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How much of your media do you store locally?

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0% to 20%
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20% to 40%
  487 votes / 3%
40% to 60%
  519 votes / 3%
60% to 80%
  1140 votes / 7%
80% to 100%
  11901 votes / 74%
I don't store any media
  481 votes / 3%
Depends which cloud providers shut down this week
  475 votes / 2%
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  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
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How much of your media do you store locally?

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  • All of it (Score:5, Insightful)

    by techno-vampire (666512) on Tuesday December 17, 2013 @08:05PM (#45720715) Homepage
    Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.
    • Re:All of it (Score:5, Insightful)

      by ThorGod (456163) on Tuesday December 17, 2013 @08:39PM (#45721085) Journal

      Or, how ever long they want to have that service free. They can just boot you anytime or close up that application, GOOGLE.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Or, how ever long they want to have that service free. They can just boot you anytime or close up that application, GOOGLE.

        This. Most of the stuff I've watched on YouTube I also store locally.

        That just paid dividends last month when they forced everyone to switch to DASH instead of HTTP for 1080p streams (resultsing in choppy buffering all the time), and again last week when they downgraded all 256k audio to 128k.

        • by Chrisq (894406)

          This. Most of the stuff I've watched on YouTube I also store locally.

          You must have a fine porn collection

      • Pah

        What is this discrimination?!

      • Or, how ever long they want to have that service free. They can just boot you anytime or close up that application, GOOGLE.

        Or they could *stop* charging and give you a terabyte of data, FLICKR

      • Or just say now downloading that stuff will cost you $1 per MB, or hand the keys to NSA/those that would like to sue. Or the flip side your ISP might start charging you onurous rates for both the initial download, the upload to the cloud provider then a download again when you really want to consume the content. Of course things are easier for people that own/produce the content but ... they are rare. For every nerd shooting uncompressed HD video there are a thousand nerds downloading HD porn/TV/games etc.

      • The only media that leaves our home (the media server has local backup), does so on our portable media players.

        Some of our mp3/video players are dumb enough (only a USB link) to trust. If the telephones which also serve some of that purpose are uploading them - or the media's metadata - to outside agencies, there's no trace of it in the logs. This doesn't mean that it's not happening, but there is no trace that I can find.

    • Exactly (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Overzeetop (214511) on Tuesday December 17, 2013 @09:24PM (#45721527) Journal

      I don't "store" anything in the cloud. I backup to the cloud, and I use it for synchronization, but I have everything locally. Most things at least twice.

      • by mlts (1038732)

        Nail, head hit. To me, the cloud is another piece of media, like a tape, hard disk, SSD, USB flash drive, or punchcard. Said media has its uses, but it also has shortcomings.

        Right now, my cloud stuff also syncs to a HDD volume (it gets its own separate ReFS volume so that bit rot can be detected), and gets backed up to another volume every so often.

        Files I want to archive offline, I just reach for Blu-Ray blanks and burn archives split to the media size, with a couple disks used in case one of the BD-R di

        • Nail, head hit. To me, the cloud is another piece of media, like a tape, hard disk, SSD, USB flash drive, or punchcard. Said media has its uses, but it also has shortcomings.

          How could you store Media on the cloud anyway. Wouldn't it be expensive to mail all the CDs, USB drives, Tapes and hard drives to the cloud where ever they are. It would be much more sensible to store Data on the cloud.

      • by CastrTroy (595695)
        I wouldn't even say I use "the cloud". I have 50 GB backup storage included (on top of what they give me for actual web content use) with my hosting plan, and I back stuff up there. I trust this more because I'm paying for it, so (I presume) it's less likely to just disappear one day. I keep everything locally, on at least 2 different machines.
      • Re:Exactly (Score:5, Funny)

        by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 18, 2013 @02:34PM (#45728297)

        Most things at least twice

         
        Exactly!

        c:\records

        c:\records_backup

        c:\records_backup2

        [smug] I don't know about you chumps, but I'm covered for backups [/smug]

      • by MrL0G1C (867445)

        Backup is stored, duh.

