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Cellphones Communications Internet Explorer Microsoft

Microsoft Unveils 'Pink' Phones As Kin One and Two 278

Posted by kdawson
from the japanese-schoolgirls-have-moved-on dept.
adeelarshad82 writes "Microsoft has recently launched two new phones known as the Kin One and Kin Two, previously codenamed 'Pink.' The phones are designed to appeal to social-networking-focused teens, which is probably why the marketing team has tried to spice up the packaging of the phones. According to a Microsoft official the phones are named Kin because they 'knit together ... kindred spirits.' The phones have a keyboard. The Kin One has a 5-megapixel camera, while the Kin Two's 8-megapixel camera can shoot 720p HD video. Both cameras include an LED flash. The One has a mono speaker, the Two's is stereo. One includes 4GB of on-board memory and the Two has 8GB. Both Kin phones have touch screens. According to the hands-on, the Kin phones are based on the same Windows CE core as Windows Phone 7, and they have an IE-based browser. These phones have no downloadable apps, no games, not even a calendar. They're not meant to be expandable smart phones; instead, very good messaging phones."
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Microsoft Unveils 'Pink' Phones As Kin One and Two

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  • by grub (11606) <slashdot@grub.net> on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:31PM (#31837410) Homepage Journal

    "No apps. Less functionality than an iPhone. Lame."
    See, Taco, this is how you make correct prophecies...

    .
  • by sznupi (719324) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:34PM (#31837470) Homepage

    ...and yet, apparently, without any way to do IM (at least Wikipedia page and links there about them says so)

    Seriously, WTF? I could understand their lack of expandability, software-wise (especially if the price is right), if the "social" package they provide is right (though by no means unique - see INQ phones). But no IM? How did that get through?

    • by jonnythan (79727) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:04PM (#31837988) Homepage

      IM is basically worthless if you have SMS.

      SMS > IM.

      • by nlawalker (804108)

        How so? Don't carriers require you to pay through the nose for SMS, where IM would be part of the data connection you already pay for?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Wait, SMS, the IM protocol which you cannot easily use on a computer, has no support for status messages, limits messages to 160 characters, and costs money to use? What IM protocol has trouble beating that?
        • by moogied (1175879)
          Ones NOT built into every phone sold in the last 10 years.
          Genius.
        • by Rakishi (759894)

          Except for slashdot users most people don't spend that much time at their computer and a single platform is more intuitive for them. SMS messages are automatically split and re-assembled so size is irrelevant. Teens will have unlimited plans so cost is not a concern.

          SMS also doesn't have to deal with inability to receive offline messages, server reconnects/disconnects, multiple formats for sending non-text data and so on.

        • limits messages to 160 characters

          The 90s called and it wants its cell phone back.

          Actually I think the 90s was the last time I had a cell phone with no calendar.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by dbcad7 (771464)

        SMS > IM.

        SMS survives only because there are people without data plans.. People who have a data plan often add in small SMS plan to their phone because they have some friends who still don't have a data plan.. as data plans increase, there will be less people who do this.. I pay a little extra for SMS, but not for much longer.

      • by ceoyoyo (59147) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @10:59PM (#31841774)

        That's hilarious. SMS is obscenely expensive, very unreliable, limited to phones, and very expensive. Yes, expensive is in there twice for a reason.

    • by cybrthng (22291)

      How many people use IM on their smartphones? I don't know a single person who does. Its SMS/MMS/Twitter/Facebook et all all the way.

      I'm sure though its only a matter of time before IM functionality is incorporated since the phone is based on cloud services anyway.. instead of an "app for that" it will be a "cloud service" for that.

      I really like the fact that MS is consuming external services and publishing them to end users rather than re-inventing them.. can't say the same for google buzzzzzz

  • Way to go (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Kranerian (1427183) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:35PM (#31837478)

    "These phones have no downloadable apps, no games, not even a calendar. They're not meant to be expandable smart phones; instead very good messaging phones."

    Nice job, Microsoft. Way to ignore the growing trends in favor of your own way. After all, you certainly know better than those lousy consumers.

    In all fairness, though, they'll probably sell like hotcakes in the niche market they're designed for. I just don't see it as a very big market.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by grub (11606)

      In all fairness, though, they'll probably sell like hotcakes in the niche market they're designed for.

