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Some Claim Android App Store Worse Than iPhone's 289

Posted by kdawson
from the scylla-meet-charybdis dept.
eldavojohn writes "If you think the iPhone app store is the only mobile game store suffering an exodus, some game publishers claim Android's app store isn't much better, for a different reason — it doesn't generate much revenue. In fact, French game developer Gameloft (which owes 13% of its profits to iPhone game sales), said, 'We have significantly cut our investment in Android platform, just like... many others. It is not as neatly done as on the iPhone. Google has not been very good to entice customers to actually buy products. On Android nobody is making significant revenue. We are selling 400 times more games on iPhone than on Android.' So the trade-off seems to be more sales but an annoying approval process, versus a lack of sales promotions and no annoyance around approval. It seems that those in it for money will opt for iPhone, and those in it for distribution will opt for Android. Or maybe someone will get it right one of these days?"
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Some Claim Android App Store Worse Than iPhone's

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  • by seanadams.com (463190) * on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:33PM (#30176616) Homepage

    It seems that those in it for money and distribution will opt for iPhone, and those in it for neither will opt for Android.

    FTFY. But seriously, did these developers make ANY effort to size the market on each platform before making their decision?

    I can totally understand why some developers have problems the iphone approval requirements. But its positively daft to make a business decision on only that basis and then be surprised later to discover that your prospective customers simply do not care. Surprise! They prefer a unified, tightly controlled, non-sucky smartphone experience even at the expense of some interesting apps.

    Personally I'd go a step further. I would give up EVERY SINGLE THIRD PARTY APP not to have to go back to the Treo that my iPhone replaced. Maybe Android has come a long way since then but for the first time I am actually happy with my phone and not motivated enough to find out.

    • by Hadlock (143607) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:46PM (#30176844) Homepage Journal

      I think the bigger reality isn't that "the iphone app store sucks because they're so restrictive", but "the iphone app store sucks because they won't give us an unfair advantage by allowing us to break rules so we sell more apps than our competitors". I think the Android app store doesn't sell as many units simply because it's newer and simply doesn't have the same installed base as the iPhone/ipod touch. Politicizing things by bringing the apple "standards board" into things only muddies the issue.

      • by bobcat7677 (561727) on Friday November 20, 2009 @07:11PM (#30179220) Homepage
        Yes, well said. Based on the sketchy news reports I have seen, there are at least 30 million Iphones out there now while there are only about 1 million android devices so far. I think that gap will start to narrow with the introduction of the Droid phone and Verizon's accompanying ad campaigns. But dev for android should be considered investment in the future at this point, not a source of instant riches.
      • by Lemmy Caution (8378) on Friday November 20, 2009 @08:22PM (#30180108) Homepage

        The Android app store sells less because it is dominated by a culture of "free" (as in beer) and the Apple app store is not. I run Android and wish it would do well, but if I were designing games, I would not target the Android if my model was to make money by selling games. If I were Zynga, Playfish, or Playdom, however, using the "Freemium" model, I'd be all over the Android. Look at Ian Bogost's article describing the ridiculousness of people asking for refunds for 99 cent games [gamasutra.com] as an indication of how hard it is to make money selling games on mobile platforms.

        (Gamers, look at the future of gaming: it is Farmville, and you created it through your cheapness, greed, and immaturity.)

    • by eln (21727) on Friday November 20, 2009 @05:17PM (#30177454) Homepage
      Exactly. A mobile phone, even a smart phone, is far more of an appliance (or a game console) than a standard computer is, and you will lose if you try to treat it like a computer. Apple understands this and offers a uniform experience with a tightly controlled OS and tightly controlled applications available through a simple and easy to use app store interface. Developers only have to develop for one set of hardware requirements, and can fully take advantage of that piece of hardware.

      Android, on the other hand, is an open platform designed to work on a wide variety of devices. This means that developers have to design their apps for the lowest common denominator of all these devices, or create different versions for each device depending on its capabilities. This means they can't effectively take advantage of advanced features or greater available resources in the high end phones, because they'll lose out on all of the potential customers with the lower end models. This is much more akin to developing for PCs rather than consoles.