    • Re:All of it (Score:4, Insightful)

      by niftydude (1745144) on Wednesday December 18, 2013 @05:03AM (#45723865)
      Not to mention that

      sudo apt-get install openssh-server sshfs

      gives me my own cloud. Why would I use "the" cloud?

      So I can get spam emails every time an artist on my list of music visits town? So I can lose all my media when the cloud provider goes broke, or has their assets frozen by the feds because some content elsewhere on their network is allegedly infringing copyright (ala kim dotcom)?

      I don't know why I don't fall over myself to take advantage of such an opportunity.
      • Oh, I do that too, but I haven't figured out a good, _simple_ way to access this with my Android phone media players. I do not want to have to install a special server, that's what sshd is! I do not want to have to root my phone (e.g., in order to use sshfs). Maybe it's out there, but I haven't found it yet.

        My dream would be to see AOL open-source Winamp now that they've abandoned it and the community could add ssh/scp support. The Winamp Android player is a nice piece of kit and I always use it for p

        • by ichthus (72442)
          AndFTP [google.com], which handles sftp/scp file browsing and transfers. You're welcome.
          • Thanks, but I've already got that. I'm not interested in tediously downloading something before I can listen to it. That's not my definition of "simple". The SFTP/SCP part needs to be transparent. I should be able to see all my stuff on my server as if it were on the phone... just like I can with Amazon's MP3 player.

        • Oh, I do that too, but I haven't figured out a good, _simple_ way to access this with my Android phone media players. I do not want to have to install a special server, that's what sshd is! I do not want to have to root my phone (e.g., in order to use sshfs). Maybe it's out there, but I haven't found it yet.

          I agree - it kinda sux that the sshfs implementation on android needs root. However, if you want to stream to an android media player from your home server, and you don't want to root your device, a combination of an openvpn [google.com] vpn, and samba filesharing will do the job. A lot of routers support openvpn out of the box now - but failing that any linux server can be configured to provide vpn addresses.

        • Just to add to the choices others are giving, you could take a look at OwnCloud [owncloud.org]. If you are running a php-based website already you won't have to install any new server. (It does need an HTTP server, and has it's own interface.)

          It exports things via WebDAV, and it has an Android client. (Or you can use other WebDAV Android clients.) So you can mount the server on you computer as a directory, and you can easily get stuff to your phone as well. The one thing is that you need to upload into it - not into

      • by crdotson (224356)

        Wow, you're right! "sudo apt-get install openssh-server sshfs", configuring it, and then figuring out how to access that from every device you have is certainly easier than installing the DropBox app.

        You and I (and probably a lot of people on Slashdot) know how to set up such things. Most people don't. And even those of us who do don't always enjoy reinventing the wheel. I completely get that you don't want or need to use such services, but the attitude of "why would ANYONE want such a thing" really baf

    • Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.

      Storing it locally works as long as you don't get robbed...
      and your house don't burn down...
      and you don't get hit by major disaster (i.e. flood)...
      and your storage medium doesn't fail...

      I keep mine locally (2 redundant systems) and in cloud

      • Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.

        Storing it locally works as long as you don't get robbed...
        and your house don't burn down...
        and you don't get hit by major disaster (i.e. flood)...
        and your storage medium doesn't fail...

        I keep mine locally (2 redundant systems) and in cloud

        It's not a real cloud, you know. All those thi

        • Sure, but the chances it will happen both locally and in the cloud, at the same time, is very small. If one fails, you recreate from the other.

      • That's why a few months ago when visiting my parents I gave them a spindle of optical media to stick in their closet. Two copies of everything at home, two copies offsite, new full backups of everything about once a year or so, multiple backups to hard drives continuously, periodic incremental backups to optical every couple months or so. Yes, it's a hassle, but it's saved my bacon a few times, and one time even saved my employer's bacon (not my current employer).

