335)

        Actually this is a step away from this happening. Unless Google and Amazon agree to remotely remove all apps at the exact same time, this means the app in question wouldn't necessarily be gone forever. This is an advantage you Android lot have over Apple's App Store.

        Except well, you gotta pay twice for the same app... I don't think there's any sort of sharing between the two.

        Funny enough, I don't think Apple actually has the ability to remotely remove apps from phones. At least, for all pulled apps, they ca

  • by SuperKendall (25149) on Wednesday January 05, 2011 @10:39PM (#34772780)

    The more interesting thing about this store is the terms for developers - almost the same as Apple's store.

    $99/Year (I think that's being waved for now)
    You can choose to have apps have a DRM wrapper (of Amazons design)
    Amazon gets 30% of sales

    I think potentially this could become THE app store for Android, because it will be probably about as carefully maintained as Apple's App store. No way is Amazon going to let through some things like blatant copyright infringement apps that get into the Android store today. As a result the apps to be found there should be of a generally higher level of quality.

    • by Xiroth (917768)

      Precisely. The advantage that Android retains over developing for iOS devices, though, is that if Amazon shoot down your application on whatever grounds (such as what happens with Apple), you can always be sure that you'll be able to find another app store to publish through.

      What I think that we'll see is 'tiered' app stores - Amazon and perhaps a couple of other companies will run the top tiered app stores where everything is carefully checked and things like pornography is not allowed; then Google and a c

    • by wvmarle (1070040)

      I think potentially this could become THE app store for Android, because it will be probably about as carefully maintained as Apple's App store. No way is Amazon going to let through some things like blatant copyright infringement apps that get into the Android store today.

      You may make it sound like not having such apps available is a good thing for the end users. I'd say let the end user decide on that.

      On my phone I have a "whack-a-mole" type game. I think it's quite funny. PETA/SPCA members may disagree though.

      Now if you were talking about a vetting process to prevent malware from entering the store... an app should do what it says it does, no more no less. That's what it should be vetted on, and that's all it should be vetted on. Let the buyer decide whether they want su

      • by SuperKendall (25149) on Wednesday January 05, 2011 @11:24PM (#34773028)

        You may make it sound like not having such apps available is a good thing for the end users. I'd say let the end user decide on that.

        It's not a matter of choice, it's a matter of noise. When you have a ton of apps like that in an app store it makes it hard to find "real" applications.

        There's always choice in that you can get apps from all over. What matters more is that users finally will ALSO have the choice to try shopping without as much noise in selection. That choice is more important than any other, for normal people using a phone.

        Now if you were talking about a vetting process to prevent malware from entering the store... an app should do what it says it does, no more no less. That's what it should be vetted on, and that's all it should be vetted on.

        I'm sure there's some aspect of that but it can never be fully examined, but a low-pass filter is helpful to eliminate outright malware. And again, you can go elsewhere for that. Just let real users have a choice of going somewhere they are less likely to find it.

        • by wvmarle (1070040)

          It's not a matter of choice, it's a matter of noise. When you have a ton of apps like that in an app store it makes it hard to find "real" applications.

          Interesting you complain about the volume in the Android store. And you think that Apple's store is better managed, and easier to find apps.

          Let's look at the numbers. Apple claims to have "over 300,000" apps in their store now, while Android is reported to have "over 200,000" apps a few days ago. So there are about 1 1/2 times more apps in the Apple store than in the Android store. There is no reason to believe that the average quality in either store is higher, so there are more "noise" apps floating arou

          • Interesting you complain about the volume in the Android store. And you think that Apple's store is better managed, and easier to find apps.

            Yes, interesting because it is true. The Android store has many, many apps that are just blatant copyright infringement low wuality things, with much gaming of keywords (not that the App Store is immune to that, but it's at a lower level).

            There is no reason to believe that the average quality in either store is higher,

            WTF? There's "no reason" to believe that a store

            • by wvmarle (1070040)

              I don't know and don't care much about the vetting process: the true vetting is done by users. Sort apps by user rating and the good stuff comes up easy enough. And then the user reviews linked to the app on the store are very useful in general.

              Also I don't really like the idea of having just one store, which is having a fairly high barrier to entry, and no alternative options. No option to wade through the noise, which can be entertaining at times.

              That said I have to say I don't have hands-on experience

              • Also I have heard that Apple mainly checks for "objectionable content" (and still lets the "baby shaker" through - no idea how Google deals with such apps), not for whether the app runs stable.

                That is not at all true, I've been involved with developing over a dozen iOS applications at this point. ANY crash means you do not get accepted, period, until you fix the crash. And we're not just talking crash on launch, we've seen multiple cases where they find a crash deep in the app somewhere after they have be

          • by dangitman (862676)

            For me the best way to find apps is not to start in the app store, but to search with google for it, e.g. search for "satnav app for android". Then you get reviews, recommendations, etc from various sources

            Have you tried searching Google for product review lately? Most of the results are tainted with SEO bullshit and price-comparison site whore-mongering. Google is fast becoming useless for searching anything that isn't a Wikipedia entry.

            For fuck's sake, Google routinely delivers about.com results right up top as if they are useful for anything

          • Let's look at the numbers. Apple claims to have "over 300,000" apps in their store now, while Android is reported to have "over 200,000" apps a few days ago. So there are about 1 1/2 times more apps in the Apple store than in the Android store. There is no reason to believe that the average quality in either store is higher

            Of course there's reason. Because Apple are filtering out more noise than Google are. Apparently the Android Store will list any app providing it's not malware. Apple imposes far more qua

    • by ducomputergeek (595742) on Thursday January 06, 2011 @12:20AM (#34773308)

      My big question is what is the payout rules? Do they deposit the money in my checking account automatically? Or do you have to have a minimum sales amount before they'll cut a check?