      If people saw their phones as personal computers, Android's model would be more successful. However, it doesn't seem to fit in with how most people use their phones. It will find purchase among the small segment of the market that enjoys endlessly tinkering with their gadgets, or philosophically oppose closed designs enough to forgo the iPhone, but the majority of the population will continue to flock to the iPhone.
      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by GooberToo (74388)

        Android, on the other hand, is an open platform designed to work on a wide variety of devices. This means that developers have to design their apps for the lowest common denominator of all these devices, or create different versions for each device depending on its capabilities. This means they can't effectively take advantage of advanced features or greater available resources in the high end phones, because they'll lose out on all of the potential customers with the lower end models. This is much more akin to developing for PCs rather than consoles.

        Wow. I don't know where to begin with that because most of it is not true.

        Android is an open platform and can work on a variety of devices, but the framework (known as Android) which sits between the device and the application is abstracted. This means if you use the provided SDK, you don't care what the nature of the device is. Its not a problem, its a big, big plus. It is, however, a serious problem for Apple and their iPhone/iPod. Interestingly, what you deem to be a negative for Android is factually a h

      • by mjwx (966435) on Saturday November 21, 2009 @04:02AM (#30182718)

        Exactly. A mobile phone, even a smart phone, is far more of an appliance (or a game console) than a standard computer is

        This is exactly what Android is trying to change.

        You may not be old enough to remember but I am. About 20 years ago the PC market was the same as the mobile market is today, Hardware, Software and service were tightly integrated and came from a single provider (this is called Vertical Integration), then along came this upstart company founded by a Harvard drop-out called Microsoft who had developed this product called Windows 3.1 and then had the audacity to sell the software separate from the hardware, the software also ran on generic hardware so multiple vendors could produce hardware and the OS provided a consistent framework for applications. Win 3.1 opened up the hardware market, killed the vertical integrators and created competition. Even Linux owe's its success to the market created by Win 3.1. Apple may have made the first popular PC but it was Windows 3.1 that put the PC on every desk in the world.

        I'm sure the Apple II fanboys said the same thing about Win 3.1 as the iphone fanboys are saying about Android, that different hardware would make the platform too inconsistent. It didn't turn out that way with Win 3.1. An OS can sit on a variety of hardware and maintain consistency, Linux and Windows are living proof of this. Android is attempting to separate the vertical integration monopolies of the mobile phone market and frankly, its about damn time as this needs to happen to the mobile phone/service industries.

        We are already seeing the phone HW market start to open up as non-phone technology companies like Acer, Asus and Nvidia are producing mobile phones running Android, not to mention non phone products like the Barnes and Noble "Nook" ebook reader.

    • by GooberToo (74388) on Friday November 20, 2009 @05:52PM (#30178058)

      The thing most hurting the Android store is piracy. Period. Even worse, many users, for the cost of $0.99, of which .60 went to the developer, demand $20k/year level support and if they don't get it, bad mouth the hell out of the developer and the application. Hell, most of the time users just leave shitty comments on the market and refuse to even report a bug. Any developer or user who has spent much time on the market will verify this fact.

      Simple fact - pirates are killing the android market. Period. Entitled users are number two. Number three is Google's complete indifference.

      Also, to the masses, please stop with the idiocy of, "get rich", comments and, "size the market". The FACTS are, the market is already plenty big for many developers to make a living - if only that. This isn't about getting rich. The market size is plenty big - and growing very fast. Period. The problem is, everyone is stealing the applications and its making it impossible for developers to make any money what so ever. This is why more and more (vast majority now) are ONLY developing adware based applications because even with extreme piracy they are able to make buck. This in turn is creating backlash for developers - but pirates have left absolutely no other options for developers. Because of pirates, the only options are, abandon the platform or try with adware applications.

      If you like the Android platform, kick the holy shit out of any pirates you know because THEY are destroying the entire platform. Without professional developers, with the ability to make a living, or hell, even work for greater than third world wages, by in large the platform is going to remain mired in third rate applications and will likely cause the platform to die before it can ever reach "developer critical mass."

      Piracy is so extreme on Android because of all the platforms, its by far the easiest to pirate apps on. Made worse is Google's lie that would provide copy protection. To date, they have not. Google's current "copy protection" is the same concept as the infamous "evil bit" for IP. Bluntly, its all but useless and Google seems more than content to be flipped with developers.

