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No Linux IdeaPad For Lenovo's US Customers 188

Posted by timothy
from the too-bad-because-I-want-one dept.
narramissic writes "When Lenovo's new IdeaPad 'S' series netbooks hit stores in October, U.S. buyers will only be given one option: Windows XP on the IdeaPad S10 (making it not so much a series as a single offering). Meanwhile, people in most markets Lenovo serves, including Singapore, China and the U.K., will be offered both of the company's new IdeaPad netbooks (the S10, which has 10.2-inch screen, and the S9, which has an 8.9-inch screen), and the choice of either Microsoft Windows XP or a Linux OS. Before you start feeling too sorry for yourself, consider the price tag: the S10 will sell for £319 (US$629) in the U.K., but in the U.S. the starting price is $399." Liliputing (a cool site for anyone interested in sub-notebook computing) has posted a few bits on the IdeaPad, including some short videos.
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No Linux IdeaPad For Lenovo's US Customers

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  • XP (Score:5, Funny)

    by porcupine8 (816071) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:25PM (#24503183) Journal
    Reading through the summary, at first I thought that the fact that it was only available with XP was supposed to be a good thing. Then I got further and realized it was being compared to XP + Linux, not XP + Vista.
    • by BronsCon (927697)

      Wait a minute... and Apple fangirl that's rooting for linux?

      I think I'm in love... too bad I'm already engaged.

  • not linux (Score:4, Funny)

    by larry bagina (561269) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:26PM (#24503203) Journal
    it's "Linpus Linux Lite". Based on the name alone, I say good riddance.
  • by Chris Pimlott (16212) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:26PM (#24503205)

    I foresee a black market in Linux system restore discs...

  • by loteck (533317) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:30PM (#24503253) Homepage
    Until Dell releases their E series netbooks [slashdot.org]. The specs are promising (please include a 6-cell battery), they look very good, and the price point reflects a "race to the bottom" that I fear Asus's EeePC series has forgotten.

    Of course then the dual cores will start coming out later in the year, but I doubt I can wait until then, especially at these prices.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by timothy (36799)

      I'm in the same (or a similar) boat, awaiting the rising tide ...

      The used-to-be-ThinkPad background of the Lenovo laptop line is probably the biggest reason this one is high on the list -- I'm hoping the keyboard on this will be more tolerable than for instance that on the early EEE (I will *not* tempt fate to say it could hardly be worse); the Acer Aspire One is very similarly specced / priced, but I read yesterday that Acer's planning to sell a 6-cell battery for (ack!) $130, which strikes me as a poor ba

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by maxume (22995)

        The Lenovo 3000 (their first 'consumer' notebook) line does not really reflect the ThinkPad heritage, and as far as I can tell, the intent of the IdeaPad is to make a similarly consumer oriented notebook, but to leave out all of the clunky that they built into the 3000s (mediocre speakers, boring-as-possible design, etc.), so don't be surprised if this offering falls short of ThinkPad-based expectations.

      • by loteck (533317)

        Dell has removed the top line of function keys and tied them as alts to the number row, which should allow them to have slightly more space in the keyboard region and hopefully make for a more pleasant typing experience. I know Wind users and some EeePC users complain about cramped keyboards.

        Battery life/cost is absolutely the key issue for me, though.

        • by MojoStan (776183)

          Dell has removed the top line of function keys and tied them as alts to the number row, which should allow them to have slightly more space in the keyboard region and hopefully make for a more pleasant typing experience. I know Wind users and some EeePC users complain about cramped keyboards.

          I think removing the row of function keys would allow more space for the touchpad, but not the keyboard. I think the "typing experience" is limited more by the width of the keyboard area, which is limited by screen/case width.

          The touchpad is a common complaint about the first generation of netbooks. Either they're too small (Eee PCs) or they have buttons on either side instead of below (MSI Wind). There just isn't enough room below the keyboard for an adequately-sized touchpad with buttons below.

          Of cour

          • by bluemonq (812827)

            "Of course, I'd settle for a trackpoint instead of a touchpad."

            Considering the average consumer's reaction to a trackpoint.... never going to happen (sadly).

            • by PitaBred (632671)

              The trackpoint is a pain in the ass to use. It's useful if you're a very keyboard-centric person that only very rarely needs the mouse, but 99% of computer users use the mouse almost exclusively. Seriously... go watch people in a typical office trying to use an Office application.