    • Oh, I store plenty of stuff on the cloud, but it's not my only storage. I sprung for Amazon's cloud music storage. $25/y/250000 songs and have uploaded my music collection there (about 2000 CDs' worth and about half as much in electronic purchases), however, that's for convenience. And given that the Amazon MP3 player has been doing nothing but crashing on my Android phone for the last couple weeks, it's not even a convenience right now.

      I'm sure they'll sort out the software eventually, but a 64GB SDXC

    • by Tsingi (870990)

      Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else?

      There's no good reason to do that. Storage is dirt cheap. If you don't own a real computer you might find it useful. If you aren't storing it on your own system though, you should reconsider calling it 'your' media, because you don't actually possess it.

    • by Sloppy (14984)

      Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else?

      My interpretation of the question, was that if you're taking backup tapes home from the office (or if you have a hard drive stashed at a friend's or relative's house) then some of your media isn't local. And the reason you might want to do that, would be to have data survive "serious" problems, such as fire, flood, etc.

      I didn't see the question as implying anything about storing things on other people's computers ("cloud"), t

    • by GIL_Dude (850471)
      I guess the question does come down to "your media". However some of it is in a grey area. For example, I have a bunch of (legal) MP3 files that I personally ripped from CDs (which I still have). So I have these MP3 files and CDs here locally. But, I also have them on Google Music. How does that count? 1/3 cloud? Or, since they are the same files is that "local" and ignore the cloud "copy". We have a ton of DVDs in several racks. Those, of course, are local. As far as movies in the cloud, I never purchased
      • No, not strange. Just because I watch the occasional youtube video doesn't mean that I'm storing any of my stuff in the cloud. If I want to keep a copy, I use a Firefox extension to make a local copy, which is then "mine."
    • Depends on the device. I have all of it in the cloud so I can also access it from my Surface and phone (so not local at the moment) but it is still all backed up. The question then becomes why not *also* have it in the cloud?

    • by Ogive17 (691899)
      I would be worried the RIAA would go after those that store music in the cloud.
    • by bogjobber (880402)
      It can be extremely convenient to store application data in the cloud. I use budgeting software that syncs to dropbox, making it possible to switch seamlessly between using the software on my phone and desktop.

      That being said, I think the total amount I store on dropbox is about 50MB so it's a very small percentage of my total data.
    • by crdotson (224356)

      And really, why should you buy power from the power company? It only works as long as the power company is in business. Get a generator, truck in some fuel I say!

      They're not exactly equivalent, but I assume you actually know some valid answers to "why would I ever store stuff on a cloud service" and you're just being obstinate. (I admire obstinacy! ) And, of course, it's entirely possible to encrypt the data on a cloud service so that it remains "your business".

      • I assume you actually know some valid answers to "why would I ever store stuff on a cloud service" and you're just being obstinate.

        You assume wrong. I'm retired, I'm only concerned about my personal data/media and see no possible valid reason to store it where I don't have control of it. Not even to have access to it from away from home, because I have safe, secure ways to do that already. Now, if I were currently working in IT, and management was too penny-pinching to provide for a proper backup sys
    • by pla (258480)
      Why should I store any of my media (or other data, for that matter) anyplace else? Storing it in the cloud only works for as long as your cloud provider stays in business, and what I store is my business and nobody else's.

      In fairness, I keep a low-quality (256k MP3) copy of my current active rotation playlist in the cloud. Kinda nice having it accessible from anywhere I have connectivity without needing to store it on every portable player I own (phone, tablet, laptop, car, etc).

      Key word there, though
  • by Anonymous Coward

    I use BitTorrent Sync you insensitive clod!

  • If by "media" you mean any thing that I consume (TV, YouTube, music) then I store about .5% of my media locally, mostly the pictures on my phone that I haven't bothered to put in the cloud. If by media you mean pictures, videos, and music that I own (don't pay a subscription to access), then about 95% of my media is local
    • And anything I don't store locally, I put in the cloud to share with people
  • Uh... Software? Does gmail count?
    Music? Yeah, almost all of it. Oh, but pandora - I don't own it - is it mine?
    Pictures... Both. So, how do I count that?
    Video - same as pandora. It's not mine, but I have access to all of Netflix. Does that count?

