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Microsoft Cellphones Windows Technology

Windows Phone 7 Sales Continue To Struggle 351

Posted by Soulskill
from the clippy-to-the-rescue dept.
rtfa-troll writes "Even with the pre-Christmas buying rush, Microsoft is already desperately offering a new buy one get one free offer similar to the ones they gave for the KIN. According to the article, 'Windows Phone 7 devices can't even manage two per cent of the fortnight's sales.' These aren't official Microsoft figures; they come from online shopping sites. But since Microsoft official sales figures seem subject to manipulation, this is perhaps one of the better guesses we will get at the success of Windows Phone 7 until well into next year. This also strongly backs up other reports of deeply disappointing phone sales. Even Microsoft supporters have been wondering for a while whether it's time for Ballmer to go. If the sales reports are true, then he may be pushed before he jumps."
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Windows Phone 7 Sales Continue To Struggle

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  • by saleenS281 (859657) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @01:27PM (#34358462) Homepage
    BOGO offers are in no way a sign of desperation. WTF is wrong with the submitter, and Soulskill? Android has been doing BOGO's or outright free phones for months/years now. Is it "desperate" or "in trouble" or running with "disappointing sales"? Hey, let's all hate on Microsoft without a shred of evidence, it's slashdot!
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by larry bagina (561269)
      Additionally, Microsoft licenses the OS to manufacturers (like HTC, Samsung, etc) who sell to carriers (Verizon, ATT, Sprint, etc) who sell to consumers. Carriers take a loss on the phone to make money on the monthly charges for the next 2+ years. Carriers set the "retail" price and BOGO offers, not Microsoft/Google, not HTC/Samsung/LG/Motorola.
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Macthorpe (960048)

        Even better than that, the phones they're offering are the HTC Surround, LG Quantum or the Samsung Focus - not the more popular phones such as the Omnia or the HD7, which one can learn from other sources [eweek.com] are selling like the proverbial hot cakes.

        A poor attempt, really.

      • The only functionality I use in my phone these days is the address book. Everything else I do through my iPad. If they'd add phone capabilities to the iPad (a bluetooth earpiece and adding a CDMA radio would do it) then I wouldn't even need a "phone" per se. Sure, I want to carry lots of functionality, but the tiny, tiny universe of a phone's screen just doesn't cut it anymore -- the iPad simply crushed that whole domain for me.

        As I'm carrying the iPad anyway, much less cumbersome and easier to use than

        • by dissy (172727)

          If they'd add phone capabilities to the iPad (a bluetooth earpiece and adding a CDMA radio would do it) then I wouldn't even need a "phone" per se.

          While not exactly native cell phone functionality, I have had great success with whisper [whisper-app.com] voip on my iPad using the normal headphones and mic.
          If you have a 3G enabled iPad, you can then install either My3G or VoIPover3G too. Then you can place and receive calls over wifi, 3g, or bluetooth.

          Whisper even has a 'free' option if you don't mind listening to an ad. (Good for testing purposes anyway.)

          I'm sure there are other VOIP clients out there with different services and price plans.
          Even Skype with My3G would

        • by dissy (172727)

          Sonofa, oops... My mistake

          Whisper is a chat client. The app I meant to share is Whistle!

          http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/whistle-phone/id322326573?mt=8 [apple.com]

        • The iPad's a bit awkward to walk around with in your pocket, isn't it? I can't see something that big ever being as universally accessable as a smart phone.