            • by KGIII (973947)

              Is that the little nipple thing (never knew a name for it) that I used to get with my Toshiba laptops in the middle of the keyboard? Man that was handy as all hell. It took some getting used to but once you did you could turn the speed way up and pretty much have some excellent control of the cursor.

              I figured it had gone the way of the dino as I've not seen it on any models that I was specifically shopping for. (It isn't a buying point for me.) I did enjoy it back then but it did accumulate a lot of finger

    • My netbook purchase is also on hold, but it is more due to the fact that I am still waiting for:
      1. a netbook that will take a mobile phone sim card for web access.
      2. to know if Asus actually brings the SplashTop [engadget.com] to the Eee line,

      IMHO both the Dell's and this Lenovo look much better than the Eee's, but that SplashTop would (for me) be the killer feature.

      But given the speed with which these new models seem to reach Europe. I'll probably won't be actually getting one before December (when the West celebrates th

      • by jefu (53450)

        I'm looking casually at the netbooks, but would really like one that runs linux and will also serve (maybe with a plugin headset) as a cell phone. Then I could abandon my cheezy att cell phone which has no software worth mentioning on it and run a system where I have the controls, not whatever marketing company has paid the most to the cell companies.

      • I'm in the same boat - but am going for an Acer Aspire One (on sale now) and will be using a Huawei E220 3G net access dongle thing before the GSM/3G card comes out. I use this every day with an X41 and it works well...
  • by rs232 (849320) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:33PM (#24503291)
    "the S10 will sell for £319 (US$629) in the U.K., but in the U.S. the starting price is $399"

    Why is this, does it cost more to ship it to Europe or is it we're supposed to subsidise the US market?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by DragonWriter (970822)

      Why is this, does it cost more to ship it to Europe or is it we're supposed to subsidise the US market?

      No, its because they think they'll make more profit in Europe charging more, either because Europeans have more money they are willing to throw at this kind of tech, or because its a narrower, richer segment of the market willing to consider the product at all in Europe; its simply a matter of segmenting the market and charging as much as the market will bear in each segment.

      Cost probably has next to nothi

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by BlackCreek (1004083)
        Add to that the fact that the European web-market for bargains is terribly fragmented due to:
        1. The different languages;
        2. the fragmentation of the delivery market that makes prices for shipping across many national borders much higher than what it should, say in the US you often get single fee for continental US, but here you get single fee for ... Belgium or The Netherlands!
        • by cerberusss (660701) on Thursday August 07, 2008 @03:26AM (#24507195) Homepage Journal

          in the US you often get single fee for continental US, but here you get single fee for ... Belgium or The Netherlands!

          Of course it's a single fee for Belgium and The Netherlands. Belgium is a province of The Netherlands.
           
          On the other hand, I had expected a single fee for Germany and the two above, since The Netherlands is
          one of Germany's Bundeslander.

          • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

            Belgium doesn't exist! [zapatopi.net]. Please stop perpetuating the leftist agenda!
            • by chthon (580889)

              You know that here in this non-existent country the liberals are considered right-wing ?

          • by SimonGhent (57578)

            Of course it's a single fee for Belgium and The Netherlands. Belgium is a province of The Netherlands

            No it's not.

            Belgium is autonomous. It's a Kingdom and a parliamentary democracy.

            You may be thinking of Benelux which is a trading agreement between Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg, but Belgium certainly isn't a province of the Netherlands.

        • by xaxa (988988)

          As I'm on an island (Great Britain) I expect it'll be more expensive to ship something from outside the UK for a long time, as there's an increased cost to ship, fly or 'train' the goods here, but is it really the case that transporting something from, say, Strasbourg to Berlin is much more expensive than Stuttgart to Berlin? (taking into account the extra 150km)

          Britain should build another tunnel. Norwich to Amsterdam would be a good challenge :-).
          Building the existing tunnel 10cm bigger so double-stacked

          • Is it really more expensive to ship things from China to the UK than from China to the US? You can either take them by boat around Africa or by train across Asia to the UK. To the US you need to take them across the pacific, with no option of a land route.

            Of course, deliveries within Europe are more expensive than the US because of the higher fuel tax.

