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Barnes & Noble's Nook, Reviewed 260

Posted by timothy
from the 2d-mover dept.
harrymcc writes "Barnes & Noble's Nook — the most significant e-reader since Amazon's original Kindle — hits B&N's retail stores today. I've published an extensive review of the device, which is also the first e-reader to run Google's Android OS: It's an interesting and capable gadget in many ways, but the interface — which is sluggish and somewhat quirky — isn't polished enough to render it a Kindle killer."
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Barnes & Noble's Nook, Reviewed

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  • Killer (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Zerak-Tul (1654309) on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:22AM (#30351182)
    What e-books need is not a kindle-killer but a dead-tree-killer.
    • Re:Killer (Score:5, Funny)

      by Tellarin (444097) on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:43AM (#30351298) Homepage Journal

      ... a dead-tree-killer.

      Oh no! We're doomed. How do you kill a tree zombie? They don't have heads to shoot at.

      Aaaahhhhh

  • by RobotRunAmok (595286) on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:26AM (#30351202)

    Just need something that forces Amazon to keep innovating and keep pricing competitive.

    Thanks, B&N!

  • WiFi (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Gopal.V (532678) on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:28AM (#30351206) Homepage Journal

    Speaking as someone not living in the US ... and hence out of the AT&T whispernet, the fact that this can work over WiFi is a huge plus.

    I'd totally pay 250 US for it, just for kicks. Especially if they'd publish something like a bird watcher's guide, which where I really miss having a ton of searchable content, but without the bulk to carry around.

    • Re:WiFi (Score:5, Informative)

      by teg (97890) on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:38AM (#30351256) Homepage

      Speaking as someone not living in the US ... and hence out of the AT&T whispernet, the fact that this can work over WiFi is a huge plus.

      I live in Norway, and my Kindle works just fine with the cell network here for downloading books etc.

    • by Nerdfest (867930)
      Is is still true that you can't view PDF or other open format documents on the Kindle (without sending it through the company)? If the Kindle can't, anything that can is a Kindle killer in my mind. Amazingly, even the Sony seems to be way more open than the Kindle.
      • by Enry (630)

        The recent software update for the Kindle apparently allows it to read PDF natively, though I've never had a use for it.

        As for open document formats, it supports MOBI, TXT...aww heck, it's right on the first page of the review! Go read it.

      • by Zerth (26112)

        The Kindle DX reads PDFs natively, the kindle 2 supposedly just got updated to also do so, but I haven't tried yet. Either way, you can convert it on your own with free software instead of sending it in.

        All of them can read txt, html, mobi, even jpg and a bunch of formats I never use.

        Just remember to back up your books to a computer so they can't 1984 you.

    • by tgd (2822)

      I think a bird watcher guide probably works better with color ...

    • by Brandee07 (964634)

      Except that you're not allowed to buy new content on the nook when outside of the US. Read, sure, but not get anything new.

      See the "Traveling with nook" subheading [barnesandnoble.com]

  • by erroneus (253617) on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:35AM (#30351246) Homepage

    Perhaps it is my slashdot bias, but the story about Kindles having books removed from readers' machines still strikes a sour chord with me. I recognize that most consumers don't know a thing about and many don't care. I don't see much difference between book burning and book deleting. To me the reasons, are irrelevant. Abuse will always emerge when opportunity is given.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:44AM (#30351304)

      Bingo. No Kindle for me. Ever.

      I did want one, and saw myself inevitably getting one when the price reached a reasonable altitude.

      But they wrote me off with that stunt. Now any reader I do settle on must establish to my satisfaction that it does not have that "feature".

    • by slim (1652) <john AT hartnup DOT net> on Monday December 07, 2009 @08:08AM (#30351406) Homepage

      It was a bad decision on Amazon's part, but it was one they made good on in my opinion:

      http://www.crunchgear.com/2009/09/04/big-amazon-will-give-you-back-your-copies-if-1984-annotations-wont-be-sent-into-the-chute/ [crunchgear.com]

      I'm not keen on buying DRM'd e-books. But the fact is that in this case, Amazon showed itself to be capable of treating customers right, and of making the right reparations when standards slip.

      • by erroneus (253617) on Monday December 07, 2009 @08:34AM (#30351494) Homepage

        And yet they did not issue a firmware update that would remove the easily abused feature.