      I write mobile apps as a hobby. I make enough from the apps that it pays for itself, but not enough to quit the day job. I've been releasing mobile apps for both Android and iOS for a little over a year now.
      I spent the start of this week actually looking at the sales data to get ready for taxes this year and I've come to the conclusion that Android users don't buy apps. iOS users do.

      I do the classic "Lite" version of my apps that are free with ads and then offer a "Full" version for either $0.99 or $1.99 with no ads and usually has a few extra features that didn't make the cut into the lite version.

      The lite version of my flagship app has about 15k iOS downloads and 22k from Google Marketplace.

      I've sold a little over 900 of the "full" versions of the app for iOS but only about 350 for Droid phones @ $1.99 in both marketplaces.

      The problem is, I spend probably 2.5x the time on the Android platform vs. iOS. working out issues between devices/OS versions. Well if you add having to submit to multiple app stores, each with their own submission rules and payout rules, and Android becomes even less and less attractive for people like me.

      • by MattskEE (925706)

        My big question is what is the payout rules? Do they deposit the money in my checking account automatically? Or do you have to have a minimum sales amount before they'll cut a check?

        Having sold some textbooks through Amazon Marketplace they automatically transfer your funds every 14 days, and you can also have your funds transferred as fast as once per day. Here is how Amazon describes it [amazon.com].

        This app marketplace might be run differently, but this is probably a good guideline for how they will disburse funds.

      • by slim (1652)

        Well if you add having to submit to multiple app stores, each with their own submission rules and payout rules, and Android becomes even less and less attractive for people like me.

        There's a business opportunity for someone; a front-end that submits apps to multiple app stores on behalf of the developer, and consolidates the income from sales. How much of a cut they could charge would be decided by just how much hassle they save.

        OTOH, my guess is that the stores will be in competition to make submission hassle-free enough to be worth the developers' effort. It's in everyone's interest.

      • by Timmmm (636430)

        That's not really surprising though. The iPhone is more expensive than almost any Android phone (e.g. iPhone 4 16 GB: £530, Nexus S 16 GB: £430), and there are many cheaper Android phones. iPhone users are already self-selected as those willing to spend more money.

        It seems likely that Android's market share will increase to be much greater than the iPhone's at which point you will make more money from Android. I agree about the multiple app stores though. It is already enough hassle to submit to

  • The multiple app store shenanigans are going to be the hardest thing for Android to overcome if google wants to take a serious bite out of apple. The iPads success isn't hardware as much as it is standardization. Of course google non-support for tablets is the reason...but google enabled the situation to get out of hand. Hopefully honeycomb will fix that.

  • by Jimmy_B (129296) <slashdotNO@SPAMjimrandomh.org> on Thursday January 06, 2011 @12:42AM (#34773420) Homepage

    I'm an Android app developer, and under the terms Amazon's currently offering, there's no way in hell I'll put my app there. There are three very serious problems with it. First, Amazon controls the pricing, not the developer - they can use your app as a loss leader. Second, they require that you give them your app and each update 14 days before you publish it anywhere else (such as on the Android Market) for their review process. That means no emergency fixes, and delayed releases, even if you're mainly publishing on the Android Market and want to put it on Amazon too. And third, it's competing with Android Market, which is preinstalled everywhere, with no users. It would be one thing if they offered more than Android Market's 70% take, but there're simply no advantages to it whatsoever.

    Maybe they'll change their terms, and I'll reconsider. But the terms they're offering now are simply a bad deal for developers, and I doubt many will bite.

    • by mlts (1038732) * on Thursday January 06, 2011 @03:57AM (#34774164)

      Bingo. One of the reasons I love Android and Google's Marketplace is that some apps have a VERY fast development cycle. I have seen features requested for an app in the feedback at 1:30 PM, and an update with that feature in the app by the developer at 4:30 PM the same day. Same with bugs, someone mentions them, they get stomped by fast reacting developers in hours.

      Contrast this to the iOS model where an app developer had an issue with some saved game files, uploaded an update so people can actually save their work, and it took almost 1-2 weeks for the update to appear on iTunes. This was before iTunes Connect was down for the holidays [1].

      This isn't to say Amazon's model is bad. I just fear that instead of being able to choose between Google versus Amazon that the choice will be foisted upon us by whomever gives the cellular carriers a sweeter deal. Both stores have advantages and shortcomings, and having a choice is important. However, if I end up having to choose between Amazon's model versus Google's, I'd choose Google's just because it is a more open way of publishing and allows developers to get stuff fixed and added very quickly.

      [1]: It is understandable Apple turned off iTunes Connect during the Christmas/New Years rush.

    • If you want to maximise your sales, you have to list on all the app stores. There will be people who just look for apps on the Google store, and there will be other people who will just look on the Amazon store. If you're not listed on a store, you're going to lose those potential sales.

      I can see the Amazon store being pretty popular with consumers, because Amazon already have so many customers to market too, with accounts already set up, and because they are vetting apps, there will be a higher level of tr

    • by slim (1652)

      Maybe they'll change their terms, and I'll reconsider. But the terms they're offering now are simply a bad deal for developers, and I doubt many will bite.

      Seems fair enough. You'd probably also reconsider if (IF) the Amazon app store becomes a success, such that a huge chunk of consumers make it their first port of call. If consumers are buying someone else's app instead of yours, because they find it in the app store they prefer using, you're going to want in.

      Possible reasons this might happen include: hardware vendors installing the Amazon store as standard; the Amazon version offering a better app discovery experience.

Pound for pound, the amoeba is the most vicious animal on earth.

Working...