        • by _Sprocket_ (42527)

          It's all about the right interface for the job. While a pad may provide more real-estate than a smartphone and more mobility than a laptop, it strikes me as being far too bulky to lug around everywhere I go like my smartphone and entirely the wrong platform for general computing tasks. What I want is platforms playing to their strengths and the ability to quickly move data between them. Of course, what I expect is the Industry to tout each platform as the next coming for IT that will completely eliminate

    • by theodp (442580) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @01:43PM (#34358590)

      Samsung Galaxy S (T-Mobile) – buy one, get one free! [twentyfourtimes.com] (Android 2.1 OS). Yes, kind of looks like you need Steve Jobs' reality distortion field to convince people to pay undiscounted prices. :-)

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by bieber (998013)
      Without a shred of evidence? You didn't even have to RTFA, they quoted sales figures in the summary. The buy-one-get-one offer may or may not be indicative of poor sales, but I would say that actual records of being outsold many times over by your competitors definitely indicates poor sales...
      • by saleenS281 (859657) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:02PM (#34358738) Homepage
        Comparing a brand-new phone to ones that already have market-momentum is brain-dead, as has already been discussed on this forum. Android sold nowhere near as many phones their first day/week/month when it first came out. iPhone wasn't much better.
        • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:43PM (#34358976)

          Comparing a brand-new phone to ones that already have market-momentum is brain-dead, as has already been discussed on this forum.

          And, this is Windows Phone version SEVEN, as clearly described in the name of the product. This might be a brand-new phone to mobile application developers, but for the other 99.9% of the people this is just a new revision of the same old horrible Windows phone operating systems.

          It doesn't help at all that this phone is being advertised as "the smartphone for people who don't want a smartphone." Good job finding that marketing niche, Microsoft. What next? Microsoft Fruit Basket 7.0, for people who hate fruit? Microsoft Electric Car 7.0, for people who hate driving?

          It also doesn't help that Microsoft's idea of "synergy" doesn't even bother to include embrace, extend, and extinguish anymore. Instead of eating the competition, the divisions at Microsoft are just eating each other. They didn't make a mobile version of XBox live that works on lots of devices, but works better on Microsoft phones. They didn't make a mobile version of the Windows Media Extender that works on lots of devices, but works better on Microsoft phones. Every time Microsoft comes out with something truly cool or innovative, they never let it stand alone. They bundle it to a flailing product, and then act surprised when it all fails together.

        • by Alioth (221270)

          Oh really?

          The Windows Phone 7 sold 40,000 units on its first day, according to TFA.

          By contrast, the original iPhone sold (on June 29th/June 30th 2007 - I can't find the "first day" sales figures, just the first quarter which happens to only be the first two days of the 1st gen iPhone's sales) 270,000 units. If sales were evenly distributed amongst both days, that would mean first day sales of 135,000 units.

          It must be a strange world where selling 135,000 (more than 3 times as many) is "not much better" than

        • And give me 2 weeks. Dell sold me on this fancy new phone--but won't sell it. How many people are waiting for [insert form factor] phone to have WP7 on it?

        • When Android launched there was no such thing as an Android phone beforehand. Same with the iPhone. This is Windows Phone 7. While it may look different Windows mobile isn't a new platform and MS isn't new to mobile phones.

          But it is that past history that, imo, holds the phone back. People have too many bad experiences with Windows Mobile or even Windows desktops and hold that against the phone. Quite frankly I think the new interface is fucking awful. Maybe MS thinks it's cool to make nothing fit the sc
      • by rmcd (53236) * on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:19PM (#34358854)

        Unless I'm missing something, it's a highly misleading summary. In the TFA, the quoted figures are from a UK price comparison site [mobilesplease.co.uk]. It's not sales, it's site visitors comparing phones.

        There is a discussion of sales, but it's from an article dated Nov 9.

        This is an embarrassing post, even by Slashdot standards.

    • by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @01:47PM (#34358620) Journal
      It is editorializing(hardly shocking in a slashdot submission); but extremely low phone prices, on average, are actually a rather ambiguous sign for the success of a platform, depending in no small part on what the platform was intended to do.