            • by xaxa (988988)

              The GP was referring to shipping within Europe. I assume that in the USA you can look for online bargains, and find stores all across the USA. I don't know how shipping charges work, but if you're in Florida and the best bargain is in California the GP said the shipping isn't too bad.

              If you live in the UK, it's not quite as good: you can search bargain stores within the UK and their location doesn't matter, but if you want to find a bargain from somewhere else in the EEA then you need
              - to understand the lan

      • No, its because they think they'll make more profit in Europe charging more, either because Europeans have more money they are willing to throw at this kind of tech, or because its a narrower, richer segment of the market willing to consider the product at all in Europe; its simply a matter of segmenting the market and charging as much as the market will bear in each segment.

        Cost probably has next to nothing to do with it.

        So this is what Europeans claim these days? Electronics cost more in Europe for decades, even when their economies were in the collective dumper.

        From my experience in selling things to people in European countries, it costs quite a bit more to get things from Asia to Europe than compared to North America, not to mention the mountain of languages needed to advertise for a smaller market. Blame your politicians and many languages.

    • by xaxa (988988) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:44PM (#24503441)

      - we're willing to pay more (i.e. we value stuff more)
      - more regulations (apparently)
      - tax included in the price (17.5% for the UK price)
      - company has to pay recycling charge (WEEE)
      - longer warrenties (by law)

      At least, that's what /. came up with last week :-)

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by ya really (1257084)

        - we're willing to pay more (i.e. we value stuff more)

        Ahhh...so that explains why my cell phone company keeps tacking on extra charges, they know I'll value their service more.

      • by gnuman99 (746007)

        It is true that the warranties in UK are crazy. But essentially you end up paying for 2 computers instead of 1.

        Your first comment just makes you look either stupid or snobbish though. I would never be willing to pay *more* for exactly the same product just for the privilege of paying more.

        Then again, with that attitude why isn't all of UK using a Mac? /joke

        • by xaxa (988988)

          It is true that the warranties in UK are crazy. But essentially you end up paying for 2 computers instead of 1.

          ...and in the US, you pay for ½ a computer, since it breaks after 6 months :D

          Your first comment just makes you look either stupid or snobbish though. I would never be willing to pay *more* for exactly the same product just for the privilege of paying more.

          That's from someone like Steve Jobs, who observed that if you have a unique product (e.g. iPod) then you can sell it for more in Europe than in the USA. This is similar to being able to sell it for more in the USA than in South Korea.

    • by rtechie (244489) *

      It doesn't cost more to ship TO Europe, it costs more to ship WITHIN Europe. European postal, shipping, and trucking rates are MUCH higher than in the US. So while it costs about the same to get it to the dock on the container ship, it costs a lot more to truck it from the dock to the store.

      For electronic products, there are also internationalization costs. Those costs are reduced for very popular languages, like Chinese and American English. Everyone else pays a premium.

      And remember, that's MSRP, not the w

    • The price difference is so massive that it really will be worth importing one from the US, even if (bloody) customs slap import duty on it.
      In fact the difference is so much that I wouldn't be suprised if small companies imported them from the US in bulk and undercut their fellow sellers.

      I thought the price difference was because they could sell more in the US than in Europe? the whole bulk-buying reduces costs strategy
  • by Channard (693317) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:36PM (#24503349) Journal
    Actually, we usually get screwed more on the price. More often than not, UK folks end up paying in pounds what US folks pay in dollars.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by maxume (22995)

      You can switch out "end up paying" for "are perfectly willing to pay"...

      • by csteinle (68146)

        While that's basically true for "must have" things, it certainly means I'm less inclined to buy as much stuff. For instance I'd buy a damn sight more games on impulse if they weren't £40-50 ($80-100) on release. As it is I think a lot longer about it and more often than not just decide I've got enough play left in the titles I've already bought. I'd probably spend more money total if games were twenty quid a pop.

        • by Haeleth (414428)

          This is why I like Steam.

  • Here in The Netherlands it's impossible to get the Linux version of the eee pc 901.

    Do I see a trend or is it a plot?

    • It seems they've been having problems shipping them out. I noticed around a month delay before the Linux version showed up on NewEgg.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by BlackCreek (1004083)

      Here in The Netherlands it's impossible to get the Linux version of the eee pc 901.

      Did you actually found the Eee 901 for sale in the NL already? (Just asking because I haven't seen it anywhere).