        When rights are able to be taken away, they are no longer rights -- they are privileges. I'd just as soon buy an actual book.

        Apologizing for behavior is one thing. Making sure it never happens again is quite another.

        With all this DRM everywhere, all we are really ensuring is that 1000 years from now, no one will know who we were or what we did.In the short term, we are losing public domain. In the long, we are losing our identity.

        • In the short term, we are losing public domain. In the long, we are losing our identity.

          Until you find a way to make that show up on next quarter's balance sheet... no-one making the decisions gives a rat's ass.

        • by slim (1652)

          Apologizing for behavior is one thing. Making sure it never happens again is quite another.

          It wasn't just an apology, but a better-for-like replacement. That is, people bought an unlicensed product, and were eventually given a licensed replacement.

          Making sure it never happens again? It's plain to see that Amazon were smarting from the negative publicity. For entirely self serving reasons, they won't repeat that.

          I'll repeat though - I don't think the 1984 episode shows Amazon in a particularly bad light. However I don't think buying DRM'd books is a wise move for most consumers.

          • by jimicus (737525)

            Apologizing for behavior is one thing. Making sure it never happens again is quite another.

            It wasn't just an apology, but a better-for-like replacement. That is, people bought an unlicensed product, and were eventually given a licensed replacement.

            The book in question (Nineteen Eighty-Four, George Orwell) has expired copyright and is now in the public domain in the US (where all this happened). How exactly is it possible to get an "unlicensed" public domain work?

            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by Mr2001 (90979)

              Are you sure? Wikipedia disagrees [wikipedia.org]:

              Nineteen Eighty-Four will not enter the US public domain until 2044,[13] and in the European Union until 2020, although it is in the public domain in Canada,[14] Russia,[15] and Australia.[16]

            • by ckaminski (82854)
              Um, 1984 was published. In the 70's Congress granted everything written after 1916 (or some such) an automatic 75 year copyright extension. 1984 isn't going to fall into the public domain until 2025 (75 years after Orwell's death).
        • by Yvan256 (722131)

          all we are really ensuring is that 1000 years from now, no one will know who we were or what we did.

          That's ok, the Flargnorgs don't really care for Shakespeare anyway.

        • by Enry (630)

          If 1984 were in the public domain, you may have a point. It isn't, so you don't.

          Public domain books can be loaded on to the Kindle (and other e-readers) outside of the bookstore and it would likely be difficult for Amazon to know or remove books loaded in that manner.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by lymond01 (314120)

          I'd mod you up but you're already at +5. My concern is that Amazon's example reminded people that with everything electronic, data can be changed with or without our permission. Tough for someone to walk into your house and remove your book without at least some defense on your part. But if a company can just click a button and remove your property without your permission or knowledge, we're walking right into Orwell's 1984, only we won't need thousands of people editing newspapers...just a small team to

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Stray7Xi (698337)

          And yet they did not issue a firmware update that would remove the easily abused feature.

          The fault is the law, not Amazon. The copyright status of this book is confusing enough that an honest mistake was made by a publisher that sold an unlicensed book on Amazon. The extreme penalties associated with this mistake could have killed off the whole kindle product line with a massive judgment.

          Patching this "feature" out would be pointless at this point, because it can always be patched back in if they ever want to recall again. The customers were rightfully upset so Amazon had to make a policy.

    • by professorguy (1108737) on Monday December 07, 2009 @09:12AM (#30351678)
      A book offers permanence. Books are created so the only infrastructure required to receive the information within is your brain. And how can you get rid of books authorities no longer like? Well, because of the light infrastructure requirements, you CAN'T. No book burning has ever deleted an entire work from the culture.

      But if a corporation decides to "burn" an e-reader book, can they? They sure CAN! And the book will be gone with no chance of ever discovering an unburnt copy.

      Sorry, no. The function I want is PERMANENCE. That cannot be built into an e-reader.
      • A book offers permanence. Books are created so the only infrastructure required to receive the information within is your brain. And how can you get rid of books authorities no longer like? Well, because of the light infrastructure requirements, you CAN'T. No book burning has ever deleted an entire work from the culture.

        But if a corporation decides to "burn" an e-reader book, can they? They sure CAN! And the book will be gone with no chance of ever discovering an unburnt copy.

        Sorry, no. The function I want is PERMANENCE. That cannot be built into an e-reader.