      If Windows Phone 7 was supposed to beat Apple at its own game, the fact that Apple can keep merrily having among the highest 'on-contract' prices with a shitty carrier, while MS has to basically give them away, then this is a sign that MS is failing. If, on the other hand, Windows Phone 7 is supposed to buff MS's mobile marketshare enough to court developers, ideally without hemorrhaging too much money in the process, then contract-subsidized cheap hardware is a pretty logical way of doing that. No matter how good or bad a platform is, its sales will likely be better at a somewhat lower price and developers care about how many potential customers your platform represents. Also, from a pure financial perspective, it strongly depends on who is taking the hit to make the phones that cheap. If MS is getting their licensing fee, and some hardware OEMs are getting squeezed, that will just be business as usual. If MS has been forced to offer a giant pile of 'well, legally, they aren't actually kickbacks and subsidies' then shareholder enthusiasm is going to cool, possibly fast.

      Similarly, with Android, if Android is in fact Google's move into Apple's territory, then the continued low average handset price, and comparatively small market for the Google-blessed 'flagship' models is bad news. On the other hand, if(as was commonly suggested originally) Android is intended as a relatively low-cost way of kicking the dumbphones of the world in the ass and onto the internet, where they can then be used to look at Google ads, then a low handset selling price is actually a feature.
    • I saw original Droid phones for 1 penny (w/ contract) just before the Droid Incredible was released by Verizon. Hardly the same as deep discounting of WP7 units a month after release.

      The marketing at microsoft baffles me too. I don't know any iphone/android/blackberry users that are even remotely interested in the WP7 stuff. People are staying away in droves.

    • by OzPeter (195038)

      WTF is wrong with ... Soulskill?

      I thought we established the other day that soulskill was a kdawson sock-puppet.

      • by Rogerborg (306625)

        WTF is wrong with ... Soulskill?

        I thought we established the other day that soulskill was a kdawson sock-puppet.

        And kdawson is the very small shell script that Taco wrote in 2004 to dupe 3 day old posts.

        At this point, I think it's fair to say that Slashdot has achieved self awareness. It's just not benign sentience.

    • by Threni (635302) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:39PM (#34358954)

      > BOGO offers are in no way a sign of desperation.

      Exactly. It's why you often see BOGOF offers on PS3s, digital cameras etc. It's what you do when your product is a runaway success and you can't keep up with demand.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by node 3 (115640)

      You don't offer BOGO if you can sell both for full price. You mention that Android is selling well. It would seem that BOGO is working for it and is thus a valid tactic.

  • by jav1231 (539129)
    You come to the party late and everyone has filled up on meat, casseroles, and desserts. If you want them to fill that fraction of space they might have left you better bring them something they can't resist.
    • by nospam007 (722110) *

      iCecream?

  • by noz (253073)

    Call me. Steve not knowing what he's doing could only last so long.

    If you want a long-term technology-business-plan, you're new-tech is out-of-touch-tech.

    • by owlstead (636356)

      Don't you think Bill would prefer somebody who can write down coherent sentences? Maybe even sentences without basic grammar mistakes?

  • by TomHandy (578620) <tomhandy&gmail,com> on Saturday November 27, 2010 @01:33PM (#34358512)
    A new phone buyer has a ton of options, between the iPhone, Android, Blackberry and hell, even webOS. For Windows Phone 7 to succeed, Microsoft needs to make a strong and compelling case that says "This is why you should buy a Windows Phone instead", but so far I haven't really seen it. The marketing message seems a bit muddled, focusing on the notion that people use their devices too much and that Windows Phone is all about using it as little as possible - an interesting idea perhaps, but not the strongest and most dynamic message. The real question is if there are a lot of people really dying for that - in theory you might think there are, but in practice people seem to be pretty happy with the way things are working.

    I don't think the Windows Phone approach is bad actually - there is something to be said for a device that really streamlines the experience - but the question is how much the market wants it. I'd have to see evidence that iPhone/Android/Blackberry/webOS users are really dissatisfied with the current way of doing things (in the way that pre-smartphone users were with their regular phones).

    • by tomhudson (43916)
      Two futures:
      1. They'll eventually give them away with Windows when you buy your next laptop. Activate Office.Whatever_the_next_version_is, and get 1 year's service with phone carrier X and some mobile office apps. Use the phone+blutooth as a remote for your laptop when connected to your HDTV, etc. The XBox variant will come with a "buy new games each month and get 1 month's free phone service" and mobile games as a bonus.
      2. WP7 becomes the Kin's next-of-next-of-kin.