      They'll be the first (and last) phone which has MILEY in its A9 dictionary.
    • Re:Way to go (Score:5, Insightful)

      by MozeeToby (1163751) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:44PM (#31837648)

      Tweens and Teens sounds like a pretty big market to me. Depending on the price they'll either do alright or fail miserably. If Jr want's a $200 smart phone but one of these can be had for $50 you can bet there's going to be a lot of parents that take something like this as a compromise. If the options are spend $400 (+$30 per month) or something at a more reasonable price that gets by with a smaller data plan, parents will jump all over it (lest they be labeled 'bad parents' by their kids for not getting them what they want).

      Time will tell, we don't really know enough about the phones to say much at the moment. To me they look like the almost-but-not-quite smart phones that are already on the market today. MS might be too late to the party to see major sales.

      • In the UK you get better phones free with a pay as you go plan. If your offering is worse than free, then you've lost, badly.
        • by Knara (9377)
          In the US you have a very limited selection when it comes to phones that come with pay-as-you-go plans, usually necessitating that you spend about ~$50 a decent non-free phone, and they rape you for texting.
      • by MBCook (132727)

        At this point, an iPhone one generation removed (currently the 3G, by the end of the summer the 3GS) can be had for $100, brand new.

        They are going to have to go for the $0-$25 after subsidy market if they want to use price. The Palm Pre is pretty cheap, and has many of these features. There is always a Blackberry that is basically free.

        It's an interesting little phone, but it seems like it is a feature phone that should have come out a year or so ago.

        In fact, it seems like it would be most interested if

      • They look like almost-but-not-quite smart phones that are already on the market today

        Indeed, they do look like today's features phones. However, look closer and you'll see that their friends and "internet friends" social hub could be a killer app. People seem to think condensing all the social networks into one spot is the bee's knees.

        Then throw in the "Apple pretty" interface thanks to the nVidia Tegra chip, and you've got a feature phone ahead of the curve.

      • by fractoid (1076465) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @08:38PM (#31841088) Homepage

        Tweens and Teens sounds like a pretty big market to me.

        Yeah, I was looking at that...

        • Marketed specifically at teenage girls
        • Camera that can shoot 720p video
        • LED flash / light for shooting in low light
        • The frequency with which stupid teenage girls already take nude pix of themselves

        This phone is specifically designed to increase the supply of questionable-legal-age teen pron.

    • by ipquickly (1562169) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:45PM (#31837662) Homepage

      I hope this device will be as successful as the zune.

      It's running zunes os after-all.

    • Re:Way to go (Score:4, Interesting)

      by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:52PM (#31837796)

      In all fairness, though, they'll probably sell like hotcakes in the niche market they're designed for. I just don't see it as a very big market.

      I'm guessing that niche is "parents who can be convinced by advertising that they're buying what their kids want".

    • Re:Way to go (Score:5, Insightful)

      by painandgreed (692585) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:02PM (#31837964)

      "These phones have no downloadable apps, no games, not even a calendar. They're not meant to be expandable smart phones; instead very good messaging phones."

      Nice job, Microsoft. Way to ignore the growing trends in favor of your own way. After all, you certainly know better than those lousy consumers.

      In all fairness, though, they'll probably sell like hotcakes in the niche market they're designed for. I just don't see it as a very big market.

      Actually, it's probably a good move for the same reasons that the iPhone was a good move. Smartphones, while growing still aren't the majority of the market. Lots of people want "just a phone". Kids, however, want messaging, but the parents that pay for it probably don't want smart phone fees or for that matter, connection to the internet. There was a story on /. just yesterday by a parent asking how to filter his teenage kids access to the internet. It seems like a perfectly valid market that is probably no more niche than smartphones. Not everybody needs or wants a smart phone, and I'm sure there are plenty of people who want a messaging phone. I think the real test will be if it followed good design and they are indeed "very good messaging phones."

    • Re:Way to go (Score:5, Interesting)

      by McBeer (714119) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:55PM (#31838842) Homepage

      "These phones have no downloadable apps, no games, not even a calendar. They're not meant to be expandable smart phones; instead very good messaging phones."

      Nice job, Microsoft. Way to ignore the growing trends in favor of your own way. After all, you certainly know better than those lousy consumers.