        Actually... If you're worried about permanence... I'd go for an (open) electronic format over the printed page...

        Much easier to throw a PDF on the interwebs and ensure that it lives forever. Or copy it to a couple dozen USB keys or SD cards and scatter them around. Or email it to hundreds of people. Or encrypt the thing so authorities can't touch it. Or print out a few dozen copies. Or burn it to a CD/DVD. Throw a copy on your iPod Touch, on your iPhone, on your Blackberry.

        Yeah, DRM is bad. And Ama

      • by Nikkos (544004) on Monday December 07, 2009 @10:32AM (#30352698) Homepage

        "No book burning has ever deleted an entire work from the culture"

        That we know of.

      • by tepples (727027) <{tepples} {at} {gmail.com}> on Monday December 07, 2009 @10:45AM (#30352842) Homepage Journal

        No book burning has ever deleted an entire work from the culture.

        Are you sure no works died with the Library of Alexandria [wikipedia.org]?

      • by russotto (537200)

        No book burning has ever deleted an entire work from the culture.

        How would you know?

      • Broken Record (Score:3, Interesting)

        by fm6 (162816)

        I am so tired of hearing "e-readers will never replace books" arguments, as if it were an all-or-nothing thing. I can well imagine stone carvers makers the same "permanence" argument against books.

        E-readers still can't do a lot of what books do, but so what? Half the books I read, I read once, then give them away or return them to the library. For these, an e-reader is perfectly fine. And as the technology advances, a physical book will have fewer and fewer advantages.

        Frankly, I think all this strident rant

    • Perhaps it is my slashdot bias, but the story about Kindles having books removed from readers' machines still strikes a sour chord with me. I recognize that most consumers don't know a thing about and many don't care. I don't see much difference between book burning and book deleting. To me the reasons, are irrelevant. Abuse will always emerge when opportunity is given.

      Don't be so sure the public are blissfully ignorant. I'm pretty sure it made mainstream press. Plus, this isn't exactly the kind of thing you get as an impulse buy, so people will look into it a bit more closely.

    • Perhaps it is my slashdot bias, but the story about Kindles having books removed from readers' machines still strikes a sour chord with me. I recognize that most consumers don't know a thing about and many don't care. I don't see much difference between book burning and book deleting. To me the reasons, are irrelevant. Abuse will always emerge when opportunity is given.

      One of the reasons I ordered a nook this season, as opposed to a Kindle, is that you don't really need to go through Barnes & Noble if you don't want to. The WiFi will let you connect wirelessly without their cell network... The SD cardslot will let you load up whatever you want... And the thing reads EPUB and PDF documents natively.

  • Kindle killer? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by jotaeleemeese (303437) on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:35AM (#30351248) Homepage Journal

    Amazon's reluctance to let the gadget out of the US market earlier makes the Kindle just another e-book reader, it has no iconic status that would warrant the "killer" adjective for any competitors, who are competing against it in equal footing pretty much everywhere.

    • Re:Kindle killer? (Score:4, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward on Monday December 07, 2009 @07:59AM (#30351368)

      Try clicking on the rather prominent "Live outside the US" link. The Kindle has been available outside the US with international 3G internet support for months now.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      Personally I'm not so sure that it is the belated international availability which dwarfs the iconic status of the Kindle. The iPhone too was only available for the US market for a long while. Certainly, the unavailability of a product doesn't help its popularity, but many other factors (not all imputable to Amazon itself), contribute to the somewhat limited extent to which people around the world have reacted to the "revolution" which Amazon was hoping to bring with its device.
  • Damnit, I had no idea there was that much demand, and that this thing won't be available til January. I guess that kills my plans for my mom's "Atheist People Give Presents" day gift. Maybe a gift certificate and a picture of the Nook...
  • will this be available to rest of us mere mortals living outside the US (like Europe)?

    i can get the kindle and the sony reader so would i have to wait forever for this?

    • will this be available to rest of us mere mortals living outside the US (like Europe)?

      i can get the kindle and the sony reader so would i have to wait forever for this?

      At the moment, everyone is waiting forever. If you were to order one today you wouldn't see it until sometime in January.

      At the moment, the nook is limited to US customers. I don't think its 3G will even roam outside the US. You could always use the Wi-Fi... But I'm not sure how well that would work.