      Since Microsoft isn't market-savvy enou

      • by Tapewolf (1639955)
        I strongly suspect that that kind of bundling would have Microsoft nailed to the wall by the antitrust folks.
    • by Locutus (9039)
      I think people like being "connected" and what is more "connected" than being in a conversation with others? Those Windows Phone ads are worthless because they are saying use our phone and you'll be connected less. wrong! I've also heard that they are bringing back the Kin and its message is being always connected. Covering the bases maybe.

      It's funny that for THAT company to have a problem selling "it's easier" but even then, would that even be enough to get customers. I doubt it.

      LoB
      • Those Windows Phone ads are worthless because they are saying use our phone and you'll be connected less.

        Well, I certainly agree that the Windows Phone ads are simply bad. They seem to suggest you won't use your phone that much, but people like me like to use their phone. A different OS isn't going to let me read any faster or play games quicker. However, I wouldn't say they are worthless. They are funny and get remembered. I caught people at work playing the ads and have had links to them posted because th

    • by Motard (1553251)

      I think what they're trying to do doesn't involve the mass retail market. Oh sure, they'd like it to be a hit there, but that's not where their message is the strongest. I think that where they'll try to get their initial momentum is through corporate CIOs. In addition to running Office, WP7 is a platform that can be exploited by the corporate .NET drones Microsoft has been cultivating for all these years. Crates of WP7 phones could be arriving direct without ever going through the retail market.

    • This is exactly it. I want to like WP7, but as a geek / power user, it's definitely not for me. And for, say, my mom? The problem is that I don't really see any meaningful way to reply to a totally reasonable question of "why this rather than iPhone?". Because, let's face it, it's what the default choice would be, unless you're looking for cheaper stuff (and then it's Android).

  • To recap... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by giuseppemag (1100721) <giuseppemag@@@gmail...com> on Saturday November 27, 2010 @01:37PM (#34358546)
    ...no official figures, no official declarations, no after-holiday-season data, no actual news.

    I understand this is slashdot, but come on. Criticism sticks better if it is documented, otherwise it's just another form of shilling.
    • Re:To recap... (Score:4, Interesting)

      by hedwards (940851) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @01:45PM (#34358606)
      The problem is that MS is not likely to let on if the Windows 7 phones are as big a flop as the Kin was. I've heard several figures for that debacle, none of which is over 10k units sold. Other than that, I'm not sure where you'd go to get real numbers from, perhaps AT&T.
  • by frovingslosh (582462) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @01:49PM (#34358648)
    Just like the commercials say - "The Windows 7 Phone. A phone to save us from our phones". They even show how people want to use the other phones, with the clear message that we will not want to use a Windows 7 phone nearly as much. They seem to have actually accomplished their goal, and created a phone that people will be far less obsessed with using than cooler toys like iPhones, Androids and Blackberries.
  • Desperate to stay competitive against iPhone and Android mobile devices, Microsoft has released a two-pound lump of actual cow faeces that they claim constitutes a phone.

    Windows Mobile 7, in development for several years, strips the mobile telephone down to its fundamental essence: futility, annoyance, malfunction, inconvenience and a socially unacceptable odour. Confounding analyst expectations, the turd is in fact shined.

    US mobile carriers hailed the turd as the perfect physical complement to their world-famous customer service. "This powerful product will promote our growth!" said John Harrobin of Verizon Wireless. "We're marketing them as edible."

    "We think we can really work the brand equity," said Steve Ballmer, modelling the optional shoulder-length rubber gloves. "Everyone works with our stuff all day every day. They know who Microsoft is and what we do."

    "How about making our customers actually swallow our bullshit physically?" said John Harrobin. "Windows Mobile 7 was my idea."

    Picture: Steve Ballmer overjoyed at Windows phone sales figures [newstechnica.com].

  • Learn from Honda (Score:3, Insightful)

    by PPH (736903) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:02PM (#34358734)

    Or other Japanese manufacturers*.