      This means the only rescue for Android is to lock down the platform - not likely - or for people the kick, every pirate they know, in the nuts for destroying what was to be the an excellent mobile platform. I already know two developers how have been forced to leave the platform. A third isn't far away. Simply put - pirates suck.

      • by Cederic (9623)

        Ah, so that's why it's possible to make money on Windows, OSX, Linux, consoles, the iPhone, Palm, Series60: they have no piracy.

        "Everyone" is not stealing the applications. I don't know a single Android phone user that's stolen applications. (I don't know any that have downloaded any commercially sold apps without paying for them either.)

        Speaking personally, while I haven't paid for a single downloaded app on my Android phone, I've also only installed applications released for free.

        Incidentally I do know an

        • by GooberToo (74388) on Friday November 20, 2009 @06:15PM (#30178448)

          "Everyone" is not stealing the applications. I don't know a single Android phone user that's stolen applications. (I don't know any that have downloaded any commercially sold apps without paying for them either.)

          That's called anecdotal. It doesn't prove anything. I've spoken with several developers (those that have left and are leaving) who have "phone home" in their apps. Thousands of installs and less than twenty sales. Its repeated time and time again. The FACTS are, piracy is killing Android. Period. Granted, what I'm saying is also anecdotal, but at least it has facts to support the position - unlike yours.

          There are over a dozen web sites which specialize in ONLY pirating android applications. Some of those sites track download stats for the illegal files. Contrasting those downloads against sales typically leaves the developer both furious and sick. The simple FACT is, piracy is killing android.

          Why do you think so many adware applications are being developed?!? Its the only fucking way to make money on the platform. Your refusal to accept fact doesn't change the facts.

          • Re: (Score:2, Troll)

            by Cederic (9623)

            My anecdote is sufficient to disprove your "everyone", and casts doubts on the credibility of your other statements.

            I think adware applications are being developed because there are so few 'for pay' apps that do something you can't download a 'free' app (from the market) for that most users seek the free app first and don't expect to pay.

            It may indeed be the only fucking way to make money on the platform, but your inability to accurately state the facts doesn't mean that piracy is the only (or even the main

          • by mjwx (966435) on Saturday November 21, 2009 @04:14AM (#30182758)

            Granted, what I'm saying is also anecdotal

            This is cancelled out by this.

            That's called anecdotal. It doesn't prove anything

            You seem to throw around the word FACT a lot but you don't actually provide a single fact, link or corroborating evidence. Nothing, no link, not even a dubious link, all you've done is capitalise the word "fact" in the hopes of making your anecdotal tripe sound authoritative and frankly it doesn't work.

            Allow me to explain why a US$0.99 app is not successful on the Android marketplace, because the functionality provided by the vast majority of $0.99 applications is barely worth the price tag. This isn't the killer though, the killer is that there is for every 1 US$0.99 application there are 3 free applications that provide the same functionality. If you want to look at success in the Android marketplace look at things like the exchange client "Touchdown" by Nitrodesk. This application is US$25 to buy but they are targeting business users (who are more likely to pay as its easier an they have more disposable currency) and they provide a product that is vastly superior to anything else on the market.

            Here this thing, I'm going to say it again "and they provide a product that is vastly superior to anything else on the market". This is the best way to get ahead in any market, be better, be worth the price you're asking as the majority of paid applications are not worth the price they are asking. But it seems easier to blame the bogeyman called piracy then admit that your program is not worth what you're asking for it. The simple fact is that Android users don't really need to pirate anything as there is almost always a free app that provides the same level of functionality.

            Your refusal to accept fact doesn't change the facts.

            Just because you call your opinions fact doesn't make them facts.

  • Perhaps .. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by OzPeter (195038) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:35PM (#30176630)

    .. at the moment the difference in sales is due to market segmentation based on who is buying each type of phone?

    If you are a trendy game player you are buying the iPhone and games for it, but if you are an Android user you care less for games and more about being "free" ??