  • by your_neighbor (1193249) on Monday December 07, 2009 @08:05AM (#30351394)

    Which reads any .pdf .djvu .younameit, e-ink, etc?
    They can not be the ultimate quality, but they will put some fire in competition! Then prices will begin to be fair!

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by bazorg (911295)
      not with 13", but there is a similar thing on ebuyer.com. £120, no DRM.
    • by tepples (727027)
      Perhaps once the essential patents on e-ink expire in a decade or two. Otherwise, Customs will just stop them at the border.
  • by The Cisco Kid (31490) on Monday December 07, 2009 @08:06AM (#30351398)

    The review mentions AT&T 3G, but I couldn't find any mention of whether a new AT&T contract is required to buy the device at the stated price. If it is, then fsck that. If it isn't, then 'meh'. Its still pretty expensive. Wait for v 2.0.

    Also, if one plugs its USB in, does it appear as 'USB storage', that one can copy PDF's to and be able to read them? Or is one required to use its proprietary software on a proprietary platform to load only special files with DRM?

    And how about on wifi? Can one use any sort of standard protocol (ssh, ftp, smb) to copy PDF's in (or out) and/or can it navigate to an arbitrary URL and download a PDF, or does it only support the device accessing company-specified websites to 'buy' books?

    Bottom line - Mandatory contract bad. Mandatory proprietary software bad.

    • by CrosseyedPainless (27978) on Monday December 07, 2009 @09:16AM (#30351698) Homepage

      From the FAQ: No. There is no charge for your nook's wireless features. You do not need a contract.

      As for the file transmisson: B&N is short on details. Since the OS on the nook is Android 1.5, I'm guessing someone will find a way to hack the firmware, even if B&N isn't helping.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by zaq1xsw2cde9 (608119) *
      The Nook is the same as the Kindle in that respect. The contract for service belongs to the device and is lifetime no cost for the owner of the e-book. The 3G company doesn't even know who you are to charge you. That contract is handled between the manufacturer and the 3G company OEM.
    • by Ephemeriis (315124) on Monday December 07, 2009 @09:36AM (#30351956) Homepage

      The review mentions AT&T 3G, but I couldn't find any mention of whether a new AT&T contract is required to buy the device at the stated price. If it is, then fsck that. If it isn't, then 'meh'. Its still pretty expensive. Wait for v 2.0.

      No new contract, no bills at all. The 3G is free, just like the Kindle's.

      Also, if one plugs its USB in, does it appear as 'USB storage', that one can copy PDF's to and be able to read them? Or is one required to use its proprietary software on a proprietary platform to load only special files with DRM?

      No idea how it works with USB as I don't have one yet, but it does read SD cards... So you could always just throw your files on an SD card to avoid whatever software they think you should be using.

      It will read PDFs and EPUB documents - both of which are more open than what Barnes & Noble is using now. Barnes & Noble has indicated that they plan to move their entire ebook store over to EPUB eventually.

      And how about on wifi? Can one use any sort of standard protocol (ssh, ftp, smb) to copy PDF's in (or out) and/or can it navigate to an arbitrary URL and download a PDF, or does it only support the device accessing company-specified websites to 'buy' books?

      Again, I can't say because I don't have one yet... But it sounds like the WiFi is fairly limited at the moment. There is no web browser and I don't believe you can transfer anything wirelessly... Except for maybe accessing the B&N bookstore over WiFi.

      Bottom line - Mandatory contract bad. Mandatory proprietary software bad.

      The reason I chose a nook instead of a Kindle is the relative openness of the platform. With the SD cards and support for PDF and EPUB format, I figure I can use this thing with basically any content I want - even stuff Barnes & Noble doesn't sell or support. And with the Wi-Fi I can probably maintain my connectivity even if B&N kills the 3G for some reason. And the user-replaceable battery means I don't have to go to great lengths just because the battery is old and flaky - unlike the Kindle.

    • It makes extensive mention of BN's support for epub.

  • A Kindle killer:? (Score:3, Informative)

    by intheshelter (906917) on Monday December 07, 2009 @08:26AM (#30351456)

    The whole phrasse Kindle killer evokes some epic struggle to knock off the top dog in the market. Right now the iPhone/iPod touch appears to be the number 1 ebook reader. Meanwhile Amazon is afraid to release sales numbers for the Kindle because it would show it has been a disappointing seller.