      I was talking to my 23 year old sister about this phone. Here's an interesting snippet

      [17:02] Sister: it looks cool
      [17:02] Sister: too bad it's not sprint
      [17:03] Me: Yeah. It'll be interesting to see what price details emerge this month
      [17:03] Sister: it's cool you don't have to get apps for it, the features are built in
      [17:03] Me: haha all the nerds are holding that against it
      [17:04] Sister: and the camera capability is good!
      [17:04] Sister: i don't want to have to hunt around for 20 apps
      [17:04] Sister: it would work right away

      Not only did she not care about the lack of app store, she saw it as a bonus. It looks like MSFT was definitely listening to a consumer segment when they designed the phone. It will be interesting to see just how many people like my sister there are out there.

  • Seriously? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by jimmyhat3939 (931746) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:35PM (#31837492) Homepage

    I just can't take these products seriously. Instead of this niche marketing, microsoft needs to focus on something with broad appeal. There's a reason iPhone beat them in that space, and this is exactly it.

    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      microsoft needs to focus on something with broad appeal. There's a reason iPhone beat them in that space, and this is exactly it.

      It appeals to broads?

    • I think it's so much worse than that. With the Zune/HD and and it's new phone offerings Microsoft is trying to out-Apple Apple and they are terrible at it. Not only do they come out with hardware that is a generation behind what Apple has out in the market:
      - big old iPod (a few years later) big old Zune
      - skinny iPod (a few years later) skinny Zune
      - iPod touch (a couple of years later) Zune HD
      - iPhone (a couple of years later) this thing

      Not only are they late to market copycats but they don't execute
    • by cybrthng (22291)

      Microsoft provides the OS and Cloud Computing infrastructure. Sharp provides the phone.

      I personally thing this is pretty cool. Its not the best device by any means but it has great utility and if verizon can sell an affordable plan this phone makes perfect sense for people who want twitter, facebook, zune and the excellent camera features.

      This also puts MS head over heals above every other smartphone company out there in terms of cloud computing and infrastructure. Instead of downloading "an app for that"

  • It has all the costs to make of any other smartphone, because OS wise it is a smartphone. So it can't be cheaper than any other smartphone.

    If anything, its more expensive because there is no app-related revenue.

    So how does Microsoft expect to compete? Just lose more money at something?

    • by Rockoon (1252108) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:03PM (#31837980)
      I suspect that since it has no downloadable apps, that "bleeding edge" isnt really a concern.

      Only needs a CPU good enough to run the included apps. Probably dont even need a GPU. With application control, you also get reliable antialiasing (only fonts that look good included) so perhaps a regular 100DPI display may be good enough (iphones and recent ipods sport a 200DPI display, if I am not mistaken,) the battery probably wont need to be nearly as good, the memory probably doesnt need to be nearly as fast either...

      There are probably lots of ways to cut costs here without sacrificing much beyond that initial sacrifice: no downloadable apps

      The iphone reportedly costs ~$200 in parts
  • by rsborg (111459) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:37PM (#31837522) Homepage

    Whatever they do now seems to be a pale caricature of reality... why is this the case?
    Were they always this clueless?

    It's sad... so much talent.

    • by copponex (13876) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:26PM (#31838368) Homepage

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Principle [wikipedia.org] ...in a hierarchy, members are promoted so long as they work competently. Sooner or later they are promoted to a position at which they are no longer competent (their "level of incompetence"), and there they remain, being unable to earn further promotions. This principle can be modeled and has theoretical validity. Peter's Corollary states that "in time, every post tends to be occupied by an employee who is incompetent to carry out his duties" and adds that "work is accomplished by those employees who have not yet reached their level of incompetence".

      In the corporate world especially, upper level politics and kickbacks and alliances always end up chucking creativity out the door, grinding it into the pavement, and writing off as an R&D expense as it's scooped into the dust bin.

      Google avoids this by letting employees work on their own pet projects that get picked up for major development as they gain popularity in their internal culture, which seems to be quite good at picking winners. Apple has so far escaped this only because it's run like North Korea. There's one maniacal prick and marketing genius at the top of the food chain, and everyone else is meaningless.

    • by fermion (181285)
      It is because they are often late to the party. Nearly every Apple product, at least since the iPod mini, has has designer packaging that seriously encourages the unpacking video. Such videos provides tons of cheap advertising. As a company that is trying to be more environmentally friendly, OEM packaging would be both cheaper and make greenpeace happier, but at a large loss of the package fetish crowd.

