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A Dual-Screen 10.1" Laptop In Time For the Holidays 104

Posted by kdawson
from the netbook-with-a-two-page-spread dept.
JoshuaInNippon writes "Japanese computer manufacture Kohjinsha has announced that it will begin selling a 10.1" dual-screen laptop on Dec. 11 — in Japan only. While it is not the first dual-screen laptop, a title claimed by the monstrous 17" Lenovo Thinkpad W700ds series, the Kohjinsha sure looks much more portable and stylish. The Thinkpad's extra screen pulls out slightly from one side for about a 40% increase on its display, whereas on the Kohjinsha's two full separate screens spread out symmetrically from the center. While specs are admittedly lower than the Thinkpad, the DZ series certainly wins on cost. The starting price will be ¥79,800, about $900, in Japan (exporters will likely mark that price up slightly), compared with the Thinkpad at well over $2,000. Kohjinsha says the laptop is great for working on 'large business documents' (e.g. excessively wide spreadsheets), or watching videos while surfing the Web, which is likely what most users will be doing with it. The timing and the price certainly make the Kohjinsha DZ series a tempting toy idea for holiday giving — perhaps to oneself."
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A Dual-Screen 10.1" Laptop In Time For the Holidays

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  • More than a gimmick? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by kjart (941720) on Saturday November 28, 2009 @05:29PM (#30256852)

    While I obviously understand not every product is tailored to my needs, I can't really see much of a need for this. The netbook level tech specs likely mean doing more than one thing at once would be painful. Plus, if you actually need a lot of screen real estate, you could likely get a larger laptop with more pixels (and more power under the hood) for around the same money.

    Anyone around here think they would want one? Actually curious to hear about the appeal.

  • by Shakrai (717556) on Saturday November 28, 2009 @05:39PM (#30256896) Journal

    Sorry for the mildly off-topic post, but wow! I wonder what kind of battery life that beast gets? Does it have a portable nuclear reactor on board or is the battery reduced to being useful only for trips across the room to switch outlets?

  • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Saturday November 28, 2009 @05:44PM (#30256910)

    I only find that dual screens are useful in two situations:

    1) When you have an app that needs a whole screen to work. A video editor would be an example. They often wish to use a dedicated screen as a preview screen. As such you want a second monitor to dedicate to that, regardless of size of your first one.

    2) When you need more screen real estate than you can get in a single monitor, or for a cheaper price than large single monitors. This is by far the most common. You want more room, but a 30" screen is too much money so you get 2 22" or 24" screens instead. The whole reason is more room.

    Ya well, in this case a larger laptop, or external screen (or both) would seem to be the way to go. I'm not seeing the second monitor as useful.

    There's also the fact that the divide is right down the center. In dual monitor setups I've encountered (including mine at work) one monitor is directly in front of the user and is the primary screen, the other is off to the side and contains the less important stuff. I've never seen one where both monitors were in front and the split was centered. That would be very noticeable and very annoying.

    To me, this looks like nothing more than a gimmick.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 28, 2009 @06:03PM (#30256986)

    "In dual monitor setups I've encountered (including mine at work) one monitor is directly in front of the user and is the primary screen, the other is off to the side and contains the less important stuff. I've never seen one where both monitors were in front and the split was centered. That would be very noticeable and very annoying."

    My experience is exactly the opposite. I've never seen anyone using the setup you describe. This laptop would work perfectly for me.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday November 28, 2009 @06:43PM (#30257162)

    So, then every time I get into a class at school, or set up in a coffee shop, I unpack the CPU brick, unfold the keyboard, set up two monitors with stands and connect 4 cables, and then do the process in reverse about 6 times per day.

    I might as well be bringing my own chair as well.

    I wouldn't do this - but I would totally use that single-piece laptop. It would be very productive for my uses.
     

  • by reporter (666905) on Saturday November 28, 2009 @06:46PM (#30257186) Homepage
    The price for the laptop made by Kohjinsha (based in Japan) is $900. The price for a laptop having similar features and made by Lenovo (based in China) is $2000. This pricing is quite surprising.

    All Lenovo laptops are made in China, and the Kohjinsha laptop is made in Japan. How can a Japanese product be cheaper than a Chinese product, given that the cost of labor in Japan is much higher than the cost of labor in China?

    The Kohjinsha product is the 2nd instance of such unusual pricing.

    In 2008, a quick scan at Frys (the local electronics store) shows that all Fujitsu laptops are made in Japan. Most Sony laptops are made in China. (Only Sony laptops costing more than $2200 are made in Japan). What is interesting is that the made-in-Japan Fujitsu laptops have prices and features that are similar to the prices and the features of the made-in-China Sony laptops.

    What is happening here? How can certain Japanese manufacturers (like Kohjinsha and Fujitsu) possibly price their products so low, keep their high-value manufacturing in Japan, yet still be profitable? What is the secret formula?

  • by ZankerH (1401751) on Saturday November 28, 2009 @06:56PM (#30257244)
    A manufacture process than uses robots instead of children (than need to sleep 5 hours a day and eat every once in a while) for repetitive tasks, I'm guessing.
  • 1280x1024 = 5:4 = never happening.

    However, there are off-the-shelf 1366x768 10.1" panels they could've shoved in there.

    That said, my main machine is a ThinkPad T60p 15.0" with a 2048x1536 panel retrofitted.

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