    Honda spent years (decades?) building things with small engines. Starting with 90cc motorcycles, they slowly learned the technology and marketplace. As they did so, they slowly worked their way up the product chain until they reached the position they are in now.

    Perhaps Ballmer must go. But does Microsoft have the patience to tough it out for a decade or so, repairing the damage he has done and rebuilding the product teams (while enduring stinking sales figures) before they start to see results?

    *There are numerous examples other than Honda. But it was the only car analogy I could think of.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by NuShrike (561140)

      The wisdom from this is engines were Honda's passion, bread and butter. Everything MS does is about market dominance, no passion, they could care less about profits. As soon as they dominate, MS looses interest (IE, Windows Mobile, Microsoft Money, etc etc).

  • by the linux geek (799780) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:03PM (#34358740)
    So far I really haven't seen any indications that the OS is doing badly. My AT&T store said that the demand for them was high, especially for the Focus, and I've seen similar responses from the T-Mo reps. I don't think you can write off the system until it's been released on the CDMA networks and has had a few updates.

    My personal experience with it has been somewhat mixed. The UI is superb, lightyears beyond Android, but it has its share of weaknesses - a big one I can think of is lack of socket support in the public API. I think this will probably be added in the January update, but in the mean time, it means there are a lot of application types that just aren't available, like an IRC client. The dev tools are generally excellent, just limited in terms of exposed functionality.
    • by hxnwix (652290) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:12PM (#34358804) Journal

      So far I really haven't seen any indications that the OS is doing badly.

      There are clearly more Windows 7 phones in stock than there are people buying Windows 7 phones. If this were a hot seller, there wouldn't be inventory for a buy one get one free deal.

      Also, anything following your disclaimer is sure to actually be happening: "So far I really haven't seen any indications that........"

      • There are clearly more Windows 7 phones in stock than there are people buying Windows 7 phones

        Where does that come from? All I see on the Net are slews of stories from frustrated people about how shops have 2-3 WP7 phones, which go away in a matter of hours.

        If anything, it looks like the number of phones in stock is laughably small, so much so that it raises a brow regarding manufacturers' expectations on how well it'd sell.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by sunspot42 (455706)

          You don't offer "Buy one, get one free" deals on hardware you can't keep in stock.

          Do you see Apple offering such deals? No. Why? Because they truly can't keep their hardware in stock.

          This is basic retail. Whenever you see a "Buy one, get one free" deal, you know somebody is sitting on a pile of sh*t they can't sell!

    • by aristotle-dude (626586) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:23PM (#34358870)

      My personal experience with it has been somewhat mixed. The UI is superb, lightyears beyond Android, but it has its share of weaknesses - a big one I can think of is lack of socket support in the public API.

      So you think that square boxes and text that is cut off is light years ahead of other UIs? Have you browsed the web much? MSFT basically took ideas from flash websites and created an inconsistent UI out of it. Should I really expect any more though from someone with the username "linux geek"? The UI is crap.

      The lack of socket support is a minor issue compared to the lack of copy and paste and a lack of multitasking this late in the game. They rushed it out. There are gaping holes in the API which cause it to be much harder to develop on compared with even Android let alone iOS. iOS provides a rich set of frameworks whereas MSFT platforms usually offer only basic functionality and you have to either "roll your own" or buy an off the shelf third party library.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by sideslash (1865434)

        The lack of socket support is a minor issue compared to the lack of copy and paste and a lack of multitasking this late in the game. They rushed it out. There are gaping holes in the API which cause it to be much harder to develop on compared with even Android let alone iOS. iOS provides a rich set of frameworks whereas MSFT platforms usually offer only basic functionality and you have to either "roll your own" or buy an off the shelf third party library.