      That MS is finally tapping into some of it's tens of billion of assets to make a pretty product seems

    • by Blakey Rat (99501)

      What are you referring to, specifically? Would you say the same thing about, say, Motorola had they introduced a phone with this featureset and form-factor?

      I mean, I agree that I don't find this announcement compelling, but then again I'm also not the audience for the phone.

      I'm also all for griping about Microsoft, but at least give us some substance! What about this announcement are we supposed to hate, exactly?

  • Potential... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by DevStar (943486) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:38PM (#31837524)
    When I first saw the phones I thought "loser". I was comparing it to the iPhone, Nexus One, WP7, etc...

    But then it became more apparent that it's competing against the EnV and the Rage. What Verizon calls MultiMedia phones. It will likely be on the lower priced data plan (or maybe they'll make one between teh $10 and $30/month package). Given a choice between an EnV or a Kin, the Kin is an easy choice. If MS were to clean up the multimedia phone space at Verizon, I think you'll suddenly begin to see a new market emerge. Although it's a surprisingly tough market, because I think a lot of it hinges on the data center and carrier integration.
    Watch how this plays out. I think it possibly flops, but could be iPhone like huge, but to a totally different market.

    • The only thing I can see is the lack of flexibility that kills it. Right now Twitter and Facebook are all the rage but a few years ago, it was myspace. The smartphones are flexible so that you can just get another app. What will happen to the users of this phone if the social networks change?
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by wjousts (1529427)

        What will happen to the users of this phone if the social networks change?

        Not a problem, most kids will trade in their phones every couple of years of so anyway.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by trcooper (18794)

      You're right. There is a lot more to the mobile phone market than the high-end smart phone. Compared to any smart phone these two devices can't compete. But against the EnV, Backflip, etc I'd say they're more than interesting. I think the low to mid end of the mobile phone market is under-served with quality devices, there's a plethora of phones out there, but very few that are any good.

      If these phones are executed well, they could definitely fill a gap in the market.

      What I find most interesting about t

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by nine-times (778537)

      Yeah, I actually kind of like this, coming from Microsoft.

      Here's the thing: for the past decade or so, I haven't been a huge fan of Microsoft. They're big and lumbering and sloppy. One of the things I've commented on here before is how Microsoft's design philosophy is different from Apple's, and how Apple's is basically better. The short version: Apple's first release of a device is relatively simple, but very well put together and targeted toward specific uses and maybe even a specific audience, and th

  • Kin dle? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by AtlantaSteve (965777)

    We know that Apple protects their branding to a ridiculous degree... essentially arguing that any name with an "i" in front it threatens their intellectual property. So I wonder if Amazon will have anything to say about this new product? If I saw a news story about the "Kin Two", and the headline didn't qualify it as a Microsoft thing, my first assumption would be that it's a new version of Amazon's ebook reader.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      Maybe they should swap the 'Kin' and 'One' around. Rename it the "One Kin". People wont know what you are 'Two Kin' about. Just wait for the 'Four Kin'.

      Maybe then we can have the Microsoft 'fucking' and 'wanking' phones.

      • Two things. And I call them
        Kin One and Kin Two.
        These Things will not bite you.
        They want to have fun."
        Then, out of the box
        Came Kin Two and Kin One

        And Sally and I
        Did not know what to do.
        So we had to take hand
        Of Kin One and Kin Two.
        We took them in our hand.
        But our fish said, "No! No!
        Those Things should not be
        In this house! Make them go!
        "They should not be here
        When your mother is not!
        Put them out! Put them out!"
        Said the fish in the pot.

    • by sznupi (719324)

      Now you have kindled my dreams for a product from somebody named "it".

  • Kin? Pink? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Rantastic (583764) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:41PM (#31837590) Journal

    Is it just me, or do the marketing folks at Microsoft have some serious deficiencies when it comes to naming products? Lets not forget The Monad Shell.

    I guess this is what happens when they try to be creative. Otherwise everything is called either Windows, Business, or Office Something.

  • yupyup (Score:5, Informative)

    by Pojut (1027544) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:44PM (#31837642) Homepage
  • Sounds 'kin rubbish.

    Sorry it had to be done.
    • by Andy Smith (55346)

      Sorry, modded this the wrong way (down instead of up) so have to reply to clear my mod. Thought comment was funny :-)

  • Kin (Score:2, Funny)

    by tverbeek (457094)

    "Kin"?