    I think the Kindle is a good idea, but for a single use device with a very high price it is not going to make any inroads into the market.

  • Awesome. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by purpledinoz (573045) on Monday December 07, 2009 @08:29AM (#30351468)
    I'm glad that more e-readers are starting to come out. I hope to get one after a couple more generations and a huge price cut. Plastic Logic is coming out with an e-reader soon too. Yay for competition.
  • by Phoenix (2762) on Monday December 07, 2009 @08:37AM (#30351504)

    The Kindle does have one disadvantage that is making me give the Nook a stronger look.

    PDF's.

    I buy a lot of Role Playing materials from Steve Jackson Games' "e23" site. They are in very high quality PDF documents and something that can display them without having to lug around a large, heavy, and massively power hungry laptop is a god send.

    However, even though I legally own a copy of the PDF, Amazon refused to convert the PDF into a Kindle Ready file due to (as I was informed) copyright issues.

    The Nook supports PDF out of the box and the internal file storage as well as the expansion slot gives me the room for all of the PDF's that I have.

    So while it might not be a Kindle Killer, it has some features that put it close enough to the Kindle to make it a worthwhile contender.

    • by slim (1652) <john AT hartnup DOT net> on Monday December 07, 2009 @09:07AM (#30351648) Homepage

      Have you considered the Foxit eSlick.

      http://www.foxitsoftware.com/ebook/ [foxitsoftware.com]

      I haven't tried one myself. I'm a bit dubious about the way it's *all* PDF (reflowable text seems better for many kinds of writing). But if PDF works for you, Foxit are among the best at it. Their software PDF viewer is certainly better than Adobe's.

    • by Psx29 (538840)
      I don't own a kindle, but Amazon just added PDF support in the latest kindle models via a firmware update. There's no pan-and-zoom support though so it squishes the pdf page down to fit the screen which kind of sucks.
      • by Brandee07 (964634)

        On the 6" Kindle2 screen, it squishes it way too small to be read, but you can rotate it to landscape, and it displayed half the page at a time, in landscape mode. So, a page that's normally 8" wide is squished to 6", and you have to turn the page to get to the bottom of the column, and turn the page back to get to the top of the second column, but it works, and is readable.

        I've loaded my Kindle with a bunch of D&D sourcebooks. I still prefer the hardbacks for use around the game table, but the copies o

    • Kindle PDF Support (Score:5, Informative)

      by swg101 (571879) on Monday December 07, 2009 @09:19AM (#30351758)
      There was new firmware recently released (Amazon release notes [amazon.com]) that adds, among other things like longer battery life, native PDF reader support to the Kindle 2. (Note, the Kindle DX had native PDF support since it was released months ago.)
    • The Kindle does have one disadvantage that is making me give the Nook a stronger look.

      PDF's.

      I buy a lot of Role Playing materials from Steve Jackson Games' "e23" site. They are in very high quality PDF documents and something that can display them without having to lug around a large, heavy, and massively power hungry laptop is a god send.

      However, even though I legally own a copy of the PDF, Amazon refused to convert the PDF into a Kindle Ready file due to (as I was informed) copyright issues.

      The Nook supports PDF out of the box and the internal file storage as well as the expansion slot gives me the room for all of the PDF's that I have.

      So while it might not be a Kindle Killer, it has some features that put it close enough to the Kindle to make it a worthwhile contender.

      I understand that the Kindle has recently added full support for PDFs... I'm not sure how this differs from the not-full support they had before... But your PDFs might work now. Maybe. Possibly.

      But this is one of the main reasons I ordered a nook this season, instead of a Kindle. Full, native support for PDFs and an SD card slot mean that I can put pretty much anything on it that I want to. Even things that aren't already in a supported format can easily be converted to PDFs.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by tool462 (677306)

      I picked up a netbook not too long ago that has proved quite suited to the task. Granted, it does consume more power and weigh more than a Kindle/Nook/eReader, but the numbers aren't bad.