        (*yawn*) When the iPhone was released, it didn't have _any_ SDK for writing installed apps, and it stomped all over existing smartphone platforms that did support custom apps, multitasking, clipboard, and sockets -- such as the old Windows Mobile. What made the iPhone a huge success was not its SDK or apps. Just stop think about that for a bit. I think it could be entirely possible for a new smartphone platform to "succeed", i.e. sell widely and turn a large profit, with a tiny app store selection -- if

      • by Missing.Matter (1845576) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @04:55PM (#34359830)

        So you think that square boxes and text that is cut off is light years ahead of other UIs?

        Well, that's the form of the UI, but it's the function that I find more compelling than other phones. The focus for Windows Phone 7 is on Hubs rather than apps. While an app focuses on a single task, a hub integrates similar tasks. For instance, on iOS, if I want to check my friend's twitter feed and a facebook wall, I need two apps to do this; I have to launch one, close it, then launch another. On WP7 there is a single location for this information, and what's more is hubs are extensible, so any service can integrate with them.

        Tiles serve to visualize the contents of hubs (The people tile for example shows pictures of your contacts, the pictures tile shows your photos) and the "cut off text" along with parallax indicates your relative location in the hub. While it seems like these are simply aesthetic choices, if you actually use the device you find they serve a functional purpose

        And anyway, what exactly is the competition doing? Want to talk about iOS, which is essentially a grid of icons? iOS is hardly consistent, as every app has a custom interface. Yes there are a handful of standardized UI elements, but beyond that there is no standardization. The same is true for Android, where every manufacturer is free to re-imagine the user interface.

    • by bds1986 (1268378) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:24PM (#34358878)

      My AT&T store said that the demand for them was high, especially for the Focus, and I've seen similar responses from the T-Mo reps.

      I'd expect nothing less from a salesperson. "This item is wildly unpopular, we have crates of them sitting out the back and we'll never get rid of them all, but please pay the full advertised price" isn't exactly a good marketing pitch. We really need to see figures from a third-party without a vested interest in moving units to determine WP7's success/failure.

      • by KarmaMB84 (743001)
        It's a sneaky sales tactic they've been doing with Android phones for quite a while. They could do a sale for 50% (of the upfront price, not the inflated monthly payment cost) off or go the sneaky route and score a contract or contract extension for two phones by making you buy two of them to get the "deal".
    • by Alioth (221270)

      Lack of a socket library in a communications device!? That, to my mind is unforgivable.

      Even my Sinclair ZX Spectrum has a socket library. For a "modern security device" that connects to the Internet to not have a socket API leaves me, well, speechless.

  • I might be the exception, but when I saw a picture [mobilemarketingwatch.com] of a phone with this OS, my first reaction was to think it's plain ugly. I wouldn't buy one just for that. Does anyone else think it looks ugly, too?

    • The biggest stylistic victory of the phone is to give you a feeling of spaciousness and ease of movement that the other phones don't give you. I really admire the way they did it, but it doesn't come across in a single screenshot. I agree with you that the color combinations are horrible, but they do create an 'unshiny' retro feel that distinguishes them from other phones.

      For some reason, Microsoft stylistically seems stuck in the 70s the same way Apple stylistically is stuck in a futuristic white shiny
    • by qmaqdk (522323)

      It has the trademark Microsoft style: design by committee

      You can almost tell the key topics the committee came up with:
      * Copy Apple's design, but not too much
      * Put in a Windows logo, 'cause Windows is a cool brand
      * We need to buttons big, so everyone can hit them

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by sideslash (1865434)
      It's understandable that you're not excited by that stock screenshot. But the whole point of the start screen is that is different for each person. It shows media customized to you -- social networking updates, contacts, photos. If you ever get a WP7 and watch it populate the start screen with stuff from your personal accounts, you will probably at least have a better appreciation for it, even if you still prefer Android or iOS. It's hard to explain, but it's the difference between seeing a row of cold,
  • I have said this for two years, since they dumped the old Windows Mobile. Someone inside Microsoft was given one last shot at a technological solution. This was not given much hope, kind of like John McCain's campaign, but the culture dictated it. The financial managers are just waiting for the first two quarters of dismal results to report before launching their plan to regroup, focusing solely on the enterprise, and buying RIM while their mobile market share is low enough to get the acquisition past th
  • Not too bad actually (Score:4, Informative)

    by sunfly (1248694) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:32PM (#34358914)