    Well, at least it'll sell well in Appalachia, enabling teens to keep track of which cousins are dating which.

  • IM Support (Score:5, Interesting)

    by greg1104 (461138) <gsmith@gregsmith.com> on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @02:56PM (#31837868) Homepage

    It looks like the bet they're making is that including Facebook and Twitter support is a complete replacement for the traditional IM client. I'm not so sure that decision is so terrible from a marketing perspective. The trend I'm seeing is that old school IM clients just aren't as popular among less serious users nowadays; I get Facebook messages from all sorts of people I know would never bother getting a "real" IM account, or who have never figured out they already have one via Gmail.

    Ultimately the real limitations of this phone aren't going to apparent until the matching data plan is announced. How much it will cost to download all the Twilight ringtones and background images that will obviously be introduced for this phone? These are the important questions. So far we already know that updates from some sites are put into 15 minute batches [engadget.com], presumably to same on network bandwidth, which doesn't bode well.

    • Re:IM Support (Score:5, Interesting)

      by fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:09PM (#31838102) Journal
      The slightly more pessimistic hypothesis would be that IM is basically SMS; but without the length restrictions and billed as "data" rather than "text". Leaving IM out probably increases the phone's attractiveness to carriers.

      Particularly if they are trying to move this thing as a cheaper "teen" alternative to the smartphone proper(just as the sidekick was the cheaper alternative to the blackberry), they'll need carrier cooperation in the form of somewhat cheaper data plans. Leaving out IM, and thus padding SMS usage, might well be the quasi-hidden subsidy that they need to make that happen.
  • Get it? (well they hope people get it)....
  • I know I'm a geek and I'm by no way saying I can do better (I can't) but that just looks like something a nerd designed to look cool. It just doesn't work. A lot of PC software / hardware suffers from this and probably because designers like Macs so PC companies get left with geeky looking things. Imo, MS has never designed an OS that you enjoy looking at and aside from a few of their mice, none of their hardware ever looks that nice either.

    I really don't like that whole idea of the app screen being larg
    • by McBeer (714119)

      I really don't like that whole idea of the app screen being larger than the screen and you end up sliding things about to see stuff. They need to start paying some serious cash to steal designers away from Apple or something.

      You do realize that once you have a sufficient number of apps, the iPhone app panel works just like the Kin one right?

      They just don't get it, imo. The egg shaped one looks like a iPhone and Blackberry's retarded child. To be fair the rectangular one isn't too bad but nothing says cool about it.

      I've read quite a few articles on this thing. Interestingly, the Kin 1 (egg shaped one), is getting all the good press and the Kin 2 (candy bar) is being derided as just another blah blah smart phone form factor. While I too am more attracted to the Kin 2 form factor, I think MS really did their homework and the Kin 1 will prove to be more popular among the devices target audience. Somebo

      • It has to do better than previous Windows mobile phones (can't possibly do worse) but this is by far no threat to the iPhone or even Android, imo. We shall see but if I were a teen I'd more likely to think this is about as cool as my dad rapping.
        • by Blakey Rat (99501)

          It has to do better than previous Windows mobile phones (can't possibly do worse) but this is by far no threat to the iPhone or even Android, imo.

          It's not intended to be. It's clearly not in the same market as the iPhone and Android are-- when Microsoft announces their Windows Mobile 7 phones, *then* you can compare them to iPhone and Android.

          The Kin here is more like a Sidekick, that's who they're competing with.

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The Kin One has a 5-Megapixel camera, while the Kin Two’s 8-Megapixel camera can shoot 720p HD video.

    Awesome! I can’t wait for the homemade porn.

    * For values of “teen” equaling 18 or 19, of course.

  • Azure Data Grab (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Yuioup (452151) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:15PM (#31838218)

    From what I could understand from the presentation, everything goes through Azure.

    Which means that all the posts you make go through Microsoft's data centers before they get posted on facebook/twitter/whatever.

    This is all just a scheme for Microsoft to gather user data and to monetize on it. A data-grab scheme, plain and simple.

    Tag this: Do Not Want

    Y

    • Re:Azure Data Grab (Score:4, Interesting)

      by cybrthng (22291) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:59PM (#31838902) Journal

      How does drivel like this get modded up? Microsoft has one of the best privacy policies of any of the cloud computing systems, probably better than the telco that most "Smart phone" users have for their contracts. IE, it isn't the azure/cloud platform you have to worry about.