    • by locopuyo (1433631)
      The poller was referring to traditional cloud services, not streaming services where you don't own the content. That would be like counting every TV show and movie you watch on cable TV.
      I can see how that is hard to understand because many people don't buy any media anymore, they stream it. I haven't bought any music or movies for years now.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    All of it is on CloudboyNeal

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Now while I HATE the "cloud", there is a good reason for it to exist - Porn. All the stuff I dont want lying around on my own machines and spinny disk get sent to the "cloud" and stored there until I ...ummm.... yeah your grown people, you work it out! If you take a second to think about covering your tracks too, your SO or family wont know and never find it. Sure the NSA will be able to access it, but they just see I like boobs. Maybe they will be grateful I have a really nice porn collection.

  • 50% (Score:4, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday December 18, 2013 @12:03AM (#45722479)

    About half of my stuff is stored locally. The rest is stored on a pile of optical discs way over on the other side of the room.

  • A is A (Score:5, Insightful)

    by mcmonkey (96054) on Wednesday December 18, 2013 @12:05AM (#45722499) Homepage

    The question is tautological.

    How much of my media do I store locally? If it's not local, it's not mine.

    So 100%.

    • That is a question of definitions. I say the stuff people have on a cloud service is still theirs. The EULA may grant some rights to the provider but that data is still owned by the user.
      If I lend a tool to a friend it doesn't suddenly become theirs. It's still mine, while I grant the friend the right to use it. Ergo the data on the cloud server still belongs to the user.

      I assume of course that the EULA doesn't state the data is owned by the provider. I also assume that the EULA states that the data wi
      • If I lend a tool to a friend it doesn't suddenly become theirs. It's still mine, while I grant the friend the right to use it. Ergo the data on the cloud server still belongs to the user.

        When I loan a tool to a friend, the likelihood of recovery is in direct inverse proportion to how close a friend he/she is. If it's family, hell, she is gone baby gone.

  • I store some of my media on the hard drive.., ripped DVDs, CDs, and yes, records...
    I store some of my media in the TV cabinet... DVDs, and VHS
    I store some of my media near the stereo ... CD and Cassettes and Records
    I store some of my media in the closet ... 8 track tapes, floppy discs
    I store some of my media on the wall ... Digital Art I've created.
    I store some of my media on a linux box for streaming music at my workplace.... no pandora ads.
    I store exactly one "album" in the cloud. which is about
  • The media that I buy is only "stored in the cloud" because thats where they put it after I buy it. Then I download it to my computer(s) and back it up to external drives (both spining and solid state)

    I don't ever upload anything to the cloud

  • All my movies, music, software, etc. are all on local media. I have some Gmail, and a limited number of Google Docs. in the "cloud".

  • The only media I store is photos and video of my family. Beyond that, nothing. I used to have big drives full of music and movies, but Netflix and Grooveshark and Rdio and those guys are just easier to deal with. Occasionally I'll torrent a TV show that isn't on Netflix, but I don't bother with high-quality rips and I delete the download when I'm done.

    Honestly, I'm surprised that people like me aren't a bigger share of the poll results. Interesting.

    "Ownership" of ephemeral things like music and movies means

    • by torsmo (1301691)
      Filthy casual!
      • by neiras (723124)

        Filthy casual!

        Yeah, yeah. I have a library of decade-old CDs formatted with BFS (the BeOS filesystem), which contain the "massive" media library of my 20-something self all tagged and organized perfectly. I've earned the right to not care anymore.

        Hmm. I wonder if Linux has a BFS driver.

        • Haiku in a VM and rsync the CDs across. Though, if the tagging is done in BFS metadata then that may be an interesting problem (though not particularly difficult) to solve.
  • by bobjr94 (1120555) on Wednesday December 18, 2013 @02:49AM (#45723325) Homepage
    Instant access, no logging on, no updates required to play this content, no wasted bandwidth with the same media over and over, no moving / loosing your files when your cloud provider closes up.
  • by Indigo (2453)
    If it ain't on my disk, it ain't really mine.
  • Local to me, or backed up on storage media I control? The latter might not be (and usually isn't) local, often to the tune of several hundred or even thousand miles.