    Ars summed it up nicely, their launch numbers are not as bad as some are making it sound, certainly not horrible Windows phone 7 launch numbers explained. [arstechnica.com]

    They have a lot to add to this new OS to catch the competition, but they know that, they simply had to ship. Overall it is a very well laid out OS with some great ideas. In the big picture the smartphone market is still very young. Microsoft has a lot of talented people, and backed into a corner Balmer might just let them perform. It is way too early to start pointing fingers and snickering.

  • by Forrest Kyle (955623) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @02:35PM (#34358928) Homepage
    They shouldn't have attached the "Windows" brand to their phone. Windows is a desktop operating system. It has a popularized reputation (warranted or not) for being unwieldy, crashing, being expensive, and mostly dedicated to the accomplishment of boring or undesirable tasks like work, writing papers, using Office, etc. They should have created a new brand for the phone.

    Having a "Windows Phone" from Microsoft is sort of like IBM coming out with a social networking site called "The IBM Human Interaction System" and then marketing it to young people as hip and cool. There is an emotional and/or psychological disconnect between the nature of the product and the mental conception people have of the brand.

    Even though it's stupid, when I see the Android ads I think "oh cool, an ANDROID! I wonder what it can do? It looks futuristic. I kind of want one." (note: I don't have a smart phone because I think they are stupid.) However, when I hear the word "Windows Phone", it makes me feel like getting one would be like keeping a chunk of my job in pocket. No thanks.
    • by Nyder (754090)

      ... (note: I don't have a smart phone because I think they are stupid.) ....

      rofl

    • by cyber-vandal (148830) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @04:14PM (#34359506) Homepage

      Microsoft trying to be cool is like dad trying to dance.

    • by Eil (82413)

      Windows is a desktop operating system. It has a popularized reputation (warranted or not) for being unwieldy, crashing, being expensive, and mostly dedicated to the accomplishment of boring or undesirable tasks like work, writing papers, using Office, etc.

      And yet, every year millions of consumers in search of a fast shiny new computer still actively seek out one that runs Windows. Even though many of them know that the Mac is supposed to be an easier experience out of the box, familiarity and compatibility

  • ...it isn't dead yet.

    Wouldn't it be kinder to put it out of its misery, though?

  • by serutan (259622) <snoopdougNO@SPAMgeekazon.com> on Saturday November 27, 2010 @03:58PM (#34359396) Homepage

    When people use Windows 7 sales numbers to show how successful and popular Windows 7 is, I keep reminding them that the numbers primarily reflect PC sales. Windows 7 just happens to be there. Sales of new cars automatically implies sales of new tires, not that the tires themselves are a hit with consumers. What we're seeing in Windows phone sales is an example of the dismal performance of most Microsoft products when they actually have to compete on an equal footing.

  • Folks cannot trust Microsoft that it will stick with Windows Phone 7 in the long run. They have seen Pocket PC, Zune, and various embedded OSes and gadgets from Microsoft abandoned in the last couple of years.
    • by Shados (741919) on Saturday November 27, 2010 @04:32PM (#34359682)

      Thats unfortunately the issue. Microsoft has been going "Try something, if its not a uber success after 2 weeks, drop it, start over with something else". After getting screwed with the Zune (which was a formidable device at the time) in Canada (no music store ever made the light of day, even though they promised over and over and over), the Zune HD virtually not making it out of the states (and got forgotten after its first push), I don't see why Windows 7 Phone (which IS completely awesome btw) would be any different.

      As a .NET dev who knows Silverlight, I could easily go and make stuff for Windows Phone 7. Will I? Lol, I'm not that stupid...

  • says it's about 77K people. You can probably discount about ~50K of that as the developers and MS/Dell employee giveaway, however.

    http://www.facebook.com/apps/application.php?id=135892916448833&v=info [facebook.com]

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