    • I don't know, after reading about these phones, one of the most appealing features sounds like the ability to have all your data available online.

      One of the things I really want out of a phone is to not have my data stuck on my phone. Like I love the idea of Google Voice-- being able to have all my SMS and voicemail messages getting forwarded/stored in my email. I also like the idea that, when you take a picture with your camera, it automatically gets uploaded to a Flickr/Picasa sort of service.

      I want m

  • Just 2 Weeks after Nielsen reports that Smartphones are Projected to Overtake Feature Phones Next Year [marketingcharts.com], Microsoft goes big for the Feature Phone market.

    Who's running things over there?

  • ...someone finds a good way to reflash it with Meego (or Android).
  • It's only a small thing (no pun intended) but this form factor (1 [pcmag.com], 2 [pcmag.com]) is, if nothing else, pretty different from everything else we've seen so far. I doubt it'll be enough to save the line, but at least someone, somewhere is trying new stuff.

    • by tekrat (242117)

      I could accept the small one if it was also... say... a Tamogatchi. If you could hang the phone on a necklace, it's screen was on all the time, and it could show your mood. Or display your horoscope. Or if it could do *anything*. But it doesn't seem to be for anything at all. It's too small to use for the web realistically, and while I'm sure kids can twitter with it, there are better phones in that mindspace.

  • And Microsoft still can't make a decent product if their lives depended upon it. I fail to understand how a company that always hires "the best and the brightest" can make such lousy decisions. Seriously, what middle manager or marketing suit looked at this turd and said "killer! -- this is hot!"

    Unless this phone is going to be DIRT CHEAP (as in free with a new contract), it's doomed to fail. Kids do not want "low end", they want what they see the celebrities using on MTV. And Rihanna isn't going to be usin

  • by Animats (122034) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @03:23PM (#31838324) Homepage

    It's sort of like a Blackberry for young people. Or the Hasbro/Tiger Clueless Organizer [hasbro.com], version 2.0.

    It's about time for the toy companies to move into the phone space.

  • From TFA:

    Onboard storage, however, is not the point, according to Microsoft executives. In fact, both phones serve as a portal to the cloud, storing photos, videos and other data on the network, rather than on the phone. Neither phone, for example, has an SD card slot, executives said.

    "Thousands of customers walk into our stores every month and ask us, how do I get photos off this phone?" said John Harrobin, Verizon's vice president of digital media.

    So now they'll ask: "How do I get photos off 'the clou

  • so where's the corporate backlash from Adobe threatening lawsuits to get on Microsoft devices?
  • According to a Microsoft official the phones are named Kin because they 'knit together...

    Knit together, huh? C'mere you!

    (sounds of a Microsoft offical being violent slapped about)

    OK, what does it mean again?

    kindred spirits.'

    Oh dear, oh dear.

    (more sounds of a Microsoft offical being violent slapped about)

    Are you trying to amuse me? Does "kin" seem funny to you?

    It says "you turn me on" inside the package

    (blank stare)

    OK. Rocko! Slab! Take this guy outside and give him the extended lesson.

  • by dpbsmith (263124) on Tuesday April 13, 2010 @04:30PM (#31839274) Homepage

    "Onboard storage, however, is not the point, according to Microsoft executives. In fact, both phones serve as a portal to the cloud, storing photos, videos and other data on the network, rather than on the phone. Neither phone, for example, has an SD card slot, executives said. 'Thousands of customers walk into our stores every month and ask us, how do I get photos off this phone?' said John Harrobin, Verizon's vice president of digital media.'"

    Oooh, "portal to the cloud." Well, then, that answers all criticism.

    The younger generation just totally gets putting their pictures in the cloud. Verizon will transmit and store them for free. The cloud storage will be accessible to, compatible with, and interoperable with with their friends' iPhones. The risque pictures they upload will be secure and private. The concept of storing them in an SD card is way too technical for the target market to comprehend. Not.

  • Don't they see the obvious joke you can make with the name?

    Microsoft have some of the most talentless branding and marketing people in the world.

    They call their OS Windows (it has windows) and their Office suite Office.

    I'm amazed this phone isn't called Microsoft Child Phone or something.

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