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by TooMuchToDo (882796)
      Or you care more about functionality and apps that actually do something, not games. Locale, which takes action based on your location, is free. Weather apps are mostly free. The only apps I've looked at I might consider paying for? And RDP app and an app that lets me use the camera as a scanner to make PDFs. You don't need to buy apps when there are tons of solid apps that are free.
      • by Knara (9377)
        The somewhat relevant xkcd strip [xkcd.com] for this idea.
      • by Deosyne (92713)

        Bingo. Despite having far less total apps in the Android Marketplace than in the iTunes store, and despite the fact that the Android Marketplace layout kinda sucks (seriously guys, having limited categorization, limited filtering, and basic search in a collection of 10,000+ that can only be browsed on a phone is a pretty dick move), I have had no problem with finding free apps that do exactly what I want. I've paid for extra functionality in a couple of apps that go above and beyond (both pro versions of ap

    • Re:Perhaps .. (Score:5, Informative)

      by mjihad (686196) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:43PM (#30176792) Homepage

      .. at the moment the difference in sales is due to market segmentation based on who is buying each type of phone?

      If you are a trendy game player you are buying the iPhone and games for it, but if you are an Android user you care less for games and more about being "free" ??

      Actually, there are two big differences between the Android market and the iPhone app store, business wise: there are less Android phones out there than iPhones and iPod Touches and the Android Market does not have paid apps available in every country [google.com], including Canada, Sweden, Finland, Mexico, Belgium, Greece, Ireland, South Korea, China, Brazil, India and Russia.

      • there are less Android phones out there than iPhones and iPod Touches

        That is the case and is a factor, probably 30x more iPhone devices (20-30 million? Probably many more by now). So then how to account for 400x greater sales?

        and the Android Market does not have paid apps available in every country, including Canada, Sweden, Finland, Mexico, Belgium, Greece, Ireland, South Korea, China, Brazil, India and Russia.

        Look at sales figures for any application and I assure you the lot of those countries combine

    • Of all the people I know that either have an iphone or an android-based phone, none of them are really interested in games.

      It would seem to me that games in general just aren't profitable on these phones. What people seem to want are other type apps, such as location-based, be it a restaurant finder, people finder, or some other type.

      And come to think of it, riding the train, I RARELY see anyone playing any type of game. They're usually involved in some facebook/myspace/twitter goings on or jut listen

    • by tepples (727027) <tepples@gmaiBLUEl.com minus berry> on Friday November 20, 2009 @05:40PM (#30177832) Homepage Journal

      If you are a trendy game player you are buying the iPhone and games for it, but if you are an Android user you care less for games and more about being "free" ??

      Another thing to consider: iPhone is to Android phone as iPod Touch is to what?

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Cederic (9623)

        Nokia n800?
        Archos PMP?
        How about an Android netbook, an Android tablet device, the other 87 Android phones currently in development or already released?

  • by Kenja (541830) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:35PM (#30176640)
    But I still say eat which ever you personally like.
  • Market share (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Gudeldar (705128) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:36PM (#30176658)
    Perhaps Android apps don't sell as well as iPhone apps is because there are a LOT less [appleinsider.com] Android phones than iPhones?
    • Re:Market share (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mlts (1038732) * on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:49PM (#30176930)

      There are a lot fewer Android phones than iPhones, plus there is one thing people forget:

      If you distribute code for Apple's platform, you have to go through the App Store. If you want to distribute code for Windows Mobile and Android, you can just send the user a file. The Android and WM app stores are more of clearinghouses (similar to Handango), as opposed to a central choke point.

      So, factoring out pirated apps, Apple's Store shows essentially all the apps that go from developers to customers. Other platforms, the app stores might be used for commercial distribution, but other apps don't need to be. So, even if Android had the same marketshare as Apple's ther app store would always show fewer apps because people are free to use other ways to get from them to their users.

      • by JohnFen (1641097)

        If you want to distribute code for Windows Mobile and Android, you can just send the user a file.

        Precisely! This is a huge win, and although I'm sure that iPhone apps outsell Android simply because of the difference in user base sizes, to compare sales from the two stores is comparing apples and oranges.

      • So, even if Android had the same marketshare as Apple's ther app store would always show fewer apps because people are free to use other ways to get from them to their users.

        Even beyond that, Apple has the advantage of having iTunes, and not just an app store. I know, I know, some people really hate iTunes, but that's not my point here.