      Weight: 3 lbs. I have plain old dead-tree books that are this heavy.
      Battery life: 6-11 hours of actual use. The 6 hours is with the screen brightness all the way up, Wifi on, and doing enough work to keep the CPU and hard drives cranking. I treat it kind of like a cell phone, use it all day, plug it in to charge overni

  • Why buy either? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by dfdashh (1060546) on Monday December 07, 2009 @09:33AM (#30351908)
    Could someone please explain the advantage of a dedicated e-book reader? I don't understand why I would buy either when I can get a netbook for $50 more (at worst) that can read both PDFs and Amazon e-books. Is it the battery life of these things, or is the hardware form factor really nice? I don't know.
    • Re:Why buy either? (Score:4, Insightful)

      by slim (1652) <john AT hartnup DOT net> on Monday December 07, 2009 @10:00AM (#30352248) Homepage

      Definitely e-ink is the feature that makes these special.

        - Much more readable, because it reflects rather than transmits light
        - Readable in bright conditions, for the same reason
        - Low power drain when showing static pages

      Ironically, in a way, e-ink isn't good for much *except* e-readers (yet) because of the cost, the fact it's monochrome and the poor refresh rate.

    • Re:Why buy either? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Ephemeriis (315124) on Monday December 07, 2009 @10:06AM (#30352336) Homepage

      Could someone please explain the advantage of a dedicated e-book reader? I don't understand why I would buy either when I can get a netbook for $50 more (at worst) that can read both PDFs and Amazon e-books. Is it the battery life of these things, or is the hardware form factor really nice? I don't know.

      The battery life is generally rated in days, as opposed to hours.

      They are typically shaped more like a book or slate, and less like a laptop. A netbook is going to have the keyboard sticking out of the bottom and the screen is oriented horizontally rather than vertically.

      The e-ink screen is more like a printed page, and easier to read under similar lighting conditions. LCDs typically have problems with bright light, and can cause eye strain after prolonged reading.

      Both the Kindle and the nook offer free 3G to purchase ebooks, which your netbook probably wouldn't.

      If you don't read much and you just want something that can display a PDF, obviously an ebook reader isn't going to be necessary. Just throw it at your computer.

      But if you read for recreation, an ebook reader can be very nice. It allows you to condense a huge book into a very small and portable form factor. It allows you to carry a large selection of books with you. It allows you to quickly and easily purchase more books without having to locate the nearest bookstore. And it is designed to allow you to keep reading for hour after hour, day after day.

    • by Lifyre (960576)

      No back light. It is easier on the eyes than a netbook screen, no eye strain or anything, and the battery lasts for days (I recharge about twice a month and read on it every day) not hours. The form factor varies but my PRS-505 if roughly the size of a VERY thin paperback.

    • by tepples (727027)
      LCDs work well in indoor environments with moderate lighting. In low light, looking at an LCD is like looking into a lightbulb, and outdoors, your eyes are so adjusted to the environment that the screen appears too dark, unless you crank the backlight to max and (yes) kill your battery. The resolution on an e-ink screen also appears to be much higher than 1024x600.
    • by jimicus (737525)

      I haven't the remotest idea.

      Myself, I carry around more than enough in the way of expensive toys as it is. The idea of another expensive toy to get lost, stolen, make me a more attractive target for a mugging or my car a more attractive target for being broken into does Not Appeal.

      I've never seen a real book crash. I've never seen a real book that needs to be charged up. I've never seen a real book that will be utterly ruined if it gets even slightly damp. (Damaged, yes. Ruined, not unless you drop the

  • B&N are quite lame.

    First, they call publicly, for a beta test of an Android reader. They use Android users, primarily with G1s, to test their new reader software.

    Then, after a while, they transition to their lame Nook, proceed with months and months of testing on that platform, then release the Nook.

    Where is the software for Android phones? When I emailed, they seemed to think the concept was quite bizarre.

    They have software for WM6, and other phones, but when THEY USE READERS TO DEVEL SOFTWARE FOR TH

  • Is there a professional quality readers available?

    To me, a professional reader need significant mark up and free hand note taking, using a stylus, not tiny keyboard. The iRex iLiad tried providing these features, but their product is rumored to be kinda "not done". Will anyone like sony ever introduce such a reader?

  • Having a kindle and a tendency of reading more then the average geek, due to my Ph.D. work (I read about a Robert Jordon book and a half a day between work-school-pleasure reading, not considering websites and email). I love my kindle for pleasure reading, but find that it does not do a good job for academic or professional reading where one has to cite the work. The form factor works for me, where a DX would be a little too large. I can do about four page flips per second with my kindle, which isn't too

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