      • by Teun (17872)
        Computerpirates expected them yesterday but charge 430 euro...

        Others show pre order or 6-10 days delivery.

        And contrary to last weekend (when I last checked) they are now offering the 20GB Linux version!

        I'm pretty sure I saw them in the Tweakers.net price watch but they are not there right now, looks like a container got rerouted :)

    • by kramulous (977841) * on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @07:13PM (#24504319)
      Here in Aus, I noticed that just recently, the sub-notebooks for sale in the general electrical shops have had linux removed and now you can only see XP. This has happened in the last couple of months. I'll go with plot.
      • by walshy007 (906710)

        same only linux ones available were the 701 and even that was only if you asked and had them specifically order it for you in.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Petrushka (815171)
      I feel lucky, having read your post and the sibling posts, that I noticed when the Linux version of the 901 hit shop catalogues in NZ last week (thank you pricespy.co.nz). However, it's kind of conspicuous that any shop that has announced they have any in stock is out of stock the following day. Even the WinXP models seem to sell very quickly. I would like to think that the same thing has been happening in NL and Oz; it may even be true. But Asus' heavy emphasis on the WinXP line is certainly not just bad l
  • by gillbates (106458) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @05:55PM (#24503551) Homepage Journal

    To buy an Asus EEE PC. Not that IBM has a bad reputation with respect to being Linux compatible, but it was nice to have it come installed and just work out of the box.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Lenovo != IBM

  • No clit?! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by sznupi (719324) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @06:02PM (#24503633) Homepage

    Ehhh...Lenovo had a chance of replacing ridiculously small touchpads found in all netbooks with a trackpoint, ending up with THE best netbook on the market.

    Instead...they're only average/good... :/

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      You sound surprised. I've seen so many people praise the Thinkpad "nipple" on my old laptop as an astounding development, yet still buy a Dell instead because they double the RAM for free ...

      • by sznupi (719324)

        When it comes to normal sized laptops, one could say that touchpoint vs. trackpoint is a thing of personal preference (though from what I see around most people with touchpad only laptops use mouse if they can help it, going even to such ridiculous means as using minimouse on the smooth surface of the laptop (when "on the move") next to touchpad; otoh people who have trackpoints often use them even if notebook sits on the desk in their home)

        BUT...when it comes to netbooks...touchpads on them are borderline

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by karnal (22275)

        Most of the business class notebooks I've used at my employer - All dells, a few ibms - every one has a trackpoint style device.

        To be honest though - the IBMs seem to work better. The ones on the early dells (c600/610) had a manufacturing problem in the keyboard that would make the mouse fly all over the screen after the keyboard heated up from normal use and warped the sensor underneath.

        The T42 I'm using now has an awesome trackpoint - and I used to swear by these and never use the touchpad. Since the im

        • by jimicus (737525)

          The ones on the early dells (c600/610) had a manufacturing problem in the keyboard that would make the mouse fly all over the screen after the keyboard heated up from normal use and warped the sensor underneath.

          I remember those! They earned Dell a lifetime ban from my previous employer.

          As much as anything else, the lifetime ban was because you'd spend an hour on the phone trying to battle through a script "Have you checked the BIOS settings? Have you reinstalled Windows?" even after you'd explained that you'd had an engineer out every week for the past month replacing such keyboards and that as far as the engineers were concerned, it was a known issue.

    • Well ... personally I stay away from using laptops that only have those, if I can't use a mouse with them.

      I really, really, really cannot stand them. It's just way too much like using a joystick, and joysticks aren't supposed to be used for that.

  • When is someone going to release a laptop with a Cortex A8/9 CPU? If you build it from the same sorts of components as the Pandora console, but a better keyboard, a bit more RAM, and slight bigger screen then you could keep the power consumption and cost really low. Of course, it wouldn't run Windows, but since hardware manufacturers are starting to remember a time when software allowed them to differentiate their products, maybe this isn't a bad thing...
  • by Kazoo the Clown (644526) on Wednesday August 06, 2008 @08:24PM (#24504867)
    So now XP's $399. And you get a free computer with it. Considering how much Vista costs, that sounds like a pretty good deal...
  • Lenovo also isn't offering the latest version of the Thinkpad T/X series (T400, T500, X200) in Linux, yet. I imagine the primary reason is that Intel hasn't yet written drivers for the Intel 5100 wireless chipset.

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