        My point is that iTunes provides a single access point that lets you do several things. It lets you organize your music, movies, podcasts, etc., and sync them to your phone in a configurable manner. It's also the program that's used to manage some aspects of your phone and install software updates. So because of those things, if you have an

        • I think other cell phone manufacturers could learn from this. Give your customers a very easy integrated experience for buying, installing, and syncing applications, music and video, and keeping all of it up to date.

          Umm...every crappy verizon phone I have seen in the last 6 years has had this functionality. They replace the manufacturer interface with their own, disable all of the features, and then sell you back functions along with ringtones and games. You just click on them in some interface and the price gets tacked onto your bill, much to the chagrin of many parents (at least the app store doesn't regularly charge $5.99 for a game).

          Other providers have had similar functions for quite a while (although usuall

      • It maybe a choke point if there are fees--and Handango has none (yes, they do take more revenue in their sharing model, but then again their apps are more expensive on average)... And with a inconsistent approval process--mainly for updating apps (new apps are ok it appears), and a ceiling point before you get paid ($250), well, as a choke point? If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck...
      • well. good theory, but i don't know of any 3rd party dist mechanism that has more than a handful of apps. and almost everything is allowed on android market, even apps that required rooted (aka jail-broken) phones. there are a few notable exceptions, but they account for a very, very small number of the total.

    • Are you saying that the article does not take that into account? That it ignored a bit of facts in order to push out it's own opinions??

      OUTRAGEOUS!
    • I wonder if Apple's 'late' release of a public SDK and the app store (compared to the initial release of the iPhone) actually significantly helped the app store. Instead of opening it up when there's only a tiny bit of market share (with anyone who starts early being driven away by the lack of customers), they opened it up when there was demand (quite literally) for apps and enough of a market share to support it. And it seems to have worked out very, very well for them and the developers.

      Maybe Apple's orig

  • by Nerdfest (867930) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:39PM (#30176698)
    I would think the vastly greater sales would be related to the larger number of iPhones on the street, and the length of time the app store has been around, but that's just me. I would also guess that Apple users would buy more games than Android users, just based on my generalized, uninformed perceptions of the user base.
    • by Em Ellel (523581)

      The point is that developers feel like they are not making as much money on Android and that it is not worth investing in.

      I would say that it does not necessarily has to be a bad thing.

      Basically those who are using it to make money by selling useless apps (I mean how many fart apps do you need? I argue the number is less than one!) would fare much better in Apple land. Android is, at least so far, not being bought by the same audience that buys iPhones - the Android audience is not going to be excited by a

  • by system1111 (1527561) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:41PM (#30176732)
    With the Droid out and the recent marketing push in terms of Verizon dollars behind it I think this might look a little different down the road a bit.
    • by rsborg (111459)

      With the Droid out and the recent marketing push in terms of Verizon dollars behind it I think this might look a little different down the road a bit.

      I will bet you the numbers don't change significantly. If anything, this is the 2nd start of Google's serious entry into the smartphone market and the first serious push for Andriod devices cross-marketing. Apple is surely taking them seriously.

      That said, I predict nothing much will happen market-share-wise in 2,3 even 6 months... other than perhaps more nail

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by WiiVault (1039946)
      Considering the tact Apple has shown becoming the most important player in mobiles in 2 years I would be willing to take the bet that they will be fine even without Verizon. Android will thrive, but the iPhone is gonna be just fine.
  • by 140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:41PM (#30176738) Journal
    Right now the install base of iPhone is much bigger than Droid's. So the initial sales will be slower. But it will pick up eventually if the platform is a hit. When they come back they might find that their niche has been already filled by their competitor.
    • That's basically what I wanted to write. The first to mark his turf will have it quite a bit easier to prevail when everyone starts to scramble when the sales pick up. But hey, if they want to leave the field, more power to them. The more established studios leave the 'droid as uninteresting, the higher the chance that a new studio can settle in and increase the competition fold. And that in turn can only be good for the customer.