    I have digital copies of all my media, and physical ones for that matter, stored at home, but I don't carry the whole lot around with me. I voted 100%, since I think that was the intent, but I have less than 10% of it available to me when I'm away from home on my phone/laptop, although that is going up as more and more is also available via
  • I keep all the photos I take locally and upload the better ones to Flickr. I call the local store a backup and the Flickr uploads the media and answered 0-20%, but some might view the local store as the media and the Flickr uploads as a backup.

    As others have said I stopped collecting music/video locally once I knew I could stream/torrent anything I wanted whenever I wanted.

    I'm really surprised at the results of this poll, I hope you all have off site backups!

    For all of those of you saying that giving you da

  • I store all of my media locally. I imagine most people do.

    Did the person who wrote the question actually mean something completely different? e.g. "How much of the movies, TV shows, and music that you watch or listen to originates from your own personal collection?

    • by j2.718ff (2441884)

      I store all of my media locally. I imagine most people do.

      Did the person who wrote the question actually mean something completely different? e.g. "How much of the movies, TV shows, and music that you watch or listen to originates from your own personal collection?

      I suppose a person could post a video to youtube, and then misplace/delete the original.

  • The greatest portion of my data is photos, music, and videos. These are all large files consumed almost exclusively locally.

    I back my stuff up to the cloud as well as off-site.

  • If I have Netflix streaming, I can watch thousands of movies and TV shows that are not stored locally, so are those 'mine'?

    If so, then I have about 0.0000000000001% of my media stored locally since the vast majority of it is accessed on the cloud.

    In terms of media that I watch, I stream about 1000 shows or movies for every 1 that might watch from a local collection (if ever).

  • Local backups should count towards the total.

  • I thought this meant the proper networking definition of "locally" as in "on localhost."

    Most of mine is on my home server, and that's usually not the machine I'm using (although it doubles as an HTPC). But I don't use any streaming services like Netflix or Hulu. It's all stored on hard drives in my house.

  • I keep all my data at my house. Where are you writing the question from? Doubt I'm local to you.

  • Dropbox? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by businessnerd (1009815) on Wednesday December 18, 2013 @03:02PM (#45728583)
    Not sure how to answer this one since I use Dropbox. Everything uploaded to Dropbox exists locally on my HDD as well as having a second copy on one of the other computers in my household with enough disk space. At one point I had 3 computers all synchronized with Dropbox. So 100% is stored locally AND in the cloud. I know Slashdot loves to hate on the cloud, but most of the arguments against it don't apply to Dropbox. If Dropbox were to disappear tomorrow, I would still have my data (and still backed up in multiple locations). There is no migrating away, since all I do is just upload to the new service without having to retrieve anything from Dropbox (I already have it). From a disaster recovery standpoint, the only scenario where I am exposed is if Dropbox disappears followed by my house burning down destroying every hard drive I own beyond recovery. The chances of this are very slim and if I was really that worried about it, I could set up another computer outside of my house (say at a trusted friends house on the other side of the country) and have Dropbox synchronize there as well. The only valid argument is the privacy one, since Dropbox theoretically could access any data I have uploaded to their service. They claim it is encrypted and they don't look at it, but that doesn't mean they couldn't. The solution here is to not upload anything I wouldn't want them to see. Some also have had success with uploading a TrueCrypt volume into Dropbox.
    • by kaladorn (514293)
      You can't trust that they can't see your stuff, as you point out.

      Moving a TrueCrypt is more viable (assuming TC is clean), but it is bandwidth heavy since you have to move the whole crypt.

      I would like to see the following product become available:

      A 'private cloud' not hosted by folks like Amazon, but rather software available to be hosted by any group. This private cloud software would provide email, SMS/MMS hooks, video and audio chat, and a storage repository system all setup to be encrypted in situ and i
    • I said 80-100% based on DropBox. I have 4 GB storage for free there (was an early adopter and got some some referrals to sign up) and I used up every GB, primarily with photos but also with backups of configuration files, text documents, very old installers for obsoleted programs, and pretty much anything original that I can't replace by downloading it again from someplace else. I have about 400 GB of total in-use storage - 128 GB SSD and a 1TB spinning drive that has around 300 GB of music files on it th
  • All my important files (including media) are hosted on the machines they primarily "belong" to, then they are backed up locally to a file server and then to two overseas destinations several hundred miles apart. rsync and creative scripting are indispensable tools for this.

    When I take pictures, my attitude is that nothing is secure until the pictures have been downloaded to the local fileserver and replicated to at least one of the overseas destinations. (Isn't that what friends and family are for????)

    W
  • As of right now, every picture, video, song or game I own has a copy stored locally, sometimes with a "cloud" backup.

    For a long time, that wasn't true. My Steam library in particular outstripped my hard drive capacity for several years, until I started buying storage specifically for it. My desktop now has every game* downloaded, although my laptop can only fit whatever games I feel like playing on the go. But if Steam ever shuts down, all I have to do is set it to offline mode (or download one of the alrea

  • on what you consider to be "my" media.

    If "my" media is the stuff that I legally own, then 100%. If it's stuff that I own both legally and illegally, then also 100%.

    If, however, you're talking about media that I consume, then then answer is in the 0-20% bracket. Almost everything I watch comes from Netflix. Music I play comes from streaming radio. Even the log fireplace with xmas carols is a 3-hour-long Youtube video.

    I would consider this media to be "stored" because it remains available to me, and I can

  • Is the poll suggesting that media not "local" is your media?
  • by kheldan (1460303) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @01:36PM (#45737853) Journal
    As soon as "The Cloud" came into being, I saw immediately the problem: You want me to let someone else hold onto things I allegedly own? Really? Are you kidding me? and that's been my position all along, and I've been harangued more or less continuously by people claiming I'm a "tinfoil hat wearer", or that I go around yelling "get off my lawn!", etc. Of course as time goes by we all read more and more legitimate news stories of "cloud services providers" who go out of business, or lose people's data, or arbitrarily decide that content bought and paid for shouldn't be in the "posession" of the person who paid for it anymore. How do you like me now, doubters? You still enjoying your "cloud" storage? Uh huh, thought so. Maybe Santa will bring you a nice offline backup drive so you can keep track of your own stuff instead.
    • Wouldn't the same logic apply to banks? You let a bank keep your money for you, and yet still consider it to be yours.

  • by k6mfw (1182893) on Thursday December 19, 2013 @05:26PM (#45740341)
    all my good stuff is on PC and Mac that is not connected to the internet. it's the only way to be sure.
  • Or, does the graph look like a giant middle finger?
  • by Tom (822)

    While I have copies of some of my stuff online, there is nothing that I consider "my own" that is not stored on a computer I own or rent (i.e. my desktop machines or my hosted servers).

    If you store your media "in the cloud", you are - in my eyes - an idiot. If someone else can take it away from you at any time for any reason or no reason at all, then it is not yours, period.

    Wake me when cloud providers have become dumb drives like ISPs have become dumb pipes and I can store my data transparently distributed

  • by will_die (586523)
    The only thing I store in the "cload" are my saved games for things like steam and origin and that more a backup.
  • If can be withdrawn [theguardian.com] at a publisher request, is it your media?
  • I have a lot of stuff on a "cloud". I also have it locally, so if this "cloud" disappears in a puff of, er, cloud, I still have my stuff.

  • On the PC in front of me, on a general purpose server, on a NAS somewhere else on my own network ?

    If it's this marvellous cloudy thing I keep hearing is the saviour of all things IT then basically nothing, just steam sync save games.

Never trust a computer you can't repair yourself.

 



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