  • Droid Owner (Score:4, Informative)

    by explosivejared (1186049) * <hagan.jared@NOSPAM.gmail.com> on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:43PM (#30176784)
    I just recently converted to android. Maybe I'm just late to the game, and we're on the tail end of this exodus now. My first impression, having been on the platform for a week, is that there has been almost no development, especially in making games, for android that is anywhere comparable to the iphone. I would posit that this "exodus" is made up. The market is still nowhere near as developed as the app store. Any discussion about a comparison of the two models is premature at best.
    • Re:Droid Owner (Score:5, Interesting)

      by dagamer34 (1012833) on Friday November 20, 2009 @05:02PM (#30177154)
      Ditto. Even the crappier looking iPhone apps are FAR more pleasing to the eye than some of the best Android apps because there's a standardized UI that just about every iPhone app must use (creating your own UI for iPhone apps is often discouraged in the iPhone developer docs unless it's a game).
    • Re:Droid Owner (Score:4, Interesting)

      by blackmonday (607916) on Friday November 20, 2009 @06:18PM (#30178492) Homepage
      Also, Android phones don't (yet) have dedicated graphics chips, AFAIK. I just got the Samsung Moment, and winced when I ran the included Bejeweled demo. It's one of my favorite games on iPhone, but it's a total joke on Android. You won't find AAA titles on Android, because they can't be run. Don't expect Trench Run or Tiger Woods on the Android or Palm Pre, because it's not a possibility at this moment.

      Actually, it's worse for the Pre, because it actually has the same CPU and Graphics hardware as the 3GS, yet the hardware currently does nothing. There's currently no way for a game dev to access it. Lame.
  • What the developers do not get is that apple's approval process drives the store. Exclusivity adds value, and makes customers like the store more.

    • What the developers do not get is that apple's approval process drives the store. Exclusivity adds value, and makes customers like the store more.

      As if the masses have the slightest idea of the store's restrictions.

  • Maybe if I actually saw an app worth paying for, in the android market, I'd buy it. Most apps are pretty dumb. How many fart, soundboard, and girly apps are there? There's a handful that I probably should make a donation to, like connectbot, gmote, andftp, and cyanogen, but other than I've not seen much that even looks worth $1. A huge amount of us jumped to android since it's a relatively open platform. Those of us that are used to open platforms are not used to paying for much. They do specifically
  • Hey eldavojohn, spare us this false header?

    "It is not as neatly done as on the iPhone. Google has not been very good to entice customers to actually buy products. On Android nobody is making significant revenue," Rochefort said.

    Fact: It's worse. It's not as neatly done != It isn't much better.

  • by realmolo (574068) on Friday November 20, 2009 @04:57PM (#30177082)

    Practically speaking, the public has only become aware of the Android-based phones with the introduction of the Motorola Droid phone. And haven't they only been advertising that for a month or so?

    Android has only *barely* entered the market. Nobody has the phones, so nobody can buy apps.

  • by maiken2051 (956611) * on Friday November 20, 2009 @05:03PM (#30177172)
    CNN Tech article on developing for Android: http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/11/17/android.wired/index.html [cnn.com] Will developers get stuck building for the "least common denominator" of 'droid phones? Or develop for specific models / versions / capabilities? Throw in phone vendor and carrier OS customizations and the Android app marketplace could get hard to live with...
  • First:

    We are selling 400 times more games on iPhone than on Android.

    Then:

    It seems that those in it for money will opt for iPhone, and those in it for distribution will opt for Android.

    I'm not sure this is the best example. Gameloft is both selling more games *and* earning more profit on the itunes store, right? I haven't seen any ads for the android app store, either.

    I understand the walled-garden that is the itunes app store, but I don't understand what advantages come from developing solely for android. Less consumer exposure vs open structure?

    If the typical slashdot comment is to be believed, the average joe demands ssh, skype, google voice, and voice-to-text. From that per

  • Hopefully Palm will get this one right as their App Catalog evolves. Palm is trying to walk a fine line by supporting both self-signed apps outside the App Catalog and official, reviewed apps inside the catalog. It will be interesting to see if the developers begin looking at webOS as a viable distribution platform. I think the benefit is that, like the iPhone, webOS customers (Pre & Pixi) will be willing to pay for apps. The downside, of course, is that the self-signed apps will have to develop their o
    • by Hast (24833)

      Honestly, and kind of sadly, I think Palm is already "dead company walking".

      They haven't managed to get their SDK out yet. They haven't launched in all of Europe yet. I'm sure that they'll be able to get a small market but they'll have a really hard time growing beyond the fringe. Consider that Palm is already a pretty small company and they have to take on all the other phone manufacturers together (since they run Android, besides Nokia and Apple).

      Palm's problem is that while Nokia and Apple are hugely suc

  • I'm not surprised: on the Canadian app store you can't actually buy anything. At all. As in "there's no way for them to take your money, so all you can pick a free apps." I wonder how many other countries are in this state.

  • The android market is a lot newer and there are many fewer devices sold. Complaining about not having as much revenue through that stream is asinine. Article author is a whiner and has nothing to contribute but bile. Either that or this is just a thinly veiled bit of Apple propaganda. Either way: BBBBOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!

  • You mean an app market whose sole audience is made up of people who have already resigned themselves to shelling out more money than other people will generate more revenue? Mind. Blown.

  • There are multiple different approaches to solving a problem and the choice to do one, the other or both is left up to individual entities in the marketplace and can be based on ease of use and revenue.

    This is a pretty awesome concept.

    I hope both continue so we can evolve the best of both.

  • Actually, I think the approval process is decent - at least as a consumer. I get age-appropriate ratings (sort of), cheap apps, and generally don't have many issues with lockup and the like.

  • Seriously, gaming on phones is and probably always will be shit and it's hard to compete with thousands of shitty apps flooding either app store.

    I would really like to develop an Android app but I feel I might as well do it for free than think I will get money. I'd be better off developing a decent internet app that can be used via a PC or phone.
  • by AP31R0N (723649)

    Weasel words. 1 would be some.

    i hate the iPhone interface, the way it dials a number when i touch it, instead of just selecting it. Therefore: Some IT professionals hate the iPhone interface.... WHAT IS APPLE DOING WRONG??? OH TEH NOES!

    Maybe we can be forgiving of early generation products. How long has Android selling vs. iPhone? What is an appropriate grace period?

    Can we get some numbers? Maybe constrain/express them in a meaningful way.

    Earlier this week there was headline saying Bing gained 10% mark

  • by GrantRobertson (973370) on Friday November 20, 2009 @06:20PM (#30178528) Homepage Journal
    It is because the only way to find apps is to browse them on the darned phone. Don't get me wrong, I love my Droid. But a 3.5" diagonal screen is not the place I want to be sorting through thousands of almost identical task list apps and trying to find the best one. I hesitate to buy any apps because I never know if I have actually looked through the entire list. We need a real web site with better access to reviews and an easier way to down-rank all those apps that essentially spam. I have run into at least 20 apps with identical descriptions but different names and icons. When Google cleans up that mess, then maybe I will be willing to spend some money in there.
  • by EnglishTim (9662) on Friday November 20, 2009 @07:10PM (#30179208)

    The original app store for the Android is pretty poor. Apparently it's improved with Android 2.0, but the one that came on my HTC hero doesn't feature screenshots, for example. The search is extremely limited and all you get to see of the app is the icon and a small paragraph of text. Sometimes you can find out a little more from the user comments, but it's not much to make a decision from.

    Having said that, if you don't like an app you can uninstall it and get a refund with 24 hours.

    My guess is that with a better featured store (screenshots, a better search etc) the android store will start to become profitable as more and more handsets appear. Next year I imagine you'll get Android handsets for less than £100 on Pay-As-You-Go contracts. Once handsets at that kind of price start appearing, the user base will *explode*. Also, I imagine sometime next year you'll be able to make payments directly through your phone bill rather than needing a google checkout account. Even though the average user won't spend as much on the store as the average iPhone user would (as they won't have as much money) the sheer volume of purchases will start to make a difference.

  • by CharlyFoxtrot (1607527) on Friday November 20, 2009 @07:37PM (#30179590)

    This guy [paulgraham.com] says it best : "So programmers continue to develop iPhone apps, even though Apple continues to maltreat them. [...] Can anything break this cycle? No device I've seen so far could. Palm and RIM haven't a hope. The only credible contender is Android. But Android is an orphan; Google doesn't really care about it, not the way Apple cares about the iPhone. Apple cares about the iPhone the way Google